Children, Familes and Young People, disability, disability research, Familes and Young People

PhD Funding: Towards adulthood: exploring transitions to adulthood for young people with learning disabilities in a devolving Greater Manchester

From: http://www2.mmu.ac.uk/research/research-study/scholarships/2016/towards-adulthood-exploring-transitions-to-adulthood-for-young-people-with-learning-disabilities-in-a-devolving-greater-manchester.php

Project summary

The interdisciplinary project will explore ‘transitions’ of young people with learning disabilities to adulthood in Greater Manchester.  The participatory study will build on previous research (Big Society? Disabled people with learning disabilities and civil society, ESRC funded) and will enhance pathways to impact for the impact narrative allied to this research.

Project aims and objectives

The Children and Family Act (2014), which followed the publication of Support and Aspiration: a new approach to special educational needs and disability (DfE, 2011), was intended to improve transitions for young people with learning disabilities into adulthood.  The introduction of Education, Health and Care Plans, that document children and young people’s support needs from birth to 25, were specifically designed to end the so-called ‘cliff edge’ that had been identified for young people with learning disabilities who found themselves transitioning to adulthood often without adequate services and support.

The transition to Education, Health and Care plans in Greater Manchester is still on going and the impact of the changes as a result of the Children and Families Act are unknown.  However, research suggests (Hatton, 2015) that many young people who have been identified with Special Educational Needs are still lost in transition to adult services.  Thresholds for accessing adult social care, following the Care Act, 2014, are rising and the Devolution Manchester agenda will also result in a huge shake up in the way that education, health and social care are delivered.  This timely research will explore the following objectives:

  1. To explore the social construction of ‘learning disability’ and ‘adulthood’ in the lives of young people in transition;
  2. To explore the policy and cultural contexts of transitions for young people with learning disabilities in the context of devolution Greater Manchester;
  3. To understand the nature of the support that young people with learning disabilities receive in transition;
  4. To explore examples of ‘good practice’ in transition in Greater Manchester;
  5. To develop an evidence base to inform policy and practice in Greater Manchester, regionally and nationally, in relation to transition for young people with learning disabilities.

The objectives will be met through the following research phases

  1. Review of literature on ‘learning disability’, ‘adulthood’,  ‘transition’ and ‘devolution’ Greater Manchester (Aim 1 & 2)
  2. To work in coproduction with young people with learning disabilities, their families and allies to understand their experiences of transition. (We envisage that research will draw on range of multi-media methods to work collaboratively with a diverse range of young people) (Aims 3 & 4)
  3. Analysis (Aim 5)
  4. Dissemination & impact generation activities, including policy focused summary cards and briefing papers. (Aim 5)

The proposed project builds on existing research within The Research Centre for Social Change: Community Wellbeing and offers pathways to impact from the Research Centre.

This application has the support of Manchester People’s First, an advocacy organization led by people with learning disabilities in Manchester and Breakthrough UK, a disabled people led organization in Manchester.

The research team will work with the student to co-author high quality journal articles (REF 2020).

The research team is led by Katherine Runswick-Cole, an experienced disability researcher, supported by Sue Caton, an established researcher and PhD supervisor with a PhD in transitions for young people with learning disabilities (completed 2003), and Leanne Rimmer, a new member of the Psychology staff at MMU who has an interest in housing and wellbeing.   The supervisory team exceeds the requirements for completions at MMU.

Specific requirements of the project

Qualifications

  • Good honours degree (or equivalent) in social care, psychology, sociology, disability studies, education or related discipline
  • Masters level qualification or equivalent professional experience

Skills

  • Proven record of strong organisational skills
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills
  • Good team working skills
  • Good interpersonal skills and strong negotiating skills
  • Good IT skills
  • Evidence of ability to work collaboratively and to work on own initiative
  • High level of motivation

Knowledge & Experience

  • Genuine desire to pursue PhD study and to develop their skills as a researcher
  • Knowledge and understanding of the challenges facing young people with learning disabilities in transition to adulthood
  • Knowledge and understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods
  • Experience of paid and/or voluntary work alongside people with learning disabilities
  • Developing knowledge and understanding of disability studies
  • Developing knowledge and understanding of the Devolution Greater Manchester context
  • Developing knowledge and understanding of participatory and multi-media research methods
  • Developing knowledge of public engagement activities and pathways to impact

Student eligibility

UK, EU and international students

Supervisory Team

Informal enquiries can be made to:

Dr Katherine Runswick-Cole, Director of Studies
Tel: +44 (0)161 247 2906
Email: k.runswick-cole@mmu.ac.uk

Dr Sue Caton
Email: s.caton@mmu.ac.uk

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aging, CFP, disability, disability research, Disability Studies and...

