DRF News, Events and Conferences

Reminders of next DRF Seminar and *Theorizing Normalcy and the Mundane* abstract submission deadline

The next DRF Seminar #7 *FREE!* is on Thursday 12th May 2011: 1pm-3pm 

Venue: Room 10111 (First Floor) Arundel Building, Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB 

Programme:

  • “Imagined Possibilities: exploring teachers’ perspectives on factors influencing the educational opportunities for children with the label of autism in a mainstream school context.”~ Sue Chantler (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University):

In this research study for my professional doctorate I worked with a group of primary school teachers to examine their reflections on the factors which influence the educational opportunities for children with the label of autism in a mainstream school context. The focus for this seminar will be on what emerges on working with the data, including some reflection by the researcher on her chosen methodology.

  • “A visible / invisible identity” ~ Erin Pritchard (Department of Geography, Politics and Sociology, Newcastle University):

It can be argued that disability is viewed as homogenous where by non-disabled individuals are unaware of the various disabilities that exist, instead having a stereotypical view of disability and therefore effecting who counts as disabled. I want to show how stereotypes of disability and representations of dwarfs construct a misleading view of dwarfism, often not being regarded as a disability which in turn causes social problems and problems of identity. Although dwarfism is a very visible disability which attracts a lot of negative attention it is not often viewed as a disability by both disabled and non-disabled people due to what is regarded and seen as a disability by them. Using the social model of disability and recent interviews that I have conducted with dwarfs this paper seeks to demonstrate how dwarfism is a disability constructed by an unaccommodating built environment and by an attitudinal environment.

We will be drawing up the schedule for 2011-2012 in due course ~ if you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a future DRF seminar please contact Rebecca Mallett on r.mallett@shu.ac.uk. Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book you’d like to facilitate a round table discussion on.  

And a reminder… the deadline for submitting abstracts for the*FREE!* Critical Disability Studies Conference *Theorizing Normalcy and the Mundane* Conference 2011 (14th – 15th September 2011) is rapidly approaching (22nd May) – for more information see the original post here

Uncategorized

Journalism Competition focuses on the lives of disabled girls

The Guardian (UK) have announced an International Development Journalism Competition for stories that will feature the challenges faced by disabled girls.

They are asking:

  • what are the challenges disabled girls face in accessing their rights under the UNCRC and UNCRPD.
  • to what extent are NGOs (Non-Governmental Organisations) and national governments meeting the needs and rights of disabled girls?
  • are all the different types of disabilities [impairments] under the UNCRPD being equally included in development programmes and policies?
  • to what extent is gender exacerbating the issue?
  • how can the larger development community ensure that it includes disabled girls within its own policies and programmes?

The deadline for submission is 13th June 2011.

For guidance and more information click here.

DRF News, Majority/Minority Worlds

New edition of disability research e-newletter released

The eighth issue of the Global South to North Disability Research Network E-newsletter is now available. 

Features include details of the Theorizing Normalcy and the Mundane 2nd International conference at MMU, an African Policy on Disability and Development (A-PODD) Project Update and information on the upcoming AfriNEAD Symposium 2011 in Zimbabwe.

To contribute or for further information, please contact email Tsitsi Chataika: tchataika@sun.ac.za

DRF News

Details of Upcoming DRF Seminars

DRF Seminar #6 *FREE!*: Tuesday 12th April 2011: 2pm-4pm

Venue: Room 10111 (First Floor) Arundel Building, Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB 

Programme:

  • ‘Working in Pammakaristos Foundation in Greece and doing my research programme’ ~ Ellianna Mantaka-Brinkmann (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University)
  • Discussion: Plans for the DRF into 2011-12?

 DRF Seminar #7 *FREE!*: Thursday 12th May 2011: 1pm-3pm 

Venue: Room 10111 (First Floor) Arundel Building, Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB 

Programme:

  • “Imagined Possibilities: exploring teachers’ perspectives on factors influencing the educational opportunities for children with the label of autism in a mainstream school context.”~ Sue Chantler (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University):

In this research study for my professional doctorate I worked with a group of primary school teachers to examine their reflections on the factors which influence the educational opportunities for children with the label of autism in a mainstream school context. The focus for this seminar will be on what emerges on working with the data, including some reflection by the researcher on her chosen methodology.

