DRF News

Pacific Rim International Conference (May, 2015: Hawaii, USA)

from… the organisers of the Pacific Rim International Conference (May, 2015: Hawaii, USA)

 

“For our 31st edition, Pac Rim is merging and partnering with another conference, so there is sure to be plenty of surprises! 

The Pacific Rim International Conference, considered one of the most ‘diverse gatherings’ in the world, encourages and respects voices from “diverse” perspective across numerous areas, including: voices from persons representing all disability areas; experiences of family members and supporters across all disability and diversity areas; responsiveness to diverse cultural and language differences; evidence of researchers and academics studying diversity and disability; stories of persons providing powerful lessons; examples of program providers, and; action plans to meet human and social needs in a globalized world.

In 2015, new topic areas will promote thoughtful discussion and suggest new ways to integrate education, technology, advocacy, activism and interdisciplinary research. We all strive to strengthen communities and enhance the lives of all human beings. Together, we can harness the tremendous synergy generated by the intermingling and cross-fertilization of diverse perspectives, and ‘spread the word’ as we continue our professional and personal life journey.

Take your first steps to the islands by visiting the website: www.pacrim.hawaii.edu.

We welcome your ideas, suggestions and enthusiasm. Then join us in Waikiki, Hawaii, May 18 & 19, 2015.”

 

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DRF News, Spain

Event Announcement: “The Radicalisation of Care: Practices, Politics and Infrastructures” (Nov, 2014: Spain)

Title: “The Radicalisation of Care: Practices, Politics and Infrastructures” 

Dates: 19th – 20th November 2014

Venue: William J. Mitchell room (7th floor), MediaTIC building. Roc Boronat, 117, Barcelona, Spain.

Topic: The concept of radicalisation is usually associated to a process by which groups or individuals come to adopt increasingly extreme or immoderate positions, ideals or aspirations. But it also speaks of the attempts at introducing fundamental or far-reaching changes in a certain area or field. Drawing on this second meaning, in this workshop we aim to explore a series of trends that lead us to think that we might be facing a process of radicalisation of care.

Organising team: Daniel López, Israel Rodríguez Giralt & Tomás Sánchez Criado. Open University of Catalonia

Speakers: Madeleine Akrich, Blanca Callén, Jérôme Denis & David Pontille, Rob Imrie, Joanna Latimer, Daniel López, Andrew Power, Tomás Sánchez Criado, Vololona Rabeharisoa, Israel Rodríguez Giralt, Celia Roberts, Manuel Tironi & Myriam Winance.

Graphic report by Carla Boserman

Sponsored by: LaCaixa Internationalisation at Home 2014.

The event is free, although registration is needed.

All information available here: http://radicare.net

‪#‎radicare

DRF News

CFP: 10th International Conference on Child and Adolescent Psychopathology

10th International Conference on Child and Adolescent Psychopathology

Start Date: 20 July 2015 – End Date: 22 July 2015

Venue: Whitelands College, University of Roehampton, London, UK

The goal of this interdisciplinary conference is to present and discuss the state-of-the-art information on various aspects of Child and Adolescent Psychopathology. The conference will be of interest to those who are doing research with young people and to those working within child and adolescent mental health, education, social work and youth justice systems.

Keynote Speakers:

Dr Graeme Fairchild (University of Southampton): “Using a family design to study risk and resilience factors in the aetiology of Conduct Disorder”

Dr Eamon McCrory (University College London): “Biological embedding: How childhood maltreatment gets under the skin”

Dr Alice Gregory (Goldsmiths College, University of London): “The genetics of sleep disorders”

Dr Paul G Ramchandani (Imperial College London): “Getting in early to prevent mental health problems in children”

Dr Luci Wiggs (Oxford Brookes University): “Management of sleep disturbance in young people”

Prof Cecilia A Essau (University of Roehampton): “Mental health problems across cultures: Implications for intervention”

Call for Papers and Research Symposia

Abstracts for oral and poster presentations are warmly invited on any of the following themes:

(1) Assessment, prevention, and treatment of child and adolescent psychopathology;

(2) General issues (risk and protective factors, use of mental health services, different approaches to mental health services delivery);

(3) Cross cultural issues in child and adolescent psychopathology.