CFP: Review of Disability Studies – Special Forum on Disability and Aging

Call for Papers: Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal Special Forum on Disability and Aging

  • “Empirically, we need to remember these facts: barring sudden death, those who are aging and those who have a disability can be only artificially separated at a particular moment in time. Or except for the possibility of sudden death, everyone with a disability will age, and everyone who is aging will acquire one or more disabilities.” (Zola, 1989, p. 6)
  • “Rather than merely read old age as disability, or disability as akin to old age, it is crucial to consider how an older person’s body read as having a disability is different from a younger person’s body read as having a disability. Similarly, it is crucial to consider how an older person’s body read as having a disability is different from an older person’s body read as not having a disability.” (Chivers, 2011, p. 22)
  • Population aging is taking place in nearly all countries across the globe and, by midcentury, older persons (ages 60 year and over) are projected to exceed the number of children for the first time ever (UN, 2013). According to the World Health Organization (WHO) (2010), chronic non-communicable diseases associated with old age will soon represent the greatest burden on global health. Within reports published by global governing bodies, disability is routinely assumed and directly referenced as a consequence of population aging. Although powerful in their potential to direct support to targeted issues, such reports may also contribute to a “crisis rhetoric” (Kennedy, 2002, p. 226) that rests on an “inappropriate conflation” (Chivers, 2011, p. 22) between disability and aging, which begins with the assumption that all older people are disabled by virtue of their being old. Such conflation has implications for public policy and entitlement to services and supports.

Research, policy and practice have tended to treat disability as a product of unsuccessful aging, and aging as an obstacle to living well with a disability. There is a paucity of research that explores the nuances and complexities of the relationship between disability and aging (Freedman, 2014). Conceptually, aging and disability are not only separated temporally, but spatially as well. There is, for example, very limited research on the experiences of young people living within nursing home environments and other residential care facilities despite the co-residence of older and young adults.

  • The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal (RDS) seeks proposals for a special forum on disability and aging. We are currently soliciting papers of approximately 6000 words in length. The deadline for submission of papers is October 31st, 2015. Papers should be submitted to the RDS online submission system at www.rds.hawaii.edu. Upon submission, please submit under the “forums” category from the pull-down menu and indicate in the “notes for the editor” that your paper is for consideration for the special forum on disability and aging.

Papers considered for inclusion may take the form of academic and creative works, as well as reflections on international disability-specific policies, practices, pedagogies and developments.

Topics to be explored may include:

  • (Trans-/)Disciplinary approaches to disability and aging
  • Disability and aging as made to appear in/by technology, design and the built environment (e.g., Universal Design)
  • Decolonizing disability and aging (post-/anti-colonial approaches)
  • Disability, aging and embodiment
  • Disability, aging, and the labor market
  • Disability and/as (un)successful aging
  • Epistemological relations to disability and aging
  • Genealogies of disability and aging
  • Geographies of disability and aging (social and cultural/local, national, inter-/transnational)
  • Global policies and best practices that connect disability and aging
  • Intersectional analyses that foreground disability and age
  • (Dis)ablism and Ageism
  • Living well: Social philosophical approaches to the good life from the dual perspectives of disability and aging
  • Points of connection and contestation between disability studies and aging studies (e.g., caregiving studies)
  • Queering disability and aging
  • Theoretical and ethnographic approaches to the study of disability and aging
  • The chronologization of the life course

Submissions to this special forum will undergo a process of multiple editor peer-review. Authors will be notified of whether their papers will be included in the forum by December 1st, 2015. Prospective authors are encouraged to consult the RDS website at www.rds.hawaii.edu for more information about the Journal and its formatting guidelines. Authors are encouraged to review previous issues of RDS in preparing their paper and to subscribe to the Journal. All submissions must follow the RDS publication guidelines posted on the website.

  • RDS is a peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary, international journal published by the Center on Disability Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa. The Journal contains research articles, essays, creative works and multimedia relating to the culture of disability and people with disabilities.