  • “A visible / invisible identity” ~ Erin Pritchard (Department of Geography, Politics and Sociology, Newcastle University)

It can be argued that disability is viewed as homogenous where by non-disabled individuals are unaware of the various disabilities that exist, instead having a stereotypical view of disability and therefore effecting who counts as disabled. I want to show how stereotypes of disability and representations of dwarfs construct a misleading view of dwarfism, often not being regarded as a disability which in turn causes social problems and problems of identity. Although dwarfism is a very visible disability which attracts a lot of negative attention it is not often viewed as a disability by both disabled and non-disabled people due to what is regarded and seen as a disability by them. Using the social model of disability and recent interviews that I have conducted with dwarfs this paper seeks to demonstrate how dwarfism is a disability constructed by an unaccommodating built environment and by an attitudinal environment.

We will be drawing up the schedule for 2011-2012 in due course ~ if you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a future DRF seminar please contact Rebecca Mallett on r.mallett@shu.ac.uk. Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book you’d like to facilitate a round table discussion on.  

DRF News, Events and Conferences

Does Every Child Matter, post-Blair? They sure do! (Conference Report)

Overview of Project: Does Every Child Matter, post-Blair?

What’s life like for disabled children in England?  A research team based at the Research Institute for Health and Social Change at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) have been finding out about the lives of disabled children and their families over the last two years as part of the project ‘Does Every Child Matter, post-Blair?  The interconnections of disabled childhoods’ funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

On 6th April, 2011, a conference was held at MMU which marked the end of the project but the beginning of the process of sharing the project findings  The day brought together researchers from across the UK with disabled young people, parents/carers, and professionals to share ideas.  Professor Dan Goodley and Dr Katherine Runswick-Cole started the day with a presentation of key project findings (for more information on the project visit here and for an overview of the key findings visit here).

This was followed by Dr Louise Holt from Loughborough University presenting a paper entitled: Special units for young people with socio-emotional differences: micro-institutions or spaces of inclusion?  After the break, Hannah Derbyshire presented ‘My Story’ – a fun filled story of her life as a young disabled person.  This was followed by Linda Derbyshire’s moving and inspirational talk ‘Mug of a tea cup?’ in which she explained how she had challenged people to include Hannah in school and in the wider community.  After lunch, George Newsome presented ‘Little about me’ in which he asked the audience to think about the ways in which they could challenge people who discriminate against disabled people. Dr Janice McLaughlin, Newcastle University, spoke about mothering a disabled child in her paper Modes of care and mothering: How does citizenship and care intersect in the lives of mothers of disabled children?.  And the day ended with Angharad Beckett from University of Leeds talking about Challenging Disabling Attitudes; Building an Inclusive Society’. Making the case for anti-disablist education strategies. Podcasts of the sessions are available to download here.

Dr Katherine Runswick-Cole said ‘We know that disabled children matter and, like their non-disabled peers, disabled children are participating in their schools and communities in positive ways which challenge the sometimes negative images of disabled children and young people that circulate. But, we also know that many disabled children still face unacceptable barriers to full participation and that they and their parents/carers have to fight to be included.  In a time of ‘Big Society’ and in the context of cuts to public services, it is everyone’s responsibility to challenge policy makers, practitioners and the wider community to expose and then dismantle these barriers for disabled children.  As Linda said in her presentation ‘Do disabled children matter?  They sure do!’”.

For more information contact Katherine at k.runswick-cole@mmu.ac.uk

DRF News, Events and Conferences

Call for Papers for ‘Disability Studies: Every Body In’ Inaugural Conference

Event: Disability Studies: Every Body In ~ Inaugural Conference

Date: Sunday 27th November – Wednesday 30th November 2011

Location: University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Brief Description: Disability Studies is an interdisciplinary academic field that focuses on the experiences, perspectives, rights and leadership of disabled people. Interpreting disability within a social justice framework, Disability Studies encourages the exploration of disability issues across a wide range of disciplines as well as different socio-cultural, political, economic, historical, legal, health, and educational contexts.

The aim of this inaugural conference is to provide a forum for people from diverse backgrounds and life experiences to share their knowledge and research with others. We warmly welcome the participation of:

  • People with impairments, family/whānau, support people
  • Educators, practitioners, service providers
  • Legal, business and community representatives
  • Policy makers, government employees
  • Researchers, students (including school, undergraduate and postgraduate students)
  • Anyone who has an interest in disability and social justice matters

Call for Papers: The conference theme, Every Body In, is deliberately broad, in the hope that presentation topics and means of delivery will reflect the diverse nature of Disability Studies. We welcome innovative and creative presentations that are engaging and accessible, and that reflect a wide range of experiences, knowledge and research regarding disability matters in national and international contexts. The conference will be structured to encourage participants to meet and interact within and across particular interest and sector groups.