 

Abstract Submission Deadline: 15th May 2015

 

More Information: To find out more about the conference and to submit your abstract and register for the conference, please go to

http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/Research-Centres/Centre-for-Applied-Research-and-Assessment-in-Child-and-Adolescent-Wellbeing/Child-and-Adolescent-Psychopathology-Conference/

or contact: Professor Cecilia A. Essau

Department of Psychology, University of Roehampton, Whitelands College, Holybourne Avenue, London SW15 4JD, UK

Email: C.Essau@roehampton.ac.uk

Tel: +44 (0) 20 8392 3647

Fax: +44 (0) 20 8392 3527

DRF News, Uncategorized

CFP: Rethinking Disability on Screen: A One-Day Interdisciplinary Symposium (May, 2014)

Rethinking Disability on Screen: A One-Day Interdisciplinary Symposium

Date: Thursday 14th May, 2015, 

Venue: Humanities Research Centre, University of York

Website: rethinkingdisabilityonscreen.com

Twitter: @rdos2015

*** Deadline for abstracts: 16th January 2015 ***

 Keynote speakers: Stuart Murray, Professor of Contemporary Literatures and Film and Director of the Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities and Justin Edgar, Filmmaker and Founder and Creative Director of 104 Films (www.104films.com)

Cinema’s visual interest in disability registered almost from the moment of its invention. The historical tendencies of fiction film to show disabled subjects as objects of pity or comedy, as ‘monstrous’, as ‘resentful’ or as segregated from mainstream society have been critically documented from the 1980s onwards, but more recently, a number of international films featuring disability – Les Intouchables, AmourRust and BoneThe Sessions – have enjoyed both critical and commercial success.

Alongside TV coverage of the London-hosted 2012 Paralympics on Channel 4, UK terrestrial programming has addressed disability across a range of genres, from drama (Best of Men, BBC2) through comedy-sitcom (Derek, Channel 4) and social documentary (The UndateablesBodyshock, Channel 4), to mixed receptions. Such developments call for a re-examination of representations of disability on screen and their contribution to ongoing cultural, social, economic and political debates surrounding disability. This one-day interdisciplinary symposium at the University of York aims to unite postgraduates, early career researchers, established scholars and industry practitioners working across a range of fields and disciplines – including film studies, history, literature, cultural studies, gender studies, sociology and health sciences – to explore the ways in which cinema and television have reflected, and shaped, subjective and objective experiences of impairment and disability throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

We invite contributions in the form of 20-minute papers on a range of topics and genres, encompassing both fiction and non-fiction materials, as well as analyses of disability in production and reception contexts. The event will be underpinned by a number of key critical questions:

 

 – How visible is disability throughout the history of cinema and television? In what screen contexts is disability present? When has it been occluded, marginalised or suppressed?

 – What specific forms of disability has cinema embraced? Which has it neglected or rejected?

 – To what extent have cinema and television engaged with the emotional, physical and social implications of impairment and disability?

 – What forms of spectatorship do screen representations of disability construct/ presume?

 – How have representations of disability on screen changed over time? How much progress has been made, and what further directions should this take?

 

Our aims are to facilitate constructive, interdisciplinary conversations on existing scholarship, to discuss new avenues of enquiry and to promote interest and growth in this important but relatively under-studied area.

Presentation topics could include, but are not restricted to:

– disability, sexuality and romance

– disability and exceptionality

– isolation and integration

– dependence, independence, interdependence

– disability and genre (comedy, satire, romance, melodrama, thriller, documentary  soap, reality, children’s film and TV, animation, science-fiction, period drama, medical film)

– disability and film-making (able-bodied and disabled actors, directors and producers, disability activism in the entertainment industry)

– commercials, advertising and promotional material

– spectatorship and reception

– discursive exchanges between the fields of disability studies and film studies, past, present and future.

 

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be emailed to rethinkingdisabilityonscreen@gmail.com by Friday 16th January, together with a brief biographical note (100-150 words).

 

A number of travel bursaries, primarily for postgraduate students and ECRs from the White Rose Consortium and the Northern Network for Medical Humanities (nnmh.org.uk), may be available. Details of how to apply will be announced in due course.

Uncategorized

Reminder: First DRF Seminar of 2014-2015

Date: Wednesday 22nd October 2014

Time: 11am-12pm ***please note the change in start time***

Venue: Room 100009 (Arundel Building, SHU)

Presenter: Lauran Doak, Sheffield Hallam University: Augmentative & Alternative Communication: is there a ‘best fit’ model of disability?

Abstract: Augmentative & Alternative Communication (AAC) is a field of educational and clinical practice which aims to provide preverbal individuals with a means to augment or replace spoken language.  Depending on the individual’s abilities and requirements, this may involve manual signing, graphic symbols, communication boards, eye-gaze technology, or speech-generating devices.  With regard to models of disability, Gustavsson (2004) provides a useful overview of four broad schools of thought: individual essentialism (the ‘medical model’); contextual essentialism (the ‘social model’); constructionism (related to Cultural Disability Studies) and relative interactionism.  At present there is very little theoretical discussion of the relationship between AAC and the first three, although multiple authors have converged on the possibility of situating AAC within the fourth category of relative interactionism. In this presentation I will explore the possible relationship between AAC provision and each theoretical approach to disability.

