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Event: Disabled Students at University – Facilities, Support Services and the Impact of Funding Changes (January, 2017; London, UK)

Event: Disabled Students at University – Facilities, Support Services and the Impact of Funding Changes

Date: Thursday, 26th January 2017

Place: Central London

*** this event is CPD certified ***

Timed to follow the reform of the Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA) – which includes a significant reduction in the range of support which can be funded and is due for introduction in September 2016 – this seminar will bring together key policymakers and stakeholders to discuss the immediate impact of the changes as well as steps that can be taken to address further challenges for disabled students’ in Higher Education. Planned sessions will look at the accessibility of campuses, examples of best practice in providing facilities and support services for disabled students – particularly in light of the funding reforms – as well as what more can be done to increase the number of disabled people entering HE in the first instance.

We expect attendees to include university and college leaders and support staff, deans and senior teaching staff; senior representatives from within the NHS and private support providers; assistive technology providers; lawyers; architects, university estates directors, construction companies and others involved in campus design and students’ and lecturers’ unions.

Sarah Howls, Head of Student Opportunity, HEFCE; Professor Geoff Layer, Vice Chancellor, University of Wolverhampton and Chair, The Disabled Students Sector Leadership Group and Paul Williams, Deputy Director, Student Funding Policy, Department for Education have agreed to deliver keynote addresses. Chris Brill, Senior Policy Advisor, Equality Challenge Unit; Dr John Conway, Principal Lecturer & Disability Officer, Royal Agricultural University and Director, National Association of Disability Practitioners; James Elliott, Disabled Students Officer, NUS; John Lamb, Executive Director, British Assistive Technology Association; Mei-Yee Man Oram, Senior Consultant, Accessible Environments and Co-Lead, Accessible Environments Team, ARUP and Liz Sayce, Chief Executive, Disability Rights UK have also agreed to speak at this seminar, as well as a senior speaker confirmed from the Office of the Independent Adjudicator.

Dr Lisa Cameron MP, Chair, All-Party Parliamentary Group for Disability and Lord Holmes of Richmond, Disability Commissioner, Equality and Human Rights Commission have agreed to chair this seminar.

Link for more info: www.westminsterforumprojects.co.uk/forums/event.php?eid=1298&t=17783

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Event: Next Steps for Policy on Children and Young People’s Health (February, 2017; London, UK)

Event: Next Steps for Policy on Children and Young People’s Health

Date: Thursday, 2nd February 2017

Place: Central London

Guest of Honour: Dr Jacqueline Cornish, National Clinical Director, Children, Young People and Transition to Adulthood, NHS England

Policymakers and stakeholders at this seminar will discuss next steps for improving children and young people’s health outcomes in England. Delegates will consider the early impact of new models of care on better coordinating children and young people’s health services, and the potential for Sustainable and Transformation Plans in integrating care for local populations. Further sessions focus on public health initiatives – such as the Government’s childhood obesity strategy and the introduction of the levy on the soft drinks industry from 2018, as well as progress on increasing the provision of high quality mental health care for children and young people, as outlined in NHS England’s Business Plan for 2016/17.

At this early stage, Eustace de Sousa, National Lead, Children, Young People and Families, Public Health England; Tim Atkin, Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Chair of Faculty for Children, Young people and their Families, Division of Clinical Psychology, British Psychological Society; Dr Chad Hockey, GP, Hammersmith and Fulham GP Federation; Matthew Hopkinson, Lead for Mental Health and Bullying, Department for Education; Toby Hyde, Head of Strategy, NHS Hammersmith and Fulham Clinical Commissioning Group; Kate Martin, Director, Common Room Consulting; Professor Neena Modi, President, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and Professor of Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College London; Dr Claire Lemer, Deputy Programme Director, Children and Young People’s Health Partnership and Consultant in General Paediatrics and Service Transformation, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust; Richard Stewart, Chair of the Children’s Surgical Forum, Royal College of Surgeons and Consultant Paediatric Surgeon, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham and Dr Sonia Saxena, Clinical Reader in Primary Care, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London have also agreed to speak. Earl of Listowel, Vice-Chair, All‐Party Parliamentary Group for Looked After Children and Care Leavers and Helen Whately MP, Member, Health Select Committee and Co-Chair, All-Party Parliamentary Health Group have kindly agreed to chair this seminar.

