DRF News

Job Opp: Lecturing Jobs at Liverpool Hope

Liverpool Hope University is currently advertising two Disability Studies-related jobs: more information can be found on the following links.

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Education SEN & Disability –  http://www.hope.ac.uk/jobs/lslecturerineducationsendisability/

Post Doctoral Teaching Fellow in Education (Four Posts Available) – http://www.hope.ac.uk/jobs/postdoctoralteachingfellowineducation-2aeds/

DRF News

Reminder: Next DRF Seminar – Wed. 11th Feb (2pm-4pm)

When: Tuesday, 11th February 2014: 2pm-4pm – Arundel 10111 (SHU)

Where: Arundel Room 10111 (SHU) [the Arundel Building = 122 Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB.  For a map of City Campus click here.]

Everyone welcome!

Slot 1: Andreas Dimopoulos (Brunel University, UK): Police and Disability: Legal and Policy Considerations from the Social Model and British Sign Language

Abstract: In a recent case from the European Court of Human Rights, Dordevic v Croatia, the ECtHR held that Croatian police violated Art. 3 ECHR, because the police failed to protect a person with intellectual disabilities and his mother from disability harassment. The similarities with Fiona Pilkington’s case are striking. In UK law, Z v Police Commissioner for the Metropolis  and Finnigan v Northumbria Police raise some important issues as to how the police address issues of disability. I will briefly discuss these cases in order to argue that the duty to promote equality under the Equality Act 2010 requires a stronger application through the social model of disability: the police has to be able to assess and be responsive to the specific needs of the person with disabilities. In the case of Finnigan this required the use of British Sign Language. I argue that the benefits of wide use of languages such as BSL, or Makaton are not fully appreciated by policy.

Slot 2: Dianne Theakstone (University of Stirling, UK): Title TBC

…currently researching to what extent the governance structures in Scotland and Norway facilitate or impede disabled peoples’ access to independent living.

Upcoming events you might be interested in:

DRF News

CFP: CAMHS 2014 Conference (Children and Young People’s Mental Health) – Northampton, UK: July, 2014

Event:  CAMHS 2014 Conference (Children and Young People’s Mental Health)

Theme: Learning from the Past, Looking to the Future

Date: 2-4 July 2014

Venue: Park Campus, University of Northampton, UK 

First call for papers: Following on from the successful 2013 Child and Adolescent Mental Health, this 3 day conference aims to provide a space in which professionals and academics can explore research, theory and practice in child and adolescent mental health. It is an opportunity to reflect on and critique established research, policy and practice, to share and celebrate what works, and to explore solutions to the challenges of the future.

Papers, posters, workshops, symposia and other contributions are invited that engage the conference theme. Some suggestions of possible focuses include:

  • Promoting mental health
  • Critical perspectives in children’s mental health
  • Widening access to CAMH services
  • Social relationships, mental health and wellbeing
  • Cultural issues in CAMHS
  • Innovations in CAMHS
  • Outcomes monitoring
  • Mental Health policy
  • Gender and sexualities
  • Working with families
  • Mental health in schools
  • • Early Interventions and many more

Keynote Speakers

Kathryn Pugh: Kathryn is the Programme Lead for Children and Young People’s IAPT. She has managed the programme since its inception in January 2011.  Her first job in the NHS was in primary care, moving to commissioning primary, secondary and specialist care in both acute and mental health. She joined YoungMinds to run SOS project for 16-25s and became Head of Policy and Innovation, leading for the Mental Health Alliance and Children’s Charities on lobbying to change the Mental Health Act to reflect the needs of children and young people, including amendments to prevent inappropriate admission of under 18s to adult mental health wards.

Kathryn joined the National CAMHS Support Service as a CAMHS Regional Development Worker in London and simultaneously worked for first NIMHE then NMHDU as National Lead for the Children and Young People’s Programme implementing the MHA 2007, then ran the joint NCSS NMHDU MH Transitions programme.

Professor Peter Fonagy, PhD, FBA, OBE: Peter is National Clinical Lead of Children and Young People’s Improving Access to Psychological Therapies and Director of UCL Partners’ Mental Health and Well-Being Programme.