Uncategorized

Disability Research Forum 2014-15 Seminar Schedule (and call for presenters)

The DRF blog (launched in Sept 2010) now has 1370 subscribers from across the globe. As a virtual network of disability scholars, researchers, disabled people and disability activists it has established itself as the place to be.

Today, we are pleased to announce the seminar schedule for 2014-2015. More information on the venue can be found here. Please note, although the bulding is the same as usual, some slots differ from our regular room. We’d also like to take this opportunity to remind all presenters of the Accessible Presenting Info here.

As you’ll see, there are still slots available. If you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar (slots available are shown below) please do get in touch. For that, or any other questions, please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk or Jenny Slater: j.slater@shu.ac.uk

We will be updating the timetable as we go along – so please watch this space (you can sign up to email alerts in the box on the right hand side of this webpage, and also follow us on Twitter @shudisability).

Wednesday 22nd October, 10-12, Room 100009

Slot 1: *** Available ***

Slot 2: Lauran Doak, Sheffield Hallam University: Augmentative & Alternative Communication: is there a ‘best fit’ model of disability?

Abstract: Augmentative & Alternative Communication (AAC) is a field of educational and clinical practice which aims to provide preverbal individuals with a means to augment or replace spoken language.  Depending on the individual’s abilities and requirements, this may involve manual signing, graphic symbols, communication boards, eye-gaze technology, or speech-generating devices.  With regard to models of disability, Gustavsson (2004) provides a useful overview of four broad schools of thought: individual essentialism (the ‘medical model’); contextual essentialism (the ‘social model’); constructionism (related to Cultural Disability Studies) and relative interactionism.  At present there is very little theoretical discussion of the relationship between AAC and the first three, although multiple authors have converged on the possibility of situating AAC within the fourth category of relative interactionism. In this presentation I will explore the possible relationship between AAC provision and each theoretical approach to disability.

Thursday 20th November, 12-2, Room 10111

Slot 1: John Rees, Independent Scholar: Care – essence of our being?

Abstract: Care: a philosophical and political concept that is consciously acted upon in life – why do we care? We have the word that completes the thoughts that with that word we shape our practice. Our practice then completes that process in which thought is enriched and is completed into a rich and engaging intervention into the lives of others, a dialectic of love precisely because of the contradictions thrown up by care under the rule of capital.

Slot 2:  Jill Smith, Sheffield Hallam University: Imagining otherwise for autistic children’s play

Abstract: TBC

Wednesday 10th December, 10-12, Room 100009

Slot 1: ***Available***

Slot 2: ***Available***

Tuesday 10th February, 2-4, Room 10111

Slot 1: ***Available***

Slot 2: ***Available***

Wednesday 25th March, 1-3, Room 10111

Slot 1: Kirsty Liddiard, University of Sheffield: Title TBC

Abstract: TBC

Slot 2: ***Available***

Tuesday 28rd April, 10-12, Room 10111

Slot 1: ***Available***

Slot 2: ***Available***

Uncategorized

Scottish Learning Disability Observatory – Research Posts

The Scottish Learning Disability Observatory is seeking to recruit a number of new research posts, one at grade 8, and up to 7 other researchers at Grade 6 and 7.  The aim of the recently established observatory is to conduct programmes of research, public engagement and knowledge exchange. The focus is to contribute towards a fairer and healthier Scotland through raising awareness of, and providing evidence-based solutions to the very poor health and health inequalities currently experienced by people with learning disabilities. Areas include: health improvement, service improvement, public health intelligence, research and development, monitoring and assessing trends in the health of people with learning disabilities, assessing evidence of effectiveness, policy and strategy development, collaborative working for health.  We are looking for both quantitative and qualitative researchers and would particularly welcome applications from people with a disability studies background.

Details of the posts are available here:

Grade 6
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AJR451/research-assistant/

Grade 7
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AJR446/research-associate/

Grade 8
http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AJR435/research-fellow/

DRF News

Centre for Comedy Studies Research (CCSR) Research Seminar Series 2014/15 ‘Comedy, Health and Disability’ – Seminar 1

To celebrate their 1st birthday, the Centre for Comedy Studies Research (CCSR) are holding their first Comedy Matters Research Seminar for 2014-15.