Link for more info: http://www.westminsterforumprojects.co.uk/forums/event.php?eid=1369&t=1869

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Event: Improving mental health provision in Northern Ireland (January 2017; Belfast)

Event: Improving mental health provision in Northern Ireland: prevention, treatment and developments in care

Date: Tuesday, 17th January 2017

Place: Belfast

Timed to follow the Department for Health’s ongoing review of the Bamford Review of Mental Health and Learning Disability – and with the Minister for Health identifying mental health as a key priority for the forthcoming mandate and pledging to be a ‘mental health champion’ – this timely seminar will assess mental health provision in Northern Ireland. Delegates will have an opportunity to consider the recommendations of the Department’s evaluation of the Bamford Review, including how reform would be implemented and what effect it may have on service users and the Health Service. There will also be an opportunity to discuss how to best utilise the resources allocated for the prevention and treatment of mental health problems; bring out new thinking in relation to methods of care and treatment; and consider issues surrounding the growing problem of poor mental health in young people and mental health issues for older people. Those attending will include key policymakers as well as stakeholders from Health and Social Care services for mental health, advocacy and patient groups, mental health charities and community care organisations, local authorities, academics and commentators, and others with an interest in the important issues being discussed.

We are delighted to be able to include in this seminar a keynote address from Andrew Dawson, Head of Mental Health Policy and Capacity Unit, Department of Health, Northern Ireland Executive. Further confirmed speakers include: Oscar Donnelly, Divisional Director, Mental Health, Learning Disability and Community, Northern Health and Social Care Trust; Dr Iris Elliott, Head of Policy and Research, Mental Health Foundation; Dr Raman Kapur, Chief Executive, Threshold; Dr Gerry Lynch, Chair, Royal College of Psychiatrists in Northern Ireland and Vice Chair, Royal College of Psychiatrists; Mairéad McCafferty, Chief Executive, Northern Ireland Commissioner for Children and Young People; Trevor Millar, Director, Adult Mental Health and Disability Services, Western Health and Social Care Trust; Professor Siobhan O’Neill, Professor of Mental Health Sciences, Ulster University and Eileen Shevlin, Expert by experience.

Robbie Butler MLA, Ulster Unionist Party Spokesperson for Mental Health and Member, Committee for Health, Northern Ireland Assembly has kindly agreed to chair the first half of this seminar.

For more info – Link: www.policyforumforni.co.uk/forums/event.php?eid=1362&t=18818

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CFP: ‘Autism Narratives’ Special Issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

Journal: Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

Call for Papers for Special Issue: Autism Narratives

Guest Editors: Stuart Murray (English, University of Leeds) & Mark Osteen (English, Loyola University Maryland)

2018 will mark the 10th anniversary of the publication of two major studies on the cultural representations of autism, Stuart Murray’s monograph Representing Autism: Culture, Narrative, Fascination and Mark Osteen’s edited collection Autism and Representation. In the intervening years, autism representation has proliferated across media and been re-configured diagnostically in the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-V. This special issue asks: what current topics shape the cultural conversations around autism? Has the greater profile of the condition over the last ten years led to improvements in the ways it is discussed and greater sophistication in its representations? Have increases in cross-and multi-disciplinary academic work produced more nuanced accounts of autism experiences? Where does the condition fit in recent developments in Disability Studies? In short, do we now know better what is meant by an ‘autism narrative’?