Professor Peter Smith: Peter is Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Unit for School and Family Studies at Goldsmiths College, University of London. His research interests include social development in the home and school; play; aggression and bullying in childhood; cyberbullying; and the similarities and differences between bullying in western countries, Japan, and South Korea.

Dr Katherine Runswick-Cole: Katherine is a Senior Research Fellow in Disability Studies and Psychology, at Manchester Metropolitan University. Katherine’s research has mainly focused on the lives of disabled children and their families and draws on a critical disability studies perspective.

Professor Arlene Vetere: Arlene is professor of family therapy and systemic practice at Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, Norway, and affiliate professor of family studies, in the department of family studies, Malta University.  Arlene retired from her post as professor of clinical psychology at Surrey University in December, 2013 in order to spend more time writing. Her latest book is edited with Miochael Tarren-Sweeney, The Mental Health Needs of Vulnerable Children, published by Routledge, 2014. She has co-written ‘Systemic Therapy and Attachment Narratives’ with Rudi Dallos, 2009, Routledge.

Peter Stratton: Peter is Emeritus Professor of Family Therapy at the Leeds Family Therapy & Research Centre.

Submission for the First Call for Papers are invited. The closing date for the first call is 16 March 2014. You are welcome to submit either individual papers, symposia, or workshop proposals, as well as abstracts for posters. Please complete the abstract submission form.

Authors submitting their abstract for the first call for papers should expect a response from the panel by no later than 11 April 2014. This will enable them to take advantage of the Early Bird registration for the conference.

Second call for papers: The deadline for the second call for papers is 12 May 2014

Information regarding registration can be found here.

Please note that, as with all academic conferences, it is expected that speakers register for at least the day on which they are presenting. This facilitates shared learning, which is a key aim of the conference.

Contact us: please email: camhs@northampton.ac.uk

DRF News

Event: ‘Listening to dis/abled children in research’ w/Katherine Runswick-Cole (Feb 2014: SHU, UK)

Date: Thursday February 20th 2014

Venue: Stoddart Building, Room 7330 http://www.shu.ac.uk/university/visit/find-us/plancity.html. at Sheffield Hallam University, UK.  

Time: Refreshments will be available from 4.00pm and the seminar will begin at 4.30pm. Latest end time will be 6.30pm.

The Equality, Diversity and Social Justice Research group presents a seminar by Dr. Katherine Runswick-Cole (Manchester Metropolitan University, UK)

Title: Listening to dis/abled children in research: Thinking about policy and practice

Abstract: Listening to the voice of the child has long been a key concern of practitioners, policy makers and researchers.  And yet, children and young people continue to report that they are not being listened to when important decisions are made about their lives (HMSO, 2013).  These challenges are often magnified in the lives of disabled children whose lives are often pushed to the margins as they are excluded from the category of children ‘able’ to give their views (Curran and Runswick-Cole, 2013).  In this presentation, I will reflect on the joys and challenges of listening to children’s views in the research process.  The paper draws on examples from two recently completed research projects (Does Every Child Matter, post-Blair?  The interconnections of disabled childhoods, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, 2008 – 2011; Resilience in the lives of disabled people across the life course, funded by Scope, 2011-2013) as well as from two books (Currran & Runswick-Cole, 2013; Mallett and Runswick-Cole, 2014) in order to consider how a dialogue between research, policy and practice might open up opportunities for listening to children.

References

  • Curran, T. and Runswick-Cole, K. (2013) Disabled Children’s Childhood Studies: critical perspectives in a global context, London: Palgrave MacMillan.
  • HMSO (2013) Children and Families Bill, London: HMSO.
  • Mallett, R. and Runswick-Cole, K. (2014) Approaching Disability: critical issues and perspectives, Abingdon: Routledge.

Katherine is Senior Research Fellow in Disability Studies and Psychology at the Research Institute for Health and Social Change at Manchester Metropolitan University  http://www.rihsc.mmu.ac.uk/staff/profile.php?surname=Runswick-Cole&name=Katherine

Attendance is FREE! but space will be limited so if intending to come please email Ian Chesters at i.chesters@shu.ac.uk