Date: Wednesday 8th October 2014

Time: 4.00pm-5.30pm with a drinks reception/birthday party 5.30pm-6.30pm

Location: Mead Room, Hamilton Centre, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB8 3PH

Seminar 1 = Comedy and Mental Health Symposium

This symposium will discuss comedy and its relationship to mental health, with speakers discussing the psychology of the stand-up comedian, the use of stand-up comedy in reducing mental health stigma in the military and uses of comedy with mental health service users.

Speakers: Gordon Claridge is Emeritus Professor of Abnormal Psychology, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Emeritus Fellow, Magdalen College, and Visiting Professor, Oxford Brookes University. Professor Claridge is an internationally renowned expert in the relationship between personality and psychological disorders, adopting a broadly dimensional view. Recently, he has been involved in research on the psychology of the stand-up comedian. More generally, his research on the relationship between personality and psychological disorders has been inspired, on the practical front, by working as a clinical psychologist and, on the academic front, by experimental research on the topic. In mid-career he began to focus particularly on psychotic disorders, developing measurement scales for assessing schizotypal characteristics in the general population and using these to examine laboratory correlates in a wide range of subject samples, including relatives of psychotic patients. The central thesis in all of this work is that, while genetically predisposing to mental illness, psychotic characteristics are not in themselves pathological. On the contrary, they may have many healthy adaptive qualities, of which creativity is the most salient example.

Tim Sayers works as one of the arts in health co-ordinators at Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust (LPT). He has a background in mental health nursing, specialising in working with people with severe and enduring mental health problems and also with people with drug and alcohol problems. Tim has been involved with arts in mental health on a voluntary basis for approximately fifteen years; initially as a founder member of the Brainstorm Arts in Mental Health Group in Birmingham, then as the founder member of BrightSparks: Arts in Mental Health Group in 1999. BrightSparks is dedicated to promoting positive images of mental health through the arts and has an expanding portfolio of arts projects which are mainly delivered in partnership with LPT. Tim is dedicated to using the arts, in particular comedy, to promote positive images of mental health, social inclusion, and service user and carer involvement. Tim is studying for an MSc in Recovery and Social Inclusion at Nottingham University at present, and has had articles published in his field in the past. He has extensive experience of teaching and workshop leading and is also an experienced freelance performer and workshop leader in the fields of music, poetry, comedy, magic and circus skills.

John Ryan is a stand-up comedian and one of seven co-researchers at the Department for Military Mental Health, Kings College, London, on a project that examined ‘modifying attitudes to mental health using comedy as a delivery medium’ in the armed forces. The research aimed to use comedy to help persuade military personnel to seek help with mental health issues. John is also winner of the 2011 Scottish Mental Health and Arts Film Festival Best Short Documentary Award, the 2010 NHS Regional Health and Social Care award winner for Mental Health and Well Being and in 2010 received a Royal Society for Public Health Special Commendation for contributions to the field of Arts and Health Equalities.

We are pleased to announce that we have one £40 travel grant available for a low income researcher or PhD student attending this event. Please email Simon Weaver [simon.weaver@brunel.ac.uk] by Monday 29th September 2014 if you wish to apply.  To apply please send a short paragraph (max 250 words) explaining why you wish to attend the seminar.

For catering purposes please register at comedy.studies@brunel.ac.uk

Everyone very welcome!

For more information, please email Dr Sharon Lockyer (Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Communications + Director, Centre for Comedy Studies Research (CCSR), Brunel University, UK) [Sharon.Lockyer@brunel.ac.uk]

Twitter: @Comedy_Studies

DRF News

Minimising Restrictive Practices in Health and Social Care ‘Safe Restraint’ Project – Consultancy Brief September 2014

[Posted on behalf of Disability Sheffield].

Disability Sheffield is a user led organisation, run and controlled by disabled people. We promote independent living for disabled people in Sheffield. By independent living we mean that disabled people have the same freedom and rights to exercise choice and control over their own lives as any other person

As part of Sheffield Individual Employer & PA Development Group and in partnership with Active Independence, Doncaster, we are running a project funded by Skills for Care under their ‘innovative workforce development fund. This project focuses on raising the issues of minimising the use of restrictive practices in Health and Social Care.

Overview of the project

Recent key documents jointly issued by Skills for Care and Skills for Health on Workforce Development Guidance for Employers seeking to minimise the use of Restrictive Practices in Health and Social Care sets out a clear Framework to be used by all (Skills for Care & Skills for Health 2014).