Possible topics include (but are not limited to):

  • – Autism in fiction, film, and life-narratives
  • – Autism and the visual arts
  • – Music and autism
  • – DSM-V and changes in autism diagnosis; the ‘disappearance’ of Asperger’s syndrome
  • – Autism and popular media
  • – Theorising autism
  • – Medical discourses of autism
  • – Autism and social communities
  • – Autism and technology
  • – Autism and inter/dependence and care
  • – Autism and cultural, ethnic and racial diversity

Please email a one-page proposal to s.f.murray@leeds.ac.uk and mosteen@loyola.edu by February 28, 2017. Contributors can expect to be selected and notified by March 31, 2017. (Full drafts of the selected articles will be due on December 15, 2017). Please direct any questions to either guest editor. We welcome contributions from autistic/neuro-atypical persons.

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Improving student health: mental and physical wellbeing in university (Nov, 2016: London, UK)

Event: Improving student health: mental and physical wellbeing in university

Date: Monday, 7th November 2016

Place: Central London

This event is CPD certified

More info: www.westminsterforumprojects.co.uk/forums/event.php?eid=1350&t=18095

Guest of Honour: Gregor Henderson, National Lead for Wellbeing and Mental Health, Public Health England

This seminar will explore issues around the rising numbers of students suffering from mental health issues in higher education institutions, and wider aspects of student well-being including sexual health, nutrition, substance abuse and active lifestyles. It comes amid concerns in the sector regarding the rising number of students suffering from mental health issues and – in a report commissioned by HEFCE – a mismatch in the services available for them. Areas for discussion include the current state of student health in the UK and the key challenges facing university health services for improving the quality of and access to mental health services for students – as well as steps universities can take to better identify and react to students in need of support.

Delegates will also consider latest thinking on how to address the causes in the rise in student mental health problems. Further sessions look more widely at ways forward for improving students’ all-round health and well-being in the areas of nutrition and diet, sexual health, and encouraging active lifestyles, as well as tackling alcohol and drug abuse.

Gregor Henderson, National Lead for Wellbeing and Mental Health, Public Health England has agreed to be Guest of Honour at the conference, Dr Jeremy Christey, Counsellor and Psychotherapist, Counselling Services, University of Sussex and Chair, Universities & Colleges, British Association for Counselling & Psychotherapy; Dr Nihara Krause, Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Founder and Chief Executive Officer, stem4; Michael O’Toole, Chief Executive, Mentor UK; Rosie Tressler, Chief Executive Officer, Student Minds and Jane Shewring, Strategic Lead for Sport – Deputy Director, Herts Sports Partnership have also agreed to speak.

Kevan Jones MP and Viscount Younger of Leckie, former Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Department for Business, Innovation and Skills have kindly agreed to chair this conference.

 

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Westminster Health Forum – Improving care for people with learning disabilities (May, 2016: London, UK)

Seminar Title: Improving Care for People With Learning Disabilities – Commissioning, Regulation And Reducing Hospital Admissions

Date: Wednesday, 11th May 2016

Place: Sixty One Whitehall, London SW1A 2ET

 **This event is CPD certified**

 Guest of Honour: Dr Dominic Slowie, National Clinical Director for Learning Disabilities, NHS England and Chair, North East and Cumbria Learning Disability Network

This timely seminar will provide an opportunity to assess future policy priorities for people with learning disabilities and/or autism across health and social care. Delegates will consider key issues outlined in NHS England, ADASS and the LGA’s Building the Right Support plan, which aims to reduce the reliance on inpatient care, establish a new service model by 2019 and create joined-up Transforming Care Partnerships for health and social care commissioners locally. Further sessions focus on plans outlined in the Department of Health response to the No Voice Unheard, No Right Ignored consultation, which included proposals for a named social worker and potential amendments to regulations in the Mental Health Act 1983. The agenda also looks at next steps for developing the workforce, and challenges for integrating and personalising care for people with learning disabilities through the use of personal budgets and the Integrated Personal Commissioning programme.

For more information, including our speakers, please click here.