We look forward to receiving your submissions. If you have any questions please contact the Special Guest Editors Dr. Katie Aubrecht [katieaubrecht@msvu.ca] and Dr. Tamara Krawchenko [tkrawche@gmail.com]

  • Works Cited

Chivers, S. (2011). The Silvering Screen: Old Age and Disability in Cinema. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Freedman, V. (2014). Research gaps in the demography of aging with a disability. Disability and Health Journal, 7, S60-S63.

Kennedy, J. (2002). Disability and aging – beyond the crisis rhetoric. Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 12(4), 226-228.

United Nations. (UN). (2013). World population ageing. Department of Economic and Social Affairs Population Division. New York: United Nations. Retrieved from http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/ageing/WorldPopulationAgeing2013.pdf

World Health Organization (WHO). (2010). Global health and aging. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/ageing/publications/global_health.pdf

Zola, I. (1989). Aging and disability: Toward a unified agenda. Journal of Rehabilitation, 6-8.

Disability Studies and...

PhD Fees Bursary: Centre for Culture and Disability Studies

The Centre for Culture and Disability Studies (CCDS), Faculty of Education, Liverpool Hope University, offers one [fees only] bursary for a full-time PhD student. This is part of the overall research strategy of the centre, which aims to encourage and support the most important work in the field.

Like much work in the field of Disability Studies, the work of the CCDS is fundamentally concerned with social justice, with challenging and changing the inequalities and prejudices that people who are disabled face on a daily basis.  Though there are other centres for disability studies in the United Kingdom, the CCDS is unique in its focus on culture as the means by which prejudices around disability are circulated and perpetuated. This focus is explored in our journal, monographs, edited books, articles, seminar series, book series, presentations, networks, website, conferences, courses, and so on.

The successful applicant will be welcomed into this internationally recognised, vibrant community and expected to make a significant contribution to it.  Her or his research will be interdisciplinary, investigating aspects of historical, cultural, and/or educational representations of disability.

The successful applicant may have the opportunity to teach on our undergraduate Special Educational Needs course and, if so, teaching will be paid at the appropriate rates.  In addition the bursary holder will be required to offer administrative support to the CCDS.  The Dean has budgeted for up to 50 hours paid via Hope Works at the basic rate for administrative support.

The bursary will cover full-time Home/EU PhD fees for three years starting 1st October 2014 [£3,980 per academic year]. Payment of the bursary will be made directly to the Liverpool Hope University Finance Department annually. International applicants are welcome, and must be eligible to study in the UK.

The successful applicant will meet the University standard academic entry criteria for admission to a PhD, and will undertake the typical applicant process [including expression of interest, full application, and face to face interview]. It is expected that the successful applicant will complete and submit their PhD thesis within three years of initial registration. Continuation on the PhD is depended upon ongoing successful academic progression throughout the course.

The Centre for Culture and Disability Studies PhD Fees Bursary is only available for PhD applicants to study within this area of expertise at Liverpool Hope University.

For more information about the CCDS:  http://ccds.hope.ac.uk/index.htm

Guidance for applicants to the CCDS PhD Fees Bursary

Expression of Interest  Friday 18th July 2014
Full Application Submitted      Monday 1st September 2014
Interviews      Monday 8th September 2014, Tuesday 9th September 2014
Outcomes        Week commencing 22nd September 2014

How to apply
Information about Postgraduate Research at Liverpool Hope, the programmes offered and our entry criteria can be found on our web pages for prospective applicants:

http://www.hope.ac.uk/research/postgraduateresearch/

All applicants should use the Online Application System [please refer to the ‘Apply Now’ tab]. The standard deadline for Postgraduate Research applications for an October 2014 start has passed; however, applications for the CCDS PhD Fees Bursary follow the time frame stated above. When completing the application form you will need to enter your start date as January 2014/15, but you will be considered only for October 2014.

Expression of Interest
Applicants have up to 500 words to describe their area of interest to research for the PhD. Please provide as much information and detail at this stage to enable the reviewers to assess the potential project. From this a decision will be made whether or not to invite you to submit a full application.

Full Application
Applicants invited to submit a full application must complete all sections of the application form as appropriate. Candidates are invited to choose their own research project, although it is expected that it will fall within the area of Culture and Disability Studies. As with all doctoral programmes applicants will only be considered in areas where active research is present and a supervisory team can be provided.  Please make use of the ‘Advice on Writing a Research Proposal’ available on our applicant pages to guide you.

