DRF News

CCDS Event: Disability and Queer Friendship in Representations of Doc Holliday and Wyatt Earp ~ Alex Tankard (December, UK)

Event: Centre for Culture & Disability Studies (CCDS) Research Forum 

Date: 7th December 2011: 2.15pm-3.45pm ~ Venue: Eden, 109, Liverpool Hope University, UK. 

Brief Description:

“There was something very peculiar about Doc”: Disability and Queer Friendship in Representations of Doc Holliday and Wyatt Earp

 ~ Alex Tankard (University of Chester, UK)

Nineteenth-century representations of “consumptive” gunslinger Dr John Henry Holliday often expressed admiration rather than censure for his unusually intense devotion to his friends. However, even in the 1880s and 1890s, Holliday was an object of curiosity for newspaper reporters shocked to discover that, as well as being a fearless killer, Holliday was “a victim of consumption” – a disabled man who emphasised rather than concealed his physical delicacy and vulnerability, in the midst of an overwhelmingly violent, macho society. Their expressions of astonishment may hint at an underlying discomfort about Holliday’s status as an aberration of frontier masculinity.

The confusion would only intensify over the decades as these complex representations were reinterpreted and rewritten ever further from their original cultural context. In the second half of the twentieth century, film representations of Holliday demonstrated varying degrees of anxiety and even homophobic suspicion about his friendship with lawman Wyatt Earp. Most films are equally clumsy in their use of Holliday’s incurable illness to explain (and thereby “straighten”) his peculiar willingness to risk his life for Earp, desperately denying the homoerotic possibilities of their relationship and ignoring the more subtle and complex ways in which Holliday’s disability might shape his interaction with other men.

Dr. Tankard will suggest that queerness and disability converge at crucial points in their story, and will discuss the ways in which representations of Holliday as a disabled man who loved other men were censored, rewritten and reimagined by twentieth-century writers and film-makers.

For further information from the organisers, please contact: Dr. David Bolt: boltd@hope.ac.uk

 

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DRF News

Details of next DRF Seminar ~ December 2011 (Sheffield, UK)

DRF Seminar Series: Seminar #3

Date/Time: 6th December 2011 (Tues) 12pm-2pm [followed by Christmas drinks!!]

Venue: Room 10111 in the Arundel Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University (More information on the venue can be found here.)

  • Harriet Cooper (Birkbeck College, University of London): Othering and Ordinariness in Representations of the Physically Impaired Child in Anglo-American Culture in the period 1870-1911

Abstract: Although in recent years scholarship in Victorian and Edwardian Studies has begun to explore the issue of disability, it has tended to deal with questions of disability and gender or disability and work and has rarely focussed specifically on the cultural construction of the physically impaired child. When scholarship has explored the figure of the child, it has mainly examined the role of disability in shaping docile women out of unruly or passionate girls.

In this paper, I look at depictions of physically impaired child in the period from another angle. Texts to be examined include Charlotte Yonge’s The Pillars of the House, E. Nesbit’s Harding’s Luck and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden. Drawing on both the techniques of literary analysis, and on recent scholarship in the field of Childhood Studies, I ask what is specific to representations of impaired children in this period that makes them different from depictions of impaired adults. I consider whether the Victorian impaired child is doubly ‘othered’ by his or her status as a child and as a disabled person, or whether, in fact, the figure of the impaired child is seen as more ‘ordinary’ than the figure of the impaired adult.

I conclude the paper by reflecting on the difficulty of making generalisations about the representation of the impaired child in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Can we say that ‘ordinariness’ is as important as ‘pathology’ as a category for understanding depictions of the physically impaired child at this time?

  • Jenny Slater (Department of Psychology, Manchester Metropolitan University): Time travelling with young disabled people: Developing a queer, crip, critically young, futurist methodology

Abstract: Writing this abstract at the beginning of October, by the time of presentation I will be in the middle of several journeys in which I travel to future best-ever, Utopian, alternative worlds with young disabled people. These journeys will form part of my PhD research. In this paper I return to the present to work through some of the methodological perspectives I endeavour to take when setting out on my exploratory adventures.

Next Seminar: 8th February 2012 (Weds) 1pm-3pm

  • China Mills (Manchester Metropolitan University): Title TBC
  • John Quinn (Department of Politics, University of Sheffield): New Labour and Disability Politics

There are still a few slots available in spring 2012, so if you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar please do get in touch.  Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book on which you’d like to facilitate discussion.  Please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk

DRF News

Event: Educational Review 2011 Guest Lecture ‘Research on Culture in Disability’ (December 2011, UK)

Educational Review is pleased to announce its 2011 Guest Lecture…

Date: Wednesday, 7th December 2011: 5.45pm- (Buffet reception prior to lecture at 5.00pm and drinks reception to follow until 8.00pm)

Venue: Main Lecture Theatre (G12), Birmingham Business School, University of Birmingham, UK

Research on Culture in Disability: Opportunities and Challenges in a World of Differences

  • Speaker: Professor Alfredo Artiles, Arizona State University, USA
  • Respondent: Professor Alan Dyson, University of Manchester, UK

This event is FREE! and open to all staff, students, and members of the public. Please book a place by contacting Sarah McCook, editorial assistant, at s.mccook@bham.ac.uk or 0121 414 4844.