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Westminster Education Forum on ‘Policy Priorities for SEND (Nov, 2016: London, UK)

Title: Policy priorities for SEND – implementing local area inspections, raising educational outcomes and extending support for families

Date: Thursday, 3rd November 2016

Place: Central London, UK

**This Event is CPD Certified**

Description: Bringing together key stakeholders and policymakers from across the education sector, this seminar will consider policy priorities for special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). Planned sessions will also look at measures to improve the educational attainment of children with SEND, including government’s new review into assessment of pupils with lower attainment – expected to be published at the beginning of 2016 – which follows evidence cited by the Department for Education that 50,000 pupils currently fall below the standard required to take national curriculum tests, including many with SEND. Delegates will also assess the implementation and progress to date of the SEND Code of Practice – two years on from its introduction – including the impact of the Local Offer, Education, Health and Care (EHC) Plans and personal budgets, which aim to give children and families more choice and control over the kinds of support they receive.

At this early stage, we are delighted that Dr Adam Boddison, Chief Executive, nasen has agreed to be a Guest of Honour at this seminar. Nigel Thompson, Head of Children and Health & Justice, CQC; Janet Thompson, Deputy Chair, Rochford Review and Headteacher, Dorothy Goodman School, Leicestershire and a senior speaker confirmed from SENJIT (Special Educational Needs Joint Initiative for Training), Institute of Education, University College London has also agreed to deliver a keynote speech. Matthew Ellis, Associate Director, South West Maternity and Children’s Strategic Clinical Network, NHS England; Simon Knight, Deputy Headteacher, Frank Wise School, Oxfordshire; Laxmi Patel, Solicitor and Head of Education, Boyes Turner and Julie Stockdale, Head of Schools & Commissioning, Surrey County Council have also agreed to speak.

For more details: click here.

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Now Booking: Disability Studies Student Society Symposium (Liverpool Hope University, UK: June, 2016)

The Disability Studies student society symposium at Liverpool Hope University hopes to bring together students across the North-West to share, discuss and advise on research methodologies in disability studies. The symposium is open to students, both undergraduate and postgraduate, to explore a range of innovative and creative methodologies within the growing field of disability studies.

This is a free event, however for catering purposes please confirm your attendance via the registration form which can be found here.

We invite submissions of abstracts of up to 300 words for paper presentations that detail methodological approaches to research projects, both those that have been completed and those that are currently underway.

The student symposium will be held at Liverpool Hope University on Wednesday 22nd June 2016. A full schedule for the symposium will be updated and available shortly as will be details for registration.

Abstracts of up to 300 words should be submitted for consideration by 29th April 2016 to12000935@hope.ac.uk Presenters will be informed via email by 22nd May 2016.

For more information please follow this link https://studentsymposiumliverpoolhope.wordpress.com/

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PhD studentship: Children with Learning Disabilities as Digital Audiences (Univ. of Glasgow, UK)

AHRC funded PhD studentship at the University of Glasgow in collaboration with BBC Scotland: “Children with Learning Disabilities as Digital Audiences”

Applications are invited for a full PhD studentship in Film and Television Studies at the University of Glasgow to work in collaboration with the Children’s Department at BBC Scotland. The aim of the project is to explore the provision and design of digital media by the BBC for older children with learning disabilities. This exciting opportunity will require the researcher to divide his or her time between the University of Glasgow and the Children’s Department within BBC Scotland (situated in the Pacific Quay in Glasgow). The student will have unique access to the Children’s Department, working amongst BBC staff to capture a sense of the existing provision of digital content for children with learning disabilities and the ways in which BBC Scotland engage with this audience. The project will then continue through a small scale qualitative study that will capture how, why and when digital media is used, interpreted and enjoyed by members of this specific audience. The student will then return to the BBC with their research findings and work alongside colleagues to develop a ‘pitch’ for the design or redesign of digital content that will allow the BBC to respond directly to the needs and desires of their targeted audience.