Interviews
Interviews for candidates will take place at the main Hope Park Campus. For students at distance arrangements can be made for a Skype interview. If you are invited to submit a full application please hold the interview dates in your diary. Candidates selected for interview will be contacted no later than Friday 5th September to confirm the date and time.

Questions
Should you have any questions about the applicant process, please contact: Mr Chris Lowry, Research Support Officer: researchdegrees@hope.ac.uk

Disability Studies and..., Events and Conferences

Event Report: Gender and Dis/ability Day – thinking about ‘access’ #gendisability

I’ve finally got around to writing up a report from our Gender and Dis/ability day. Here it is:

In the final chapter of her brilliant book, Feminist Queer Crip, Alison Kafer poses three points of coalition to help us move towards ‘accessible futures’: 1) talking about access and toilets; 2) linking disability and environmental justice movements; and 3) having feminist-disability conversations around reproductive justice. All were topics discussed by around 50 people in Sheffield on May 10th 2014 at Gender and Dis/ability: Asking Difficult Questions; a one day event co-hosted by the DRF based at Sheffield Hallam University, people from the University of Sheffield (including members of the Postgraduate Gender Research Network [PGRN], Sociology and History departments) and Lancaster University.

The idea for this event began when I (Jenny Slater) presented at the Troubling Gender conference hosted a year earlier by Charlotte Jones and Jennifer Kettle, convenors of the PGRN. The Troubling Gender conference was great, stimulated much discussion, and a credit to those who presented and organised. However, despite an intersectional focus, mine was one of the only papers to ‘trouble gender’ alongside dis/ability. Noting this, conversations began with one of the organisers, Charlotte Jones, as to how we could explicitly address an often missing analysis of dis/ability in a future gender-based event; and the Gender and Dis/ability event was born.

Gathering a number of interested people together, conversations began. As an organising team we were committed to thinking holistically about ‘access’; we wanted this to be apparent discursively, theoretically and experientially throughout the day. We thought about ‘access’ along the lines of gender and disability, but also in terms of cost (we wanted a free event), and who would feel expected and welcome (we made a call which we hoped would attract people outside of academia).

We managed the above to varying degrees; without a budget, some things were tricky. Everyone involved in organising the event were employed and/or students in a university so we could book a space free of charge within a university building. Yet, a university building wasn’t our first choice of venue because, whilst university buildings may make some feel welcome, they’re not places everyone feels they belong. Those who haven’t been to university, for example, may not feel they are (to use Tanya Titchkosky’s words) ‘expected participants’ at such an event. Furthermore, one only has to look at the architecture of most university buildings to find that disabled people are not the ‘expected participants’. Although finances meant we had to settle on a university building, finding a building we felt was suitably accessible within the university was difficult.

We settled (eventually) on the Humanities Research Institute at the University of Sheffield. This offered us three rooms, in addition to toilets, a foyer and a small kitchen on a ground floor, with some parking outside. The building was in no way perfect – for reasons none of us could fathom, a cobbled floor inside separated the main conference rooms from the toilets (including the accessible toilet). The foyer was small with little room for seating and there wasn’t a space for us all to ‘be together’ during the day. Working within university regulations, we couldn’t offer an informal crèche to allow access for those with children, as is sometimes done in other radical/DIY spaces.

We deliberated over how to overcome some of our access dilemmas. We relabelled toilet doors so, rather than the gender binaries presumed and concreted through ‘male’, ‘female’ and ‘disabled’/‘accessible’ toilets, we had ‘toilets with urinals’, ‘toilets without urinals’ and ‘accessible/private’ toilets (something I’ll come back to). We discussed whether it was better to have less general conference space in order to provide a quiet room for those that may need it for a variety of reasons including taking time out or administering medication (and decided yes, it was). We wrote notes to people chairing sessions asking them not to presume pronouns of participants. As people signed up to join the event, we asked what we could do to make the space more accessible to them (and after the event, we asked again – so we can continue to struggle towards ‘access’ in the future).

