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Disability & Society Call for Papers: Special Issue 2019

Disability, Activism and the Academy: Time for Renewal?

Our 2019 Special Issue aims at keeping alive the original values and intentions of the journal to bridge the gap between the academy and activists in the disability arena. Through the pages of Disability & Societywe have always wanted to reflect debates and struggles taking place locally, nationally and internationally to improve the lives of disabled people according to the priorities of disabled people themselves.In the next Special Issue we wish to bring together fresh insights into the relationship between disability, activism and the academy and to explore how this is playing out against the backdrop of very difficult times in which disabled people are bearing the brunt of global upheavals and conflicts, austerity policies and the changing nature of political activism amongst disabled people.

We invite contributions which will examine the relationship between disability, the academy and activism in relation to any chosen themes. Back in our first Editorial of 1986 it was said ‘we do not wish the journal to be viewed as a vehicle for merely representing professional perspectives. Thus we want to encourage the consumers of services and people with disabilities to speak for themselves’. We strongly encourage articles written in partnership for the Special Issue, though this is not a prerequisite for submission.

Submissions might focus on:

  • Examples of collaborative activist projects
  • Inclusive research and development strategies
  • The role of changing technologies in activism
  • How accessible is the academy?
  • Power relationships and the reality of participation in decision-making processes
  • Disability policy and service user agendas
  • The work of service user representative organisations
  • Globalisation and the changing nature of political activism amongst disabled people
  • Papers which seek to place debates within the conditions of oppression shared by others involved in liberation struggles.

There is an established well-informed international audience for the journal. Authors are expected to consider this wide readership and to exhibit knowledge of previously-published articles when submitting their work for consideration.

This Special Issue will be published in 2019.

Submission Procedures

Submissions should be made online at the Disability & Society ScholarOne Manuscript site  New users should first create an account. Once a user is logged onto the site submissions should be made via the Author Centre.  Maximum word length is 8,000 words (excluding bibliography).

The final deadline for receipt of papers is 31st August 2018.
No papers will be considered after this date.

For further advice on the submission procedure please go to:
Disability and Society
http://tandfonline.com/CDSO

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Next week’s Disability Research Forum events, 15 and 18 January

This January, we will have three events that are chaired by the Disability Research Forum.

The Disability Reading Group and subsequent DRF session will take place on the 15th of January in Arundel 10212A.

During the Disability Reading Group session from 12:30pm to 2pm, we will discuss the following two articles:

Garland-Thomson, R. (2005) “Feminist Disability Studies.” Journal of Women in Culture and Society. 30(2). 1557-1587.

And:

St Pierre, J. (2015) “Distending Straight-Masculine Time: a phenomenology of the disable speaking body.” Hypatia. 30(1).  

The Disability Research Forum session from 2pm to 4pm will feature two speakers.

Our first speaker is Dr Emma Sheppard from Edge Hill University

Considering Crip Time

This paper presents an exploration of why the notion of crip time should be expanded within cripistemologies that consider fatigue, pain, and brain fog – to include experiences of “pacing,” thinking, and living slowly

Our second speaker is Dr Ella Houston from Liverpool Hope University

Disabled Women and Advertising Myths

My presentation is adapted from my PhD research, focusing on the representation of disabled women in UK and US advertising and the extent to which cultural stereotypes may impact on disabled women’s subjective wellbeing. In my presentation, I provide examples of participant analyses and my own analyses of three ads portraying women with mobility impairment, mental health issues and visual impairment. I focus on the ways in which advertising representations of disabled women dominantly support ‘inclusionism’, to use Mitchell and Snyder’s (2015) term, rather than authentic inclusion of bodily and mental health diversity.

 

On the 18th of January at 2-4pm in Arundel 10212B, we will hold a roundtable event on the Around the Toilet research project called Toilet Roundtable: Conversations about Gender, Disability and Access. This will be led by Dr Jenny Slater, Dr Charlotte Jones, and Dr Jill Pluquailec. 

In this round table we will introduce the Around the Toilet project (aroundthetoilet.com). We will then offer a series of provocations to begin a discussion about toilets, but also wider issues of gender, disability and access. By doing this we will show that although toilets are portrayed as mundane, they in fact, anything but. Toilets not only reflect but also shape socio-cultural-political understandings of who is and isn’t welcome in particular spaces; they teach us about whose bodies matter; and, indeed, the ways that we are able to live our embodied lives.

