DRF News

Reminder: Next DRF Seminar – Mon. 9th Dec (10am-12pm)

When: Monday, 9th December 2013: 10am-12pm

Where: Arundel Room 10111 (SHU) [the Arundel Building = 122 Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB.  For a map of City Campus click here.]

Everyone welcome!

Slot 1: Sue Chantler (Independent Scholar, UK): Is this inclusive?: Teachers Resisting Narratives of Normalcy within the Classroom

Abstract: The paper is based on the findings from a study in which I worked with a group of primary school teachers through a process of reflection-on-practice in the context of educational inclusion for children with the label autism.  Titchkosky (2011) argues that current notions of access and inclusion within social institutions, for example schools, are predicated on the notion of the disabled individual as the ‘problem’. Within neoliberal conceptions of education and childhood there is a ‘cultural imperative to fit in, under a rubric of normality, to strive to be normal’ Goodley (2011, p146 citing Davis 1995); disabled students have to prove themselves against ‘normate standards’ of competence (Biklen 2002). The process of school performativity perpetuates a model of education which problematises children whom it is unable to ‘normalise’.  The teachers in the study frequently identified the ‘problem’ with regard to educational inclusion as the system of education itself: the curriculum, the class sizes, the lack of effective and timely professional development, and the attitude of some teachers towards their work and towards children who do not conform to the stereotypical ‘norm’.  Their perspectives reveal some of the ways in which teachers resist the process of ‘normalcy’ within the classroom.

Slot 2: Emma Spring (English Federation of Disability Sport): Findings from a Recent Report

Abstract: The English Federation of Disability Sport (EFDS) is the strategic lead in sport and physical activity for disabled people in England. Our vision is that disabled people are active for life. Part of EFDS’s work is to champion opportunities for disabled people to enjoy sport, supporting the sport and physical activity sectors to be more inclusive.  To achieve our vision, we work with various stakeholders. They include National Governing Bodies of sport (NGBs) and National Disability Sport Organisations (NDSOs) to increase

EFDS have conducted research designed to gain a better understanding of disabled people’s lifestyles, not just about their sporting habits, but how sport does or does not fit into their livelihood.  By understanding more about disabled people’s lifestyles in general, we can start to understand the trigger points, motivational drivers and their likely sustainability. Rather than disabled people grouped generally by their impairment or other key demographics, they can be grouped by their motivations. Then, offers for these groups can be designed more appropriately and engage more disabled people based on their needs, rather than other factors.  This presentation will deliver some of the results from this report, highlighting what this means for disability sport.

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