Keynote Speakers include: Anne Hawker (President of Rehabilitation International); Professor Patricia O’Brien (Chair in Disability Studies & Director, Centre for Disability Studies, University of Sydney) and; Dr Tom Shakespeare (Author, social scientist, bioethicist and editor of the World Report on Disability)

Importatn dates and details:

  • Please submit proposals for presentations by 26 June 2011 using the format provided on the conference website.
  • All proposals will be peer reviewed and abstracts published online as part of the conference proceedings.
  • Presenters will be notified by 17 July 2011 of the acceptance of their proposal.
  • All presenters must register for the conference. Registration details will be available by the end of April.
  • Presentations will be scheduled in 25 minute sessions (20 minute presentations; 5 minute discussion).
DRF News, Events and Conferences

Event Announcement – Disability Studies in Teacher Education: Tales of Resistance

Event: Centre for Culture & Disability Studies (CCDS) Research Forum *FREE!*

Date: 4th May 2011 ~ 2.15pm – 3.45pm

Venue: Eden 109, Liverpool Hope University, UK. 

Brief Description:  

  • Disability Studies in Teacher Education: Tales of Resistance ~ Laura Waite, CCDS, Faculty of Education, Liverpool Hope University, UK

In UK education the dominant discourse about disabled children remains one of “Special Educational Needs.”  As such, most universities that provide Initial Teacher Education programmes continue to address the education of disabled children within this tradition.  Professional studies curricula are thus broadly based on a medical model of disability, primarily concerned with “fixing” the child that does not fit neatly into the school context.

This situation prompts some important questions:

  • How do students following Professional Studies and Disability Studies reconcile the fundamentally different constructions of learning difficulties–the medical v social models–that underpin these curricula?
  • How do they apply these models to their School-Based Learning experiences?
  • What are the implications (and “costs”) of any resistance to traditional, medical model-based practices in school settings?

Laura Waite outlines the processes and outcomes of a small-scale qualitative study that illuminates how students who are participants in both Initial Teacher Education and Disability Studies programmes experience and reconcile competing disability discourses in their curricula and school based learning. Narrative accounts reveal some of the emotional, intellectual, and practical discomforts experienced in attempts to develop effective and coherent teaching and learning practices. The paper concludes with a discussion of ways in which these findings have implications for curriculum design and teacher-educator development in Higher Education and for the development of appropriate school based learning.

For further information from the organisers, please contact: Dr. David Bolt: boltd@hope.ac.uk

DRF News, Events and Conferences, Majority/Minority Worlds

First Call for Papers for the AfriNEAD 2011 Symposium

Message from The AfriNEAD Team [via DRF member: Tsitsi Chataika]

Dear colleagues,

1)      We are very excited to direct you to the first call for papers for the African Network for Evidence-to-Action on Disability (AfriNEAD) 2011 Symposium which is taking place between 28th – 30th November 2011 at the Elephant Hills Hotel, Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe..

Please visit the website for details and to submit your papers.  Please note that the closing date for submissions is 30 April 2011.

2)      The following mission and vision statements have been temporarily adopted for AfriNEAD and are to be finalised at the 2011 symposium:

  • AfriNEAD’s mission is to be a dynamic disability sector network where there is free and open exchange of ideas and evidence to advance the realisation of equal rights for people with disabilities and to promote action for social inclusion and participation. 
  • AfriNEAD’s vision is to facilitate an integrated, cooperative, evidence-based approach towards realising the rights of people with disabilities in their various communities in order to achieve better quality of life on a day-to-day basis.

 3)      Progress on the development of our AfriNEAD journal is meeting some challenges. While a few uncertainties remain, we are pleased to report the following progress: it will be a Pan-African, open access journal seeking to publish innovative research and reviews in all aspects of Disability with particular emphasis on the African and development context. The first papers should be online within the next few months and the official launch of the journal is planned to take place during the AfriNEAD Symposium 28-30 November 2011.

4)      Work on the AfriNEAD 2009 book is progressing well: we look forward to presenting all delegates attending the 2011 symposium with a copy.

5)      We are also opening a page on the AfriNEAD website for book reviews of any disability-related books.  Please submit your book reviews to: info@afrinead.org

6)      In a first-time collaboration between the Centre for Rehabilitation Studies, AfriNEAD and the University of Stellenbosch Faculty of Theology, a Theology, Disability and Human Dignity Conference is planned to take place 18th – 20th May 2011. Several AfriNEAD members will be participating as special guest speakers. For more information click here (and follow the link to ‘Conferences’).

7)      AfriNEAD intends for its website to serve as a networking tool.  For this to happen we need members to complete and/or update their profiles as fully as possible.  Please do check and update yours by logging-in. Please also check and update your contact details and encourage your other contacts to do so, so that our mailing list can remain up-to-date.

Looking forward to meeting you all in Zimbabwe later this year.