So, access wasn’t ideal – there were things we would have liked to have done differently. Yet, we wondered through the conference what it would mean to have a ‘fully accessible’ space. We asked this question of our participants overtly through our wall of post-it-notes for people to add their thoughts. One delegate asked ‘can access needs clash?’ to which someone responded, ‘yes – I trip on the textured pavement which is put down for visually impaired people’. We also borrowed a toilet door from Sheffield University’s students union on which participants scribbled their toilet-related thoughts. As well as some ‘bog’ standard puns (‘URINE TROUBLE’; ‘this event is THE SHIT’; ‘FLUSH AWAY YOUR PRECONCEPTIONS’), delegates’ scribblings made us think about what it means to have access to toilets. This included having changing places (most ‘accessible toilets’ aren’t accessible enough); having more space to manoeuvre in toilets, more toilets in non-commercial spaces (‘FREE TO PEE!’); and relabeling doors with what’s inside rather than who’s allowed or expected to enter to try create spaces away from the (cis) gaze.

Toilet Door Graffitti

Moreover, conversations of access, inclusion and belonging continued through workshops and presentations (we tried to have one workshop and one presentation session running throughout). The first few sessions, for example, included Hannah Paterson running a workshop asking how activism and protest could be made accessible; Naomi Jacobs thought about in/exclusions of stories of women and disability in the bible; and Peter Fuzesi and Melania Moscoso addressed questions of bodies, autonomy and power.

Frances Ryan, journalist for The Guardian and The New Statesman, was one attendee at the event. In an article written after attending she noted that “some of the differences that disability provokes can complicate feminism’s understanding of female bodies and the oppression of them”. Cat Smith and Mathy Selvakumaran‘s presentations on fashion, desirability and norms highlighted some of the often uncomfortable relationships between ‘disability’ and ‘femininity’. We wanted to make recordings of the event available to those who could not attend, however, our technical failings meant only one of these recordings worked – you can, however, listen to Cat and Mathy’s discussions on our new DRF SoundCloud page. I’d also recommend Cat’s article, Normcore is Bullsh*t, and Mia Mingus’ blog to think some more about the issues raised in these talks.

Similarly important discussions carried on after lunch with presentations on queer disabled identities. Alexa Athelstan introduced the work of Peggy Munson in an important talk which included bringing our attention to fragrance free as an access requirement (something I myself need to learn more about). Following this Suchitra Chatterjee discussed hate crime in a presentation called ‘Race, Gender and Disability – or the Physically Disabled Bisexual Transgender Woman of Colour in the Room’. For Frances Ryan, the feminist-disability dilemmas are perhaps “never […] more riddled than with abortion”.  Hazel Kent facilitated a workshop on reproductive justice to ask some difficult questions regarding the exclusion of disabled women from abortion debates and the conflicts between pro-choice arguments and reproductive rights which are fully supportive of parents with disabled children.

For the penultimate session I attended Jude Woods’ workshop on doing intersectional, participatory community work. We talked about the tensions of working intersectionally with groups of people whose priorities may differ. The struggles and complexities of coalition through social movements was a theme running throughout the day, and immediately on leaving this workshop a friend told me I had missed “a GREAT panel” next door – where Míriam Arenas-Conejo and Anna Wates were discussing dis/ability and/in social movements. Two pertinent tweets (#gendisability) after this session read: “Walking as action and agency linked to political protest but little thought given to pace or visibility” and “The Street romanticised as place of political action, but gendered as male space, exclusionary for disabled people”.

One of the parallel sessions in the final slot of the day was cancelled so we ended on a workshop which everyone was invited to attend – and again, the conversation came back to toilets. Charlotte Jones, Hari Byles and myself facilitated a workshop called, On the Toilet: the Politics of Public and Private Space. In the book aptly named, Toilet, it’s pointed out that toilets are spaces often considered mundane, amusing or unimportant; they’re often left forgotten or ignored… until, that is, they are inadequate or unavailable. Charlotte and I met Hari through a shared conviction that toilets as more usually inadequate for some than for others. As our toilet door graffiti showed us, toilets are places which bring up issues of in/exclusion, public/private, identities and norms. During the workshop we discussed people’s feelings on our toilet door relabeling. Some thought it was a good idea to label toilets by writing/showing what’s inside them. Some felt relieved to not have to worry about the problematic gender binaries toilets presented them with. Others pointed out, however, that they were still searching for the ‘right toilet’ (i.e. the one that they thought coordinated with their gender identity). Whilst some with physical impairments felt oppressed by the relabeling of the accessible toilet, as they worried that they’d be waiting even longer than usual for the only space accessible to them.