NB: although this round-table will be largely discussion based, people will be able to engage in various different ways, including speaking, writing, drawing, or just listening. We also always welcome thoughts on Twitter via @cctoilettalk #cctoilettalk

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January’s Disability Research Forum session

January’s disability session will take place on Monday the 15th of January at 2-4pm in Arundel 10212A.

Our first speaker is Dr Emma Sheppard from Edge Hill University

Considering Crip Time

This paper presents an exploration of why the notion of crip time should be expanded within cripistemologies that consider fatigue, pain, and brain fog – to include experiences of “pacing,” thinking, and living slowly

Our second speaker is Dr Ella Houston from Liverpool Hope University

Disabled Women and Advertising Myths

My presentation is adapted from my PhD research, focusing on the representation of disabled women in UK and US advertising and the extent to which cultural stereotypes may impact on disabled women’s subjective wellbeing. In my presentation, I provide examples of participant analyses and my own analyses of three ads portraying women with mobility impairment, mental health issues and visual impairment. I focus on the ways in which advertising representations of disabled women dominantly support ‘inclusionism’, to use Mitchell and Snyder’s (2015) term, rather than authentic inclusion of bodily and mental health diversity

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PhD opportunity at Sheffield Hallam University: Exploring the lives of trans, non-binary and gender nonconforming disabled young people

Project Lead: Dr Jen Slater (j.slater@shu.ac.uk)

A recent report from the UK Anti-Bullying Alliance (2017) indicated that disabled young people are often not believed when they say that they are trans. Noting this, and a general lack of qualitative research documenting the experience of trans and non-binary disabled children and young people, you will develop qualitative methods to explore the lives of trans and non-binary disabled young people. You are free to develop a proposal within this broad remit, which may wish to concentrate on a particular context (e.g. schools, families, youth services, media representation, age-group). Applications which critique medicalised approaches are particularly welcome.

It is anticipated that the project would lead to public and professional engagement activities that could inform popular perceptions and understandings, and likely lead to impact on practice in education settings, and across voluntary and youth sector services. In turn this could contribute to potentially marginalised young people’s wellbeing. This impact will be supported via the supervisors’ existing activities and relationships with relevant public bodies and voluntary sector organisations. Our aim would always be to extend dissemination well beyond the academy. The supervisors in Sheffield Institute of Education (SIoE) have experience of accessing further funding to support such activities, for example having run various successful ESRC Festival of Social Science events previously.

Successful applicants will receive the additional benefits of involvement with the White Rose Doctoral Training Partnership Education, Childhood, and Youth Pathway.

How to apply

Applicants must email a postgraduate application form (including a 1500 word proposal) to fdsresearch@shu.ac.uk by 17:00 on Wednesday 24 January 2018. At this stage, you only need to include the names and contact details for referees and do not have to request references.

We strongly recommend that you contact the theme lead
to discuss and develop your research proposal before submitting your application form. Please indicate clearly in your email whether you would like to be considered for: • Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) Scholarship offered by the Faculty of Development and Society • University PhD scholarship • White Rose Doctoral Training Partnership scholarship • All scholarship schemes

Please note – GTA scholarship holders will be expected to contribute to the resourcing of the student experience during their second and third years of study, either through seminar teaching or some other form of student support. This forms part of the terms and conditions of the scholarship and there is no additional payment for it.

Successful applicants who are studying for a masters qualification must complete their course of study before taking up their PhD place.

Fees are paid at home/EU levels only. Where English is not your first language, you must show evidence of English language ability to the following minimum level of proficiency: an overall IELTS score of 7.0 or above, with at least 7.0 in each component or an accepted equivalent. Please note that your test score must be current, i.e. within the last two years.

Please view our eligibility criteria before submitting an application.

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Postponement of the Around the Toilet event to 18 January

We are sorry to announce that the Around the Toilet roundtable discussion, planned on the 7th of December, has been cancelled. It has been moved to Thursday the 18th of January at 2-4pm in Arundel 10212B.

As a refresher, this is the abstract:

In this round table we will introduce the Around the Toilet project (aroundthetoilet.com). We will then offer a series of provocations to begin a discussion about toilets, but also wider issues of gender, disability and access. By doing this we will show that although toilets are portrayed as mundane, they in fact, anything but. Toilets not only reflect but also shape socio-cultural-political understandings of who is and isn’t welcome in particular spaces; they teach us about whose bodies matter; and, indeed, the ways that we are able to live our embodied lives.