For more information please click here.

DRF News

Reminder: Next DRF Seminar… 16th November (Sheffield, UK)

DRF Seminar Series: Seminar #2

Date/Time: 16th November 2011 (Weds) 2pm-4pm 

Venue: Room 10111 in the Arundel Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University (More information on the venue can be found here.)

  • Manny Madriaga (Sheffield Hallam University): Is seeking the disabled person voice really necessary in empancipatory research?

Abstract: This paper calls for a renewed thinking on emancipatory research when seeking the disabled student ‘voice’ in the arena of higher education.  Drawing on the work of critical race theory, particularly whiteness, disability studies in the United Kingdom recently has been foregrounding the social processes of normalcy.  Normalcy highlights the (re)production of disability in everyday life.  This, of course, raises uncomfortable questions, particularly on the significance of seeking the voice of disabled people. These questions are explored here, reflecting on research that encompassed stories of university support staff and their support of disabled students.

  • Erin Pritchard (Department of Geography, University of Newcastle): Space and time strategies of dwarfs in public space: Body size and rights of access to the built environment

Abstract: In this paper, I aim to explore the experiences of women dwarfs and their encounters with others within the built environment and how space and time affect their experiences and right to access spaces. I argue that a dwarf’s right to access different spaces is affected by both social and spatial barriers which occur during different times and within different spaces. It is argued within this paper that negotiations of everyday spaces – including avoidance due to fear of name-calling – affect a person’s basic rights. More specifically, attention is drawn to the reasons why dwarfs avoid certain areas because of their disability (which in this case is their size) and the ways they respond to particular situations within these spaces. I look at both how the built environment can be inaccessible and also how an attitudinal environment can create inaccessible spaces. Drawing upon recent work by Rosemary Garland Thomson (2011) I intend to show how having a small body results in people becoming ‘misfits’ within society through not fitting the norm both socially and spatially and therefore causing exclusion in various public spaces. This work draws upon ongoing qualitative research with women dwarfs in order to examine their social and spatial experiences and how they negotiate the built environment. The findings from this paper suggest that dwarfs do negotiate the built environment differently often though avoidance of particular spaces and this therefore limits their rights to access spaces.

Next Seminar: 6th December 2011 (Tues) 12pm-2pm

Harriet Cooper (Birkbeck College, University of London): Othering and Ordinariness in Representations of the Physically Impaired Child in Anglo-American Culture in the period 1870-1911

Jenny Slater (Department of Psychology, Manchester Metropolitan University): Time travelling with young disabled people: developing a queer, crip, critically young, futurist methodology

There are still slots available in early 2012, so if you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar please do get in touch.  Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book on which you’d like to facilitate discussion.  Please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk

DRF News

Research Project: Resilience in the Lives of Disabled People ~ Would you like to take part? (UK)

Researchers at Manchester Metropolitan University are working together with Scope on a new research project: Resilience in the lives of disabled people across the life course.  We want to find out what builds resilience in the lives of disabled people. We hope that our findings will help to shape the kinds of services that are delivered for disabled people, so that in the future, services always help disabled people to build resilience and independence.

How to Take Part…

We would like to interview:

  • disabled children;
  • disabled young people;
  • parents/carers of disabled children;
  • disabled people of working age;
  • older disabled people;
  • people with terminal and degenerative conditions.

Interviews usually last between 1 – 2 hours, you can choose where you would like to be interviewed.  Questions we ask might include: 

  • What enables people to fulfil their hopes and dreams?
  • Can you identify people and services that have you have found helpful? Why were they helpful?
  • What helps disabled children and families to persevere in life even when things are getting tough?

If you would like more information about this project and/or to participate, please contact Katherine Runswick-Cole:  k.runswick-cole@mmu.ac.uk

DRF News

Event: ‘Access for All: Incorporating Disability into Emergency Humanitarian Assistance’ (November, UK)

Date: Friday, 11th November 2011: 2pm-4pm 

Venue: Room G.209, lan Turing Building, University of Manchester, M13 9PL, UK. Click here for a map

Brief Description:

‘Access for All: Incorporating Disability into Emergency Humanitarian Assistance’

This seminar is to be hosted by the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute (HCRI) at the University of Manchester, UK and will explore disability and rehabilitation issues during war and humanitarian crises, with a particular focus on Afghanistan and Namibia. 

The speaker is Antony Duttine, the Rehabilitation and Advocacy Officer for Handicap International. 

If you would like to attend and/or for further information, please email Jessica Field (on jessica.field-2@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk by Friday 4th November 2011 at the latest as places are very limited and are being allocated on a first come, first served basis.