The focus of the project is to start to develop this conversation with individual employers and their Personal Assistants (PAs) by informing employers of the framework and gaining knowledge of how and when to use it as well as looking at developing good practice resources for PAs. Part of developing the conversation means working with representatives of the statutory services to inform and make changes to their practices. The Common Core Principles of self-directed support are about ensuring those people employing their own staff receive personalised and practical support to promote their health & well-being in ways which respect and promote their independence. Minimisation of restrictive practice plays a key part in this.

This project will develop a range of resources that are accessible in format which target employers in receipt of a Direct Payment and those who self-fund. The information raising action will then lead onto following up with developing a range of co-produced resources and events which will raise the profile of the issue and also inform wider implementation as there will be experts through experience informing future learning and practice. Opportunities already exist through current activity that enable a range of communication routes to be used to enable engagement with some harder to reach groups e.g. younger employers and those going through transition.

Project Outputs and Outcomes

By the end of the project, it is intended that a number of key outputs will have been delivered:

  • A general easy read flyer raising the issue & distributed to Individual Employers;
  • Contact with the widest range of employers who might be interested in progressing the project;
  • 3 separate co-produced questionnaires for statutory staff, individual employers & PAs which will provide information on existing practice, help develop a training needs analysis tool and provide a method for delivery to inform future practice;
  • Piloted sessions for individual employers and PAs on how to have the conversation that ‘Recognises the values and idiosyncrasies of the employer ‘, ‘What restrictive practices means’ and ‘Best support / interventions within a social context reflecting the social model of disability’; and
  • Information on sign posting to other support and advice.

It is intended that the project will involve obtaining feedback from up to 40 statutory staff (Social workers and clinical staff ), 20 Individual employers and 20 Personal Assistants. In addition in Sheffield Mentors / Coaches will have been trained to have the discussion and the topic will have been raised at the monthly employer drop in sessions. In Doncaster the topic will have been raised at the regular PA peer support group meetings.

It is intended that the project will result in an increased awareness and development of good practice within Sheffield and Doncaster with regards to appropriate restrictive practice. Alongside this, individual employers, PAs and practitioner will have access during the project and beyond to resource and training information developed during the project to support and develop their practice within this area.

Impact will be measured by the number of people who have been reached and the extent to which awareness has been raised; numbers attending the training sessions and responses to evaluation forms asking people how useful they found the training and the changes they plan to make to their practice.

Delivering the project

We are looking for a consultant to deliver an evaluation of this project. We are content for this to be a freelance/self-employed individual/team or an individual /team based within an institution.

This is a time-limited project and we are therefore looking for someone/a team who would be able to start work immediately. The work needs to be completed by 15th may 2015. There is up to £5,000 (inclusive of VAT if applicable) available for this piece of work.

Skills and knowledge

This is a short term consultancy and the consultant should have an excellent knowledge about the issues that impact on disabled people. We expect the consultant to:

  • Have knowledge of workforce development and innovation in the adult social care sector;
  • Have expertise in both process and impact evaluation – and of both quantitative and qualitative methods;
  • Have knowledge of research governance procedures in the social care sector;
  • Demonstrate their ability (and provide an undertaking) to complete the project within the specified time.
  • Demonstrate their ability to produce work to the highest standards – in particular the final report and project presentation
  • Have in place appropriate CRB/DBS disclosures and safeguarding policies and relevant professional standards/memberships; and
  • Have excellent communication skills and willingness to communicate with the project steering group throughout the course of this consultancy.

The main key tasks of this brief drawing on the practice and learning in Sheffield and Doncaster are to:

  • Provide an evaluation of the delivery of this project, both in terms of the delivery of project outputs and whether (and the extent to which) the project met its intended objectives;
  • Produce a short accessible report and standalone summary, suitable for Skills for Care publication; and
  • Deliver a presentation of key findings and recommendations for future learning and to inform national practice.

Registering your interest

If you are interested in delivering this project please register your interest by submitting a maximum 4 sides of A4 outlining your suitability for this role including your experience and skills and a brief summary of how you would propose to undertake the work, including timings. Additional information (e.g. Brief CVs, lists of relevant projects, testimonials etc.) can be attached.

Please send your expression of interest by 9am on Wednesday 8th October 2014 to: Emily Morton at Emily.morton@disabilitysheffield.org.uk

If you require this information in an alternative format please contact Emily at the above e-mail address or on Sheffield 0114 2536750

Consultancy Arrangements

  • The successful Consultant is expected to sign a contractual agreement prior to commencing work on the project and have relevant self-employed status and insurance cover.
  • The work shall be carried out in the Consultant’s offices and all expenses incurred in carrying out the work required by the brief shall be the responsibility of the Consultant unless otherwise agreed in writing.
  • The Consultant shall treat as confidential any information obtained in the course of the work.