The specific question this project poses is how we might re-imagine content for differently-abled audiences that is appropriate to both their cognitive abilities and their personal/social needs and desires. (Aims and Objectives are posted below)

A supervisory team from across both institutions will oversee this work and full research training (including audience research skills if required) will be offered. The team will include Dr. Amy Holdsworth and Professor Karen Lury from the University of Glasgow and Ms. Sara Harkins (Head of Children’s BBC Scotland) with relevant support from professional colleagues within BBC Scotland.

he studentship is funded for three years to commence in October 2016 and covers tuition fees at the Home/EU rate. Home students and EU students who have lived in the UK for 3 years prior to the award will also receive a maintenance bursary (stipend) of approx. £14,296 for 16-17 plus an additional £550 travel allowance. In addition, the student is eligible to receive up to £1,000 a year from the BBC to support travel or other expenses directly related to the doctoral research, and will be given use of a desk and computer at the University of Glasgow and appropriate access and resources at the BBC. All AHRC Collaborative PhD students automatically become part of the UK-wide Collaborative Doctoral Partnership development scheme which will provide training in a range of skills needed for research within museums, archives, galleries and heritage organisations.

Informal enquiries are welcome.

Please write to Dr. Amy Holdsworth (Amy.Holdsworth@glasgow.ac.uk ) in the first instance.

Candidates ideally should have:

  • A good 2.1 Honours (or B.A.) degree in a relevant Arts or Social Science discipline.
  • A Masters degree in a related discipline or appropriate professional experience within children’s media, digital media, audience development, working with children and young people with disabilities.
  • A good understanding of contemporary Children’s Television, digital media and issues and debates within disability studies
  • An interest in, or first-hand knowledge of, audience research. • Applicants should be able to demonstrate strong research capabilities and be fluent in spoken and written English.

Applications should include: • A statement of no more than 1,000 words indicating what skills and experience you have that will be relevant for the project. • A current CV • Degree transcripts (this may be an interim transcript if you are still studying) • An example of writing – e.g. academic essay, professional report – up to 3000 words in length • 2 academic/professional references (these may be sent directly from your referees if they would prefer)

Applications to be sent to Jeanette.Berrie@glasgow.ac.uk (Research Administrator, School of Culture and Creative Arts, University of Glasgow) with the subject line BBC CDA.

Closing Date: Wednesday 15th June 2016

Interviewees will be notified by Thursday 23rd June and interviews will take place at the University of Glasgow on Friday 1st July 2016.

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The Project: Through initial audience development work, colleagues at BBC Scotland have already observed the ways in which digital content designed for a young (‘pre-school’) audience is being used by older children with learning disabilities. They have recognized that while these young people may have less sophisticated ‘operational’ abilities their desire and interest in age appropriate content is not necessarily affected. In simple terms, games or interactive challenges aimed at 4-7year olds may represent an appropriate operational challenge (how to work the game, how to move about and between different parts of the page) but are inappropriate in terms of content (older children and young people are more likely to respond positively to content such as WolfBlood rather than In the Night Garden or ‘Mr. Tumble’). The project will therefore focus on this particular issue and ask how we might re-imagine content for differently-abled audiences that is appropriate to their cognitive abilities and their personal/social needs and desires.

 Aims and objectives.

The aims and objectives of this collaborative project are designed to both reflect upon and develop the BBC’s relationship with its differently abled child audience.

Aims

  1. To explore the provision of content for children with learning disabilities: Initial stages of the research will explore the existing provision of digital content for children with learning disabilities and the ways in the children’s department at BBC Scotland engage with this audience (through audience development initiatives, for example). This initial ‘snapshot’ accompanied by critical investigation of academic literature on children, disability and media will form a building block for the student to design and implement a qualitative audience study.
  2. To conduct a small-scale qualitative audience study of children with learning disabilities as digital audiences/users: Utilizing the appropriate methodologies (see below) the student will capture how, why and when digital media is used, interpreted and enjoyed by children with learning disabilities. This fieldwork will importantly also offer the child the opportunity to reflect upon and discuss their use of digital media (e.g. their preferences, desires, likes and dislikes).

