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CFP: ‘The Biopolitics of Art Education’ for Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

Journal: Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

Call for Papers for Special Issue: The Biopolitics of Art Education

Guest Editors: Claire Penketh (Disability and Education, Liverpool Hope University) and Jeff Adams (Education, University of Chester)

In The Biopolitics of Disability David Mitchell and Sharon Snyder argue that “curriculum needs to contextualize the lives of crip/queer people in order to create a context of receptivity for a more productive interaction with the embodied differences of crip/queer lives in school.” This special issue seeks to explore the ways art education might respond to such a call to develop disability pedagogy and curriculum content with “the active participation of crip/queer subjects.”

Art education has been long recognised and valued for its contribution to learning for children, young people, and adults. More recently there have been moves to explore art education as critical social practice, recognising the importance of art education to identity work. Although lines have been drawn around visual arts education, moves to incorporate contemporary practices have resulted in a more expansive range of approaches (e.g., video installations, performance art, and conceptual art pieces examining the use of text and ready-mades). However, art education has also been subject to criticisms of anachronistic and exclusionary practice.

This special issue asks: is there a need for curriculum reform in order to make crip/queer content integral to art education? How can art education respond to the request for creative pedagogies that resist processes of normalization? How can art education learn from people’s differences? How can literary and cultural representations of disability inform pedagogies in art education? Where does art education fit in recent developments in Disability Studies? How can Disability Studies be informed by recent research in art education?

Please email a one-page proposal to penketc@hope.ac.uk and j.adams@chester.ac.uk by April 1, 2017. Contributors can expect to be selected and notified by June 1, 2017. (Full drafts of the selected articles will be due on March 1, 2018). Please direct any questions to either guest editor.

 

 

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Event: Sexuality Summer School 2014 (26th-30th May: Manchester, UK) @SSS_Manchester

Event: Sexuality Summer School 2014 – 3 Public Lectures (free and all welcome)

Dates: 26th – 30th May 2014

Programme: please find detailed below.

  • Monday 26 May – 12pm-2pm: Professor Jasbir Puar (Rutgers) ‘A Body with New Organs: Becoming Trans, Becoming Disabled’

Venue: Manchester Museum, Oxford Rd, Kanaris LT (1st Floor)

In this paper Puar historically situates the most current intersectional flavors of the day, “trans” and “disabled,” through their emergence as the latest newcomers to the intersectional fray.  She looks at how their parallel yet rarely intersecting epistemological constructs—both come into being, or becoming, in the early 90s in the academy as well as in broader political terms and movements—require exceptionalizing both the trans body and the disabled body in order to convert the debility of a non-normative body into a form of social and cultural capacity, whether located in state recognition, identity politic formations, market economies, the medical industrial complex, or subject positioning.

  • Tuesday 27 May 4pm-6pm: Professor Valerie Traub (University of Michigan and Simon Visiting Professor, Manchester) ‘Anatomy, Cartography, and the Prehistory of Normality’

Venue: John Casken Lecture Theatre, Martin Harris Centre, Oxford Rd, University of Manchester. Sponsored by EAC, SEXGEN and Pride. Followed by wine reception at Contact Theatre.

During the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, European cartographers and anatomists developed novel strategies for representing the diversity of human bodies in their atlases of the world and its inhabitants. Tracking their implicit taxonomies of gender, sexuality, race, and class, Valerie Traub speculates on the effects of their strategies on the historical emergence of the concept of “the normal.”

  • Thursday 29 May – 5pm-7om: Public Lecture by Professor Mary Bryson (University of British Columbia) and Chase Joynt (Chicago) ‘ Biopolitics Under the Skin: Relating Cancer Narratives – An Archive of the ‘Talking Dead’?’

Venue: John Casken Lecture Theatre, Martin Harris Centre, University of Manchester. Followed by wine reception at Kro.

This talk situates the Cancer’s Margins project (www.lgbtcancer.ca) and its preliminary findings in an overview of feminist, postcolonial, and queer biopolitical scholarship. concerning anatomy, pathographies, embodiment, chronicity and new analytic modes of technomaterialism that have foregrounded and articulated complex and discontinuous assemblages that twist, warp and reimagine modernity’s bedrock binaries, including ‘alive<>dead’, ‘real <>fiction’, ‘subject<>object’, ‘now<>then’ and so on. This lecture will engage with the opportunity, and perhaps, the obligation, to think critically about the move to delimit historically, and as a gesture to an entirely different futurity, the time when a biopolitics of embodied humanism was organized in a relation of explicit politicization.

 

The Sexuality Summer School is sponsored this year by the Faculty of Humanities; Cornerhouse; Contact; Manchester Pride; Screen; Science, Stroke, Art 2014; and SEXGEN.

For more information about the Sexuality Summer School, including details of previous events, go to sexualitysummerschool.wordpress.com, email us and get on the mailing list at sexualitysummerschool@gmail.com, find Sexuality Summer School on Facebook or tweet us @SSS_Manchester.