I could write about toilets for ages. Instead though, I’ll direct you to People In Search of Safe and Accessible Restrooms, or PISSAR, who are worth looking at for more on access and toilets. The point I want to end on, though, is that the conference finished with some of the dilemmas we as an organising team started with: conversations around what it means to ‘have access’. Issues of ‘access’ are never straight forward; yet, like Kafer suggests, moving towards accessible futures is about struggling together through coalition – moving forward with some of the difficult conversations we had on that Saturday in May. We believe these conversations are always worth having and we hope that that dialogue/action though the Gender and Dis/ability event will continue. You can join the conversation through twitter via @shudisability @gendisability #gendisability (you can also see some of the tweets made through the day here). Alternatively, I (j.slater@shu.ac.uk) or the Gender and Disability team (gender.disability@shef.ac.uk) can be contacted through email. We hope the event will happen again somewhere and in some form– so watch this space (and, if you’re interesting in getting involved in helping to organise, get in touch!).

Thanks to Charlotte Jones for her feedback on this blog post and all that contributed to what was a brilliant day.

 

Children, Familes and Young People, Critical Theory, DRF News, Events and Conferences, Media and Culture

Reminder: Next DRF Seminar – Thurs. 13th Mar (2pm-4pm)

When: Thursday, 13th March 2014: 2pm-4pm – Arundel 10111 (SHU)

Where: Arundel Room 10111 (SHU) [the Arundel Building = 122 Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB.  For a map of City Campus click here.]

Everyone welcome!

Slot 1: Cassie Ogden (Univ. of Chester, UK): Troubling Borders with Bodies that Seep: an critical sociological exploration into children’s experiences of leaky realities and how we can learn to accept our bodies in all its leaky glory.

Slot 2: Jenny Slater (SHU): School Toilet Chat: Exploring how Issues of Space, Access, Embodiment, Identity and ‘Normal’ Function in the the Lives of Young People

For George (2011), toilets are “the big necessity”; a mundane part of life that, until absent or inadequate, we rarely pay attention. One place these facilities are consistently found to be inadequate are in schools (Burton, 2013, Greed, 2010). Vernon, Lundblad and Hellstrom (2003) reported that 62% of boys and 35% of in the UK avoided using toilets whilst at school (citing reasons of lack of hygiene, privacy and bullying); and in 2013, a study in Scotland similarly highlighted the poor state of school toilet (Burton, 2013). Here I seek feedback on a proposal which hopes to utilise theorisations of disability, queer and fat activists and academics, to think hard about school toilets as transdisciplinary spaces to explore how issues of space, access, embodiment and normal function in the lives of young people.

 

Children, Familes and Young People, Critical Theory, Disability Studies and..., Events and Conferences, Inclusion, Majority/Minority Worlds, Policy and Legislation

Book Launch: Disabled Children’s Childhood Studies: Critical Approaches in a Global Context

The Birkbeck Centre for Medical Humanities invites you to a book launch with wine reception for Disabled Children’s Childhood Studies: Critical Approaches in a Global Context edited by Tillie Curran and Katherine Runswick-Cole.

6pm-8pm, Friday 31st January

Peltz Gallery, School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, Birkbeck, University of London, WC1H 0PD

Free and open to all, but registration required. Please email Harriet Cooper to register (h.cooper@bbk.ac.uk). Book Launch on Fri 31 Jan_’Disabled Children’s Childhood Studies’

 

Disability Studies and..., Events and Conferences

Call for Ideas: Gender and Disability: Asking Difficult Questions (10th May 2014, Sheffield, UK)

Announcing Gender and Disability: Asking Difficult Questions

Saturday 10th May 2014, Interdisciplinary Centre of the Social Sciences (ICOSS), University of Sheffield

We’re calling for activists, artists, academics and practitioners to get involved in a day of discussions on the theme of gender and dis/ability. We welcome ideas for the sharing of skills and stories, art, performances, poetry, workshops, round-table discussions, papers and presentations.

The event aims to create a space for conversations and debate between communities who share an interest in gender and disability.

Some ideas for topics/themes:

(Dis)ableism, discrimination, exclusion and (in)accessibility
‘Abnormal’, ‘Normal’ and Normalcy
Activism and protest (disability, feminist, LGBT, ‘race’, queer)
Austerity/welfare cuts
Body image, fetishisation, and the medicalization of bodies and minds
Desire, Sexuality, intimacy and relationships
Freakery, the abject and the politics of disgust
Health and Illness
Identities and identity politics
Life-course and ageing
Mental health and mad pride
Post-humanism
Queer and crip histories
Sex, sex educators and sex workers

Send us your ideas (around 200 words or half a page of bullet points) by 24th February 2014 to gender.disability@shef.ac.uk.

