DRF News

Next DRF Seminar Rearranged for May

Due to some unforeseen circumstances, the next DRF seminar (due for March 25th) is being postponed.  Apologies for any inconvenience.  The rearranged DRF schedule for the remainder of the 2010-11 academic year, is as follows:

DRF Seminar #6 *FREE!*: Tuesday 12th April 2011: 2pm-4pm

Venue: Room 10111 (First Floor) Arundel Building, Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB

Programme:

  • “How do nurses affect the parent experience of preschool autism assessment and diagnosis?” ~ Julia Halpin  (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University)
  •  Title TBC ~ Ellianna Mantaka-Brinkmann (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University)

 

DRF Seminar #7 *FREE!*: Thursday 12th May 2011: 1pm-3pm 

Venue: Room 10111 (First Floor) Arundel Building, Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB

Programme:

  • “Imagined Possibilities: exploring teachers’ perspectives on factors influencing the educational opportunities for children with the label of autism in a mainstream school context.”~ Sue Chantler (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University):

In this research study for my professional doctorate I worked with a group of primary school teachers to examine their reflections on the factors which influence the educational opportunities for children with the label of autism in a mainstream school context. The focus for this seminar will be on what emerges on working with the data, including some reflection by the researcher on her chosen methodology.

  • “A visible / invisible identity” ~ Erin Pritchard (Department of Geography, Politics and Sociology, Newcastle University)

It can be argued that disability is viewed as homogenous where by non-disabled individuals are unaware of the various disabilities that exist, instead having a stereotypical view of disability and therefore effecting who counts as disabled. I want to show how stereotypes of disability and representations of dwarfs construct a misleading view of dwarfism, often not being regarded as a disability which in turn causes social problems and problems of identity. Although dwarfism is a very visible disability which attracts a lot of negative attention it is not often viewed as a disability by both disabled and non-disabled people due to what is regarded and seen as a disability by them. Using the social model of disability and recent interviews that I have conducted with dwarfs this paper seeks to demonstrate how dwarfism is a disability constructed by an unaccommodating built environment and by an attitudinal environment.

We will be drawing up the schedule for 2011-2012 in due course ~ if you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a future DRF seminar please contact Rebecca Mallett on r.mallett@shu.ac.uk. Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book you’d like to facilitate a round table discussion on.  

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