DRF News

Third Keynote Announced for Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane Conference (Sheffield, UK: Sept. 2013)

Debating whether you should attend the Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane: 4th International Conference at Sheffield Hallam University (September 3rd-4th 2013)?

Here is another good reason to come, as we are thrilled to announce our third keynote speaker…

 

Prof. Tom Billington, (Professor of Educational and Child Psychology, School of Education, University of Sheffield, UK) will be discussing….

Time, Space, Mind: Narratives of Quality and Experience

 

Abstract: This paper explores non-deficit conceptualizations of mind which are drawn from philosophy (Bergson), psychoanalysis (Bion) and neuroscience (Damasio). Discourses of mind are constructed which are dynamic – ‘mind as process’ – and not restricted to mechanistic accounts of the brain or indeed any individual psychopathology, for example, autism. Theorizations are explored and illustrated by accounts of case work conducted with young people, their parents and teachers both in schools and the family courts.

Bio: Tom is Professor of Educational and Child Psychology as well as Director of the Centre for the Study of Children, Families and Learning Communities at the University of Sheffield.  Much of Tom’s research focuses on the professional practices of Educational and Child Psychologists, in particular, the nature of work conducted with children and young people and the theoretical bases upon which practice is justified. He has published extensively in this area and has for many years sought to inform the development of practitioner assessments and interventions which are both ethical and effective through expanding the base of research evidence beyond reductionist psychopathologies. In particular, he has been locating Educational Psychology within the context of a much broader critical theoretical framework (Billington, 1997).

Tom has specialized in qualitative research methodologies, especially discourse analytic, psychodynamic and narrative approaches in individual case work with children and young people, their families and schools. Of particular concern is the power of psychological discourses as exercised by practitioners, focusing on fundamental questions as to how we go about our work; for example, `how do we speak of children? How do we speak with children? How do we write about children? How do we listen to children? How do we listen to ourselves (when working with children)? (Billington, 2006).

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Keep up to date via the Normalcy 2013 page on the DRF blog: https://disabilityresearchforum.wordpress.com/events/normalcy-2013/, join the debate on twitter #normalcy2013 and, remember, to book a place at the conference, please visit normalcy2013.eventbrite.co.uk

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