Objectives

  1. The student will disseminate research findings through traditional academic outputs and through partnership with the BBC: One of the principle objectives of the project is for the research to have an avenue of dissemination within the BBC to allow the institution to reflect upon and develop their own practices and forms of audience engagement. The links with BBC Scotland and its contacts present opportunities for the research to be accessed by other stakeholder communities and organisations (such as ‘for Scotland’s Disabled Children’ (fSDC)).
  2. To implement research findings through the production of a BBC ‘pitch’: Through the student’s involvement at BBC Scotland he or she will utilise their research on this specific child audience in the development, design or redesign of games, applications or website provision for this audience.
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CFP: ‘Discourses of Care: Care in Media, Medicine and Society’ (Sept. 2016; Glasgow, UK)

Event: Discourses of Care: Care in Media, Medicine and Society Conference

Location: Gilmorehill Halls, 9 University Avenue, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ

Date: Monday 5th – Wednesday 7th September 2016

Deadline for proposals: Friday 3rd June 2016

Keynote speakers:

Summary: This Wellcome-funded interdisciplinary conference aims to support and foster collaborative work in relation to media and questions of care and well-being, focusing on care and care giving as critical concepts. Bringing together scholars from film and television studies, medical humanities, disability studies, and philosophy, we will debate how understandings of medical and social care are (and might be) positioned in relation to media and cultural studies. This would be a significant first step toward building inter-disciplinary alliances and driving forward work within the as yet under-determined field of ‘visual medical humanities’. The specific focus of the conference and anticipated publication/s is to explore the ways in which media do more than simply represent care and caring (although representation, of course, remains an important issue). Taking a new approach, the conference will explore how media forms and media practices (the creation, exhibition and reception of media) may act as a mode of care. Thus we wish to explore how different kinds of media programming, media technologies and media practices present opportunities in which care is manifest as both an ‘attitude’ and a ‘disposition’ (Feder Kittay).The event will underpin at least one multi-authored publication. Through this conference we will explore the politics and ethics of care-relationships and contest binary understandings of autonomy and dependency amongst individuals with cognitive and physical disabilities, carers and medical professionals. We are particularly interested in the nexus of youth (the ‘child’), age (the ‘aged’) and disability as a way of opening up alliances and challenges to popular cultural notions and representations of care and dependency. We are now looking for academics, care providers, and creative practitioners of all levels, periods, and fields to submit proposals for 20 minute conference papers.

We invite papers on topics that include (but are not limited to):

  • Relationships between care and media
  • Definitions of care in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries
  • Autobiographical representations of and reactions to care
  • Disability studies approaches to care and dependency
  • Media practices and outputs as modes of care
  • Care and the visual medical humanities
  • Adaptive technologies and care
  • Spectatorship, care, and media
  • Care, media, and children
  • Care, media, and ageing
  • Use of media in health education and rehabilitation
  • Consumer ‘choice’ and ‘autonomy’ in popular culture
  • Screen cultures in our ‘institutions of care’ (e.g. the NHS and the BBC).

Please email an abstract of up to 300 words and a short bio (100-200 words) to the conference organisers (discoursesofcare@gmail.com) by Friday 3rd June 2016. The conference team will respond to proposals by Friday 10th June 2016.

There are a limited number of travel bursaries available for postgraduate and/or early career presenters; the recipients of these grants will be asked to write a short reflection on the conference, which will be published on the Glasgow Medical Humanities Research Centre blog, and the conference website.

If you wish to be considered for one of the travel bursaries, please email us for an application form and submit it with your abstract and bio. We will contact all respondents on the outcome of their proposal by the end of June 2016. Thanks to funding from the Wellcome Trust, this conference will be free to attend.

The conference venue, the Gilmorehill Building, is fully accessible, and the conference will include accommodations such as pre-circulated papers and discussion topics, ending with an interactive roundtable discussion. For more information on access, transport, and the venue please visit our website. If you have any questions, please email the conference team at discoursesofcare@gmail.com, or contact us via @CareDiscourses.

Conference team: Prof. Karen Lury (Film and TV), Dr Amy Holdsworth (Film and TV), and Dr Hannah Tweed (English Literature).