This will be a free event. Food will be available to buy at the venue. We want to make this event as accessible as possible, to inform us of any particular access requirements please email gender.disability@shef.ac.uk by 19th April 2014. For further information please contact gender.disability@shef.ac.uk. To book a place please go to: http://genderanddisability.wordpress.com.

Twitter: @GenDisability

An event hosted by the Disability Research Forum, Sheffield Hallam University and the Gender Research Network, University of Sheffield

Please distribute widely! Link to flyer here: Gender And Disability Call for Ideas

Children, Familes and Young People, Disability Studies and..., Inclusion, Majority/Minority Worlds, Publications

New book: Youth Responding to Lives: an International Reader

Youth: Responding to Lives – An International Reader

Edited by Andrew Azzopardi

Part of the Studies in Inclusive Education series edited by Roger Slee

Including a chapter by DRF member, Jenny Slater: Playing Grown-up: Using Critical Disability Perspectives to Rethink Youth

This book draws from various fields of knowledge, in an effort to theorise, create new and innovative conceptual platforms and develop further the hybrid idea of discourses around social inclusion and youth (from policy, practice and research perspectives).

Youth: Responding to lives – An international handbook attempts to fill the persistent gap in the problematisation and understanding of inclusion, communalism, citizenship – that are intertwined within the complex youth debate. It writhes and wriggles to highlight the interconnections between the encounters, events and endeavors in young people’s lives.

The focus of this edited work is also intended to help us understand how young people shape their development, involvement, and visibility as socio-political actors within their communities. It is this speckled experience of youth that remains one of the most electrifying stages in a community’s lifecycle.

Contributors to this text have engaged with notions around identity and change, involvement, social behavior, community cohesion, politics and social activism. The chapters offer an array of critical perspectives on social policies and the broad realm of social inclusion/exclusion and how it affects young people.

This book essentially analyses equal opportunities and its allied concepts, including inequality, inequity, disadvantage and diversity that have been studied extensively across all disciplines of social sciences and humanities but now need a youth studies ‘application’.

https://www.sensepublishers.com/catalogs/bookseries/studies-in-inclusive-education/youth-responding-to-lives/

Disability Studies and..., Events and Conferences

Seminar: Interdisciplinary dialogues in disability studies (16th Oct, 2-4pm, University of Sheffield)

You are cordially invited to the 2nd Interdisciplinary dialogues in disability studies at Sheffield University on 16th October 2013, 2 – 4 pm.

This roundtable will include the following contributions:

Rebecca Mallett – ‘From Geography with Love: Tales of a Disciplinary Nomad (With No Reference to Deleuze or Guatari)”

Jenny Slater – ‘I don’t know what my discipline is, but I just get cross about ‘reasonable-ness’ (‘cos it’s everywhere)’

Katie Hemear – ‘Investigation of disease and physical impairment from the study of human remains’

Katherine Runswick Cole and Dan Goodley – ‘Humanities and the Social Sciences: disability and the post-human’

G19 Elmfield Building, Northumberland Roadhttp://www.sheffield.ac.uk/ssid/maps/elmfield

All welcome!

Events and Conferences, Media and Culture

The Accentuate Symposium: Has there been a Cultural Shift? A Year on from the Paralympic Games

The Accentuate Symposium
Friday 5th July 2013
Sallis Benney Theatre, University of Brighton

Book tickets now

For further information on The Accentuate Symposium or to book a ticket to attend this event, please click on the following link: http://accentuatesymposium.eventbrite.co.uk
One year on from the Paralympic Games – what is the positive legacy for the Cultural Sector and what are the challenges and opportunities ahead of us?

As an incubator for ideas and leader of cultural discussion within the disability context, Accentuate is keen to explore if there has been a cultural shift for disabled people one year on from the hugely successful Paralympic Games.  Therefore we are partnering with The University of Brighton to bring together leaders within the cultural sector to discuss what is working well, as well as the challenges being faced.  This event seeks to explore how we consolidate gains a year on from the Paraylmpic Games and map the new territory.