NB: although this round-table will be largely discussion based, people will be able to engage in various different ways, including speaking, writing, drawing, or just listening. We also always welcome thoughts on Twitter via @cctoilettalk #cctoilettalk

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Autism Dialogue session series at the Hubs

Sheffield Hallam University will host a new session series called Autism Dialogue for all Autistic students and staff at any university.

These sessions will be held in the Common Room at The Hubs (the Sheffield Hallam Student Union Building, Paternoster Row)

The sessions will take place at every 2nd Tuesday of the month starting Dec 8th from 1.30pm – 5pm

There are 30 spaces available. No previous experience is necessary.

Info and booking: http://bit.ly/2zFHM13

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Call for Papers: Emotional Politics. The Role of Affect in Social Movements and Organizing, University of Kent

Thursday, 31 May 2018

University of Kent, Canterbury, UK

Confirmed Keynote Speaker: Dr Carolyn Pedwell (University of Kent)

This one-day interdisciplinary conference will bring together academic researchers, activists, policy-makers and practitioners to exchange and discuss current concerns and developments in the research and practice surrounding emotion, organizing and social movements.

Veteran activist and scholar Angela Y. Davis (2016) claims that in order for a movement to be effective it needs to mobilize the masses. How does one do this? What motivates people to join a movement, especially if they are not directly affected by the campaign’s agenda and the successful implementation of its goals? Deborah Gould (2009) argues that the purposeful channelling of emotion can be decisive for the success or failure of a movement. Recent campaigns such as Black Lives Matter or the Women’s Marches, though US-centric, have managed to garner the support from millions of people worldwide. According to Carolyn Pedwell (2014) and Sara Ahmed (2004), the key lies in the relational nature of such elusive terms as emotion, feeling and affect and their ability to circulate between subjects and objects. How can organizers and campaigners make use of these characteristics? What problems may arise in the concrete experience of organizing?

Themes for papers may include (but are not restricted to):

  • Politics, emotion, and affect
  • Social movements, rights-based action, campaigning and protest (for example, LGBTQI+, disability, human rights)
  • NGOs and non-profit organisations
  • Critical race, gender, and cultural studies
  • Queer, trans and feminist activisms
  • Legal and political studies perspectives
  • Political theologies and philosophies
  • Queer and non-binary phenomenologies
  • Alienation and engagements
  • Practice-based activism and activist-scholars
  • Influencing policy and policy formation

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words for a twenty-minute research paper to emotionalpolitics@gmail.com by Friday, 22 December 2017.

We also welcome contributions by activists and practitioners on their experience of the role of affect and emotion in their work. Please submit a proposal of no more than 250 words for a 10-minute presentation.

Postgraduates and early career researchers are particularly encouraged to submit proposals.

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December’s Disability Reading Group

December’s Disability Reading Group session will take place on the 11th of December at  1pm until 2pm in Arundel 10212B

Emma Rice, who will speak at the DRF session on the same day, has proposed the following article and questions to think about:

Justine Mercer (2007) The challenges of insider research in educational institutions: wielding a double‐edged sword and resolving delicate dilemmas, Oxford Review of Education, 33:1, 1-17, DOI: 10.1080/03054980601094651

When reading this methodological paper please consider the following:

  • Where might you place yourself in relation to the insider/ outsider position within research?
  • Does this lead to any conflicts or challenges for your research?
  • What relevance do these debates have to disability research?
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Around the Toilet event, 7 December

This event will be held in collaboration with the Around the Toilet project on the 7th of December at 1-3pm in Arundel 10111, Charles Street, Sheffield Hallam University City Campus.

Toilet Roundtable: Conversations about Gender, Disability and Access – Jenny Slater, Charlotte Jones and Jill Pluquailec

In this round table we will introduce the Around the Toilet project (aroundthetoilet.com). We will then offer a series of provocations to begin a discussion about toilets, but also wider issues of gender, disability and access. By doing this we will show that although toilets are portrayed as mundane, they in fact, anything but. Toilets not only reflect but also shape socio-cultural-political understandings of who is and isn’t welcome in particular spaces; they teach us about whose bodies matter; and, indeed, the ways that we are able to live our embodied lives.

NB: although this round-table will be largely discussion based, people will be able to engage in various different ways, including speaking, writing, drawing, or just listening. We also always welcome thoughts on Twitter via @cctoilettalk #cctoilettalk