DRF News

Disability Studies Postdoctorate Research Associate Position at the University Of Sheffield (UK)

Job Reference Number: UOS007678

Job Title: Post-doctoral Research Associate

Contract Type: Fixed term until 31 December 2016

Faculty: Faculty of Social Sciences

Department: School of Education

Salary: Grade 7

£28,972 – £36,661 per annum

Closing Date: 8th January 2014

 

This Post-doctorate Research Associate will work with Professors Dan Goodley and Elizabeth Wood and other colleagues across the Social Sciences, Humanities and Medicine, to develop a newly identified programme of inter-disciplinary research entitled ‘Transforming Disability, Culture and Childhood: Local, Global and Transdisciplinary Responses’. The successful post-holder will work with a number of academic colleagues in the Centre for the Study of Childhood and Youth to develop the theoretical, research and funding capabilities of a research programme comprised of three research strands:

Strand 1: Early Years (birth-5 years) Disability Diagnoses: Cultural Perspectives, Beliefs and Experiences in the Early Years.

Strand 2: Children (5-16 years) Disability Dealings: Working with Children as Critical Practitioners.

Strand 3: Young People (16 – 24 years) Disability Discourses: Analysing Emotionality and Psychologisation.

 

Applicants should hold a good first degree and a PhD in a relevant discipline (or equivalent) and have experience of undertaking qualitative research and a good track record of publications. Previous experience and skills in inter-disciplinary research is desirable

More Info here.

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DRF News

PhD Studentship Opportunities at the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York (UK)

White Rose DTC ESRC Networks promote collaboration across the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York.  The intention is to support interdisciplinary research excellence and develop critical mass in key areas of research with the aim of building long-term research partnerships between the White Rose Universities.

Title of network: Complexity and Disabled Selfhood: An Inter-Disciplinary White Rose Network

 Each studentship is tenable from Session 2014 and will provide Home/EU tuition fees and a maintenance grant paid at standard Research Council rates. It is expected that the student appointed to the project will liaise with both supervisors at least 6 times a year. Applicants for these studentships will be expected to hold a UK Upper Second Class Honours degree or equivalent.

For further information, contact the named supervisor below:

Academic lead
Name: Professor Alan Roulstone
Department/School: Sociology and Social Policy
University: University of Leeds
Tel: 0113 3434434
Email Address: a.roulstone@leeds.ac.uk

STUDENTSHIP ONE – Imagining Work: Disabled Young People, Narratives on the Boundaries of Work and Welfare

Principal Supervisor
Name: Professor Alan Roulstone
Department/School: Sociology and Social Policy
University: University of Leeds
Tel:01133434434
Email: a.roulstone@leeds.ac.uk

Co-Supervisor: Professor Peter Dwyer
Current position: Professor of Social Policy University of York

STUDENTSHIP TWO – Contesting neoliberal education and able citizenship: Some postconventionalist alternatives

Principal Supervisor:
Name: Professor Dan Goodley
Department/School: Education
University: University of Sheffield
Tel: 0114 222 8185
Email: d.goodley@sheffield.ac.uk

Co-supervisor:
Name: Dr Angharad Beckett
Department/School: Sociology and Social Policy
University: University of Leeds
Tel:0113 343 4409
Email: a.e.beckett@leeds.ac.uk

STUDENTSHIP THREE – Overcoming the Barriers: Including People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities in Research

Principal Supervisor:
Name: Prof Celia Kitzinger
Department/School:Sociology
University: York
Tel:07872472740
Email: celia.kitzinger@york.ac.uk

Co-Supervisor: Dr Kathy Boxall
Current position: Lecturer in Social Work

Disability Studies and..., Events and Conferences

Call for Ideas: Gender and Disability: Asking Difficult Questions (10th May 2014, Sheffield, UK)

Announcing Gender and Disability: Asking Difficult Questions

Saturday 10th May 2014, Interdisciplinary Centre of the Social Sciences (ICOSS), University of Sheffield

We’re calling for activists, artists, academics and practitioners to get involved in a day of discussions on the theme of gender and dis/ability. We welcome ideas for the sharing of skills and stories, art, performances, poetry, workshops, round-table discussions, papers and presentations.

The event aims to create a space for conversations and debate between communities who share an interest in gender and disability.