The Paralympic Games offered a platform to profile disabled athletes at a level that had never been seen before.  Public attitudes were noticeably shifted, along with the sort of media attention which moved us from “tragic and brave” towards genuine discussion about sporting talent.  There was also a spotlight on creative talent, through the Cultural Olympiad events along with the spectacular opening ceremony for the Paralympic Games.  The future looked bright.  So where are we now?  It seems there may have been a reversion of focus.  Very many disabled people have real concerns and fears. So how can we continue the positive sea change in attitudes towards disabled people, that we witnessed during Games time, as well as providing real access to opportunities for disabled people to develop career pathways within the creative and cultural industries?

At this critical juncture we must provide evidence of the success stories and celebrate, because without these, how can we regret their potential loss?

The Accentuate Symposium, in partnership with the University if Brighton, on 5th July 2013 at the Sallis Benney Theatre, Brighton, will bring together key academics, cultural leaders and disabled people to provide a platform to spark this discussion.   A headline panel debate will be followed by three further panels exploring Disability Heritage and the Built Environment, Artists working in the Public Realm and Disabled Young People Building Resilience.  Accentuate will also premier a new animated short lecture by Dr. Tom Shakespeare which will introduce some of the key themes for the headline panel.
All panels will encourage questions from the floor, or at the time of booking tickets.  There will also be opportunities for people to take part in the debate through live streaming and Twitter feeds.

Symposium Programme

Animated Lecture, Dr. Tom Shakespeare

Headline Panel: How do we consolidate the gains and map new territory, a year on from the Paralympic Games?

Chair: Esther Fox, Accentuate Programme Director
Panellists:

  • Liz Crow, Artist and Activist
  • Hannah Morgan, Lancaster University
  • Professor Nick Watson, Strathclyde Centre for Disability Research
  • Dr Alison Wilde, Bangor University
  • Hannah Morgan, Lancaster University
  • Jamie Beddard, Actor and Director
  • Rachel Gadsden, Artist and performer
  • John Harris, Paralympian

Case Study Panel 1:  Young Voices Challenge and Change.

Chair:  Kristina Veasey, Paralympian, Artist and Accentuate Ideas Hub Member
Panellists:

  • Kim Aumann, Director of ART Amaze and part of the University of Brighton’s resilience department
  • William Jessop, Writer and Filmmaker, Blue Apple Theatre
  • Adam Simmons, Young participant
  • Vicky Hope Walker, Driving Inspiration

Case Study Panel 2: Disability Heritage: Disabled People Shaping the Built Environment throughout the Ages.

Chair:  Colin Hambrook, Writer and Editor of Disability Arts Online and Accentuate Ideas Hub Member
Panellists:

  • Rosie Sherrington, Social Inclusion and Diversity Advisor, English Heritage
  • Dr David Bonnet, Architect and specialist in inclusive design
  • John D Walker, Senior Research Fellow, Deaf History, CUPP, University of Brighton
  • Mark Ware, Installation Artist

Case Study Panel 3: Disabled Artists Forging Careers in the Public Realm.

Chair:  Jon Adams, Artist and Accentuate Ideas Hub Member
Panellists:

  • Jonathan Banks, Chief Executive of Public Art Think Tank, Ixia
  • Wendy Mason, Director, AA2A, Artists Accessing Art Colleges
  • Carole McFadden, Drama & Dance Adviser for East Asia, China & Hong Kong, Middle East and North Africa, Arts Group, British Council
  • Zoe Partington

Closing remarks – Vidar Hjardeng MBE

We will also be showing a series of specially commissioned films which include contributions from: Dame Evelyn Glennie, Jenny Sealy MBE, Sophie Christiansen OBE, Dr David Bonnett RIBA FRSA, Nicholas McCarthy, Mat Fraser, Laurence Clark, Katherine Araniello, Hannah Cockroft MBE and David Proud.

There will be an opportunity for drinks and networking at the end of the event.

During drinks and networking you will also be invited to view the MA Inclusive Arts Practice Exhibition, which will be taking place in the Foyer next to the Sallis Benney Theatre.

The Accentuate Symposium is held in partnership with the University of Brighton.
Book tickets now

For further information on The Accentuate Symposium or to book a ticket to attend this event, please click on the following link: http://accentuatesymposium.eventbrite.co.uk
For further information on The Accentuate Symposium email: info@accentuateuk.org