Some ideas for topics/themes:

(Dis)ableism, discrimination, exclusion and (in)accessibility
‘Abnormal’, ‘Normal’ and Normalcy
Activism and protest (disability, feminist, LGBT, ‘race’, queer)
Austerity/welfare cuts
Body image, fetishisation, and the medicalization of bodies and minds
Desire, Sexuality, intimacy and relationships
Freakery, the abject and the politics of disgust
Health and Illness
Identities and identity politics
Life-course and ageing
Mental health and mad pride
Post-humanism
Queer and crip histories
Sex, sex educators and sex workers

Send us your ideas (around 200 words or half a page of bullet points) by 24th February 2014 to gender.disability@shef.ac.uk.

This will be a free event. Food will be available to buy at the venue. We want to make this event as accessible as possible, to inform us of any particular access requirements please email gender.disability@shef.ac.uk by 19th April 2014. For further information please contact gender.disability@shef.ac.uk. To book a place please go to: http://genderanddisability.wordpress.com.

Twitter: @GenDisability

An event hosted by the Disability Research Forum, Sheffield Hallam University and the Gender Research Network, University of Sheffield

Please distribute widely! Link to flyer here: Gender And Disability Call for Ideas

DRF News

Event: Disability History Lecture (12th Dec 2013: Leuven, Belgium)

We have the pleasure to pass on an invitation to the IVth disability history lecture.

This time Josephine Hoegaerts will take you on an intriguing journey entitled: “To guard the public speaker from physical disability: Vocal practices and acoustic constructions of the able body in the long nineteenth century“. An abstract of her talk can be found below.

Mark the date: 12th December 2013 from 16 until 18 o’clock in the heart of Leuven (Belgium).

In case you cannot attend or would like to have access to recordings of previous lectures just click on the following link: http://www.disabilityhistorylectureseries.wordpress.com

If you would like to receive some more information about this lecture or the lecture series, please do not hesitate to contact pieter.verstraete@ppw.kuleuven.be

Abstract: Disability is often conceptualized in visual terms: its historical presence is imagined as a paradoxical situation of invisibility (in the historical record, and in most historical work), and of a simultaneous conspicuousness (according to Garland-Thomson, “the history of disabled people in the world is in part the history of being on display”). Especially in the nineteenth century, the story of disability is one of increasing scrutiny as disabled people became subject to not only casual stares, but also the medical gaze and the disciplining institutional gaze. To afford these gazed upon historical actors more agency, vocal metaphors abound: researchers have strived to “give a voice” to those forgotten by conventional history, or to simply “speak up”. While analyses of the hierarchic gaze and practices of gaining voice have debunked modern notions of the disabled body, they also seem to relegate disabled agency to the voice – and therefore run the risk of buying into what Jonathan Sterne has called the ‘audiovisual litany’ in which the powerful, rational world of the eye is juxtaposed with the more somatic, emotional sound of the powerless.

In this lecture, I will try to turn the metaphoric audiovisual litany on its head by focusing on those disabilities that were only audible. Vocal impairments (such as aphasia, dysphonia and stuttering) have an ambiguous relation to the body: they only manifest themselves during the act of speaking, and are therefore necessarily ‘performative’. Through speech impediments, a more fluid notion of disability presents itself, which calls attention to the necessity and inherent danger of the constant performance of vocal ‘ability’, and also problematizes the practice of ‘speaking up’ against the (medical) gaze.

DRF News

PhD Opportunities – ‘Biohybrid Human Network’ @ Univ. of Sheffield

Multidisciplinary PhDs in Social Science, Humanities, Bioscience and Engineering: Biohybrid Human Network

Deadline for applications: 17th January 2014; Entry date: 1st October 2014

***project 5 and 6 might be of particular interest to disability studies peeps***

Background: Rapid developments in bioengineering, computer science, psychology, and biomedicine are leading to increasing levels of interaction between humans and emerging biotechnologies in a wide range of settings from the clinic to the classroom. The use of these new technologies takes many forms, including implants, prosthetics, drugs and devices that modify or augment the body, and at the same time create new forms of individual and collective identity. These changes challenge both existing scientific and cultural categories and blur the boundaries between natural, social, and synthetic objects. The blurring of these boundaries raises important issues such as at what point does biology become artefact and technology become alive? In our increasingly biohybrid world, what does it mean to be living? And what does it mean to be human? The goal of the Biohybrid Human Network is to understand both the interactions and the distinctions between what we are and what we create, and to improve how we interact with our inventions. It involves academics from across the University of Sheffield and is initially focussed around three core research themes; i) biohybrid systems, ii) biohybrid individuals, iii) biohybrid societies. 

We aim to create a cohort of PhD students who will work with the Biohybrid community to unite the pure and social sciences, medicine, engineering, and the arts. This requires flexible individuals with a range of backgrounds who will learn from each other and gain a wide range of research skills and enhanced interdisciplinary knowledge.   We welcome applications from students who should have or expect to achieve an undergraduate honours degree at 2.1 or higher in a relevant field e.g. in computer science, cognitive science, Ecology, environmental engineering, neuroscience, psychology, social science or humanities. Students will receive a scholarship which will cover tuition fees at UK/EU rate and an annual stipend equivalent at the standard RCUK rate for 3 years full-time.

Projects available through the network:

  1. Communicating with the environment through artificial ears: Perception of emotion in speech and music by cochlear implant users (Renee Timmers,r.timmers@sheffield.ac.uk; Department of Music).
  2. Synthetic ecology: Engineering natural system (Jags Pandhal,j.pandhal@sheffield.ac.uk; Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering).
  3. Towards an embodied model of multimodal musical learning (Stuart Wilson,s.p.wilson@sheffield.ac.uk; Department of Psychology).
  4. Modelling the (biohybrid) human using ‘living machines (Paul Martin,paul.martin@sheffield.ac.uk; Department of Sociological Studies).
  5. Posthuman, enhanced and lacking bodies: Rethinking the human (Dan Goodley,d.goodley@sheffield.ac.uk; School of Education).
  6. Posthumanism, migrant and dis/abled bodies (Nishat Awan,n.awan@sheffield.ac.uk; School of Architecture).

Potential applicants are encouraged to contact the lead supervisor(s) directly to discuss and develop a project idea that interests them. Formal applications including a 3 page summary of the project idea (developed in collaboration with the lead supervisor), CV (with reference details – we will NOT contact your referees; it is your responsibility to request references and ensure we receive them), and degree transcripts (if available) should be submitted to the lead supervisor of the project you are interested in by 17thJanuary 2014.

The advert is live at: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/postgraduate/research/scholarships/projects/biohybrid

DRF News

Reminder: Next DRF Seminar – Mon. 9th Dec (10am-12pm)

When: Monday, 9th December 2013: 10am-12pm

Where: Arundel Room 10111 (SHU) [the Arundel Building = 122 Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB.  For a map of City Campus click here.]

Everyone welcome!

Slot 1: Sue Chantler (Independent Scholar, UK): Is this inclusive?: Teachers Resisting Narratives of Normalcy within the Classroom

Abstract: The paper is based on the findings from a study in which I worked with a group of primary school teachers through a process of reflection-on-practice in the context of educational inclusion for children with the label autism.  Titchkosky (2011) argues that current notions of access and inclusion within social institutions, for example schools, are predicated on the notion of the disabled individual as the ‘problem’. Within neoliberal conceptions of education and childhood there is a ‘cultural imperative to fit in, under a rubric of normality, to strive to be normal’ Goodley (2011, p146 citing Davis 1995); disabled students have to prove themselves against ‘normate standards’ of competence (Biklen 2002). The process of school performativity perpetuates a model of education which problematises children whom it is unable to ‘normalise’.  The teachers in the study frequently identified the ‘problem’ with regard to educational inclusion as the system of education itself: the curriculum, the class sizes, the lack of effective and timely professional development, and the attitude of some teachers towards their work and towards children who do not conform to the stereotypical ‘norm’.  Their perspectives reveal some of the ways in which teachers resist the process of ‘normalcy’ within the classroom.

Slot 2: Emma Spring (English Federation of Disability Sport): Findings from a Recent Report

Abstract: The English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) is the strategic lead in sport and physical activity for disabled people in England. Our vision is that disabled people are active for life. Part of EFDS’s work is to champion opportunities for disabled people to enjoy sport, supporting the sport and physical activity sectors to be more inclusive.  To achieve our vision, we work with various stakeholders. They include National Governing Bodies of sport (NGBs) and National Disability Sport Organisations (NDSOs) to increase

EFDS have conducted research designed to gain a better understanding of disabled people’s lifestyles, not just about their sporting habits, but how sport does or does not fit into their livelihood.  By understanding more about disabled people’s lifestyles in general, we can start to understand the trigger points, motivational drivers and their likely sustainability. Rather than disabled people grouped generally by their impairment or other key demographics, they can be grouped by their motivations. Then, offers for these groups can be designed more appropriately and engage more disabled people based on their needs, rather than other factors.  This presentation will deliver some of the results from this report, highlighting what this means for disability sport.