DRF News, Publications

CFP: Critical Disability Discourse / Discours Critiques Dans Le Champ Du Handicap

Critical Disability Discourse / Discours Critiques Dans Le Champ Du Handicap

** Call for Papers **

Critical Disability Discourse is a bilingual, interdisciplinary journal, publishing articles that focus on experiences of disability from a critical perspective. It was launched in November 2009 by York University’s Critical Disability Studies Graduate Student Program (www.yorku.ca/gradcdis). The journal considers articles from graduate scholars in a variety of academic fields, but undergraduate students, activists, and community members/organizers are also invited to contribute. Critical Disability Discourse’s goals are to provide emerging scholars with an opportunity to contribute to the expanding field of critical disability studies and to gain exposure for their work in the public sphere.

Next Submission deadline is March 1, 2014.

 

Possible topics can include but are not limited to the following:

  • • Critical theory and disability: feminism, post-modernism, postcolonial theory, transnational analysis, Marxism, etc.
  • • History of disability: Antiquity, Middle Ages, Victorian Age, Industrial Age, etc.
  • • Law and public policy, and disability
  • • Qualitative and quantitative research pertaining to disability
  • • Education and disability
  • • Culture: disability-related popular culture, television, videos, blogs, arts, literature and film analysis
  • • Employment, market, workforce, and income security in relation to disability
  • • Disability-related topics in social sciences: psychology, sociology, geography, political science
  • • Assessment of accessibility accommodations
  • • Technology and disability

 

Submission guidelines are as follows:

1. Articles must critically address a question about an aspect of disability and offer a new angle of thought and insight; they should contribute to scholarship in the field of Critical Disability Studies. Articles must involve a critical argument, rather than be only descriptive.

2. Articles must be submitted in either English or French. Authors must consent to the translation of their articles for publication.

3. In submitting a manuscript, authors affirm that the research is original and unpublished, is not in press or under consideration elsewhere, and will not be submitted elsewhere while under consideration by the journal.

4. Articles must be 3,000-7,000 words (including quotations, references, footnotes, tables, figures, diagrams, and illustrations).

5. In promoting inclusion and accessibility, the journal accepts and encourages tables, figures, diagrams, and illustrations within the article. However, all tables, figures, diagrams, and illustrations must include detailed written descriptions.

6. An abstract of 100-150 words should summarize the main arguments and themes of the article, the methods and results obtained, if the author’s own research was conducted, and the conclusions reached. A list of 5-7 keywords should also be included after the abstract.

7. We ask that authors are mindful of their language choices pertaining to disability and that they justify the use of controversial words.

8. Articles are peer-reviewed. Authors’ names and other identifying information must be removed in order to be sent to reviewers.

9. Authors are responsible for ethics approval for manuscripts by receiving approval from their own institutions. Proof of ethics approval (if applicable) should be provided to the journal.

10. The journal’s style generally follows the most recent edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association; English spelling follows the most recent edition of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary.

11. Manuscripts must be entirely double-spaced (including quotations, notes, references) in 12-point Times New Roman font.

12. The journal accepts footnotes, but only sparingly.

 

To submit, register as an author on our website:  https://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index.php/cdd and undergo the submission process.  Registration is free.

If you have any questions, contact CDD Managerial Editor, Elisabeth Harrison, at cdsj@yorku.ca

For more information and updates, please visit http://cdssa.wordpress.com/

 

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DRF News

CFP: Borders without Boundaries: Canadian Disability Studies Association 2014 Annual Conference (May 2014, Canada)

Call for Papers

Borders without Boundaries: Canadian Disability Studies Association 2014 Annual Conference

Date: Wednesday May 28 – Friday May 30, 2014

Where: Brock University, St. Catherines Ontario, Canada

**DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS: extended to 15 November 2013**

The Canadian Disability Studies Association invites abstract submissions for papers to be presented at the 11th annual conference to be held at Brock University. Our CDSA meeting is part of the larger Congress 2014 of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

CDSA’s 2014 theme “Borders without Boundaries” reflects the overall Congress theme. We are seeking contributions that demonstrate the ways in which disability challenges, disturbs or blurs the borders of taken for granted or privileged practices in the global north and south. Should your critical work exist beyond or outside of these margins, we still welcome your response to the call.

Submissions are peer-reviewed by panels composed of: faculty, students, and community members.

The five major subthemes are as follows:

1. A disability studies perspective on borders without boundaries

How are images and ideas of disability used to separate, settle and contest cultural divides, political divisions and/or geographic regions? This subtheme broadly considers the relationship between disability and nation-making. We welcome submissions that explore:

  • Disability in global culture and contexts
  • Transnationalisms, border crossings and cosmopolitanisms
  • Disability in relation to colonial continuums and post-/anti-colonial critiques
  • Disability in relation to Aboriginal/First Nations communities
  • Disability and environmental sustainability

2. Disability at the border of academic and activist scholarships

This subtheme broadly explores the tensions between the academic/activist interface. What counts as academic or activist work? What is valued? Can there be academic-activist scholarship? What is gained or loss in a blurring of these endeavours? We welcome submissions exploring:

  • How activism is conceptualized within and without disability studies
  • Disability activist scholarship in the academy
  • Disability studies outreach and education in community-based activism
  • Barriers and facilitators to academic-activist collaborations
  • Disability activist scholarship and social justice

3. Disability at disciplinary borders

This subtheme broadly explores where disability studies is found and placed within the academy. Presentations that consider what makes Canadian Disability Studies distinct are especially encouraged. We welcome submissions exploring:

  • The status and future directions of the field of disability studies in Canada and abroad
  • Professional development for Canadian disability studies students
  • The meaning and limitations of interdisciplinarity in contemporary educational regimes
  • Strategies for troubling, queering and cripping discipline in the academy

4. Disability at the border of mainstream arts and culture

This subtheme explores the ways in which the category of ‘disability’ actively and tacitly creates cultural references, while disability is often simultaneously excluded from mainstream cultural representations. We welcome submissions, including performances or artistic displays, exploring:

  • Arts-based research in disability studies
  • Performances or displays of disability art
  • Literary and cultural analyses using disability studies lenses
  • Historical/contemporary disability communities and cultures

5. Beyond the boundaries of the bordered body – embodiment, technology and virtual spaces

This subtheme explores how disability troubles unexamined relations to the meaning and appearance of “bodies” and embodied relations. We welcome submissions exploring:

  • Disability and the materiality of the body
  • Disability, desire, gender and sexuality
  • Disability, race and racialization
  • The meaning of the ‘human’ and human/technology interfaces

Abstract guidelines:

All session formats are 90 minutes in length. There will be 3-4 papers per session and each paper will be 15-20 minutes in length depending upon the number of papers within the session.

Individual Papers – Individual presentations will be placed alongside two-three other panelists who share a similar focus. A submission will include the following: 1) name, affiliation and contact information 2) a biographical note: 100-150 words as a separate document 3) paper title and a 250 word abstract; the abstract should consist of the following:

  • stated purpose and relevance to one or more of the conference themes
  • significance of the proposal to the field
  • include relevant literature to support your abstract
  • explicit use of disability studies theory, perspective or concepts
  • describe how the work was done
  • contributions to research, theory, activism, advocacy or social change
  • 4 or 5 key words that describe your abstract
  • details of audiovisual needs (e.g. DVD, LCD projection, and/or VHS).

Panels (3-5 more persons) – People submitting a panel abstract are asked to identify and submit proposals around a central topic, theme, or approach. The abstract should include the following:

  • all information as stated in the Individual paper section as appropriate
  • a panel title and a 350 word abstract that illustrates the coherence between each of the panel presentations

Workshops – Interactive sessions organized around a central theme. People submitting workshops should include:

  • all information as stated in the Individual paper section as appropriate
  • workshop title and a 350 word abstract; the description of the workshop’s objectives and content should be as specific as possible

Performances –This may include poetry reading, dance, a viewing, or an installation. We will do our best to provide a suitable space but please be prepared to improvise! Abstract should include:

  • all information as stated in the Individual paper section as appropriate
  • a performance title and a 350 word abstract; the description of the performance content should be as specific as possible

Submission Guidelines

1. Submit via email attachment to: cdsa.acei@gmail.com – by 15 November 2013. The subject line should read, “CDSA-ACEI proposal for Borders without Boundaries”.

2. Attachments should be in pdf format.

3. Please send in two documents for each abstract.

a. One abstract document will have your name, affiliation and complete contact information.

b. The second abstract document must be anonymous. Do not put your name or any other identifying information on the abstract. In addition, be sure to anonymize your pdf document by clicking on “File”, then “Properties”, removing your name if it appears in the “Author” line, and resaving before uploading it. If any identifying information is included on the abstract, the abstract will be returned to the author unevaluated.

We anticipate notifying participants of abstract status by Dec 14, 2013. If your paper is accepted for the 11th CDSA-ACEI conference at Congress you will need to register for Congress as well as for CDSA-ACEI. Registration will be open starting mid-January 2014. Instructions for how to register will be posted at www.congress2014.ca/register. We would appreciate speakers registering by Jan 30, 2014. If this is not possible please email us.

DRF News

Event: 30th Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity (May 2014: Hawaii, USA)

Announcing the 30th Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity.

Theme: Learn from Yesterday. Live for Today. Envision Tomorrow.

Date: 19th – 20th May 2014

Place: Hawaii Convention Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.

For more information: 

 Proposal submissions deadline: 31st January 2014.

The event is preceded by the Pacific Rim International Forum on the Human Rights of Persons with Disabilities (17th May 2014) at Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii.

DRF News

Announcing 5th Annual International Conference ***Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane***: More Questions of the Human (July, 2014: Sheffield, UK)

Event: 5th Annual International Conference ***Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane***

Theme: More Questions of the Human

Date: 7th + 8th July 2014

Place: University of Sheffield, UK

follow on twitter @normalcy2014  #normalcy2014

This conference is organised by the University of Sheffield, Manchester Metropolitan University, Sheffield Hallam University, University of Chester, the University of Toronto in association with the White Rose Studies of Ableism Research collaboration.

The University of Sheffield is delighted to be hosting this conference in July 2014. This year our call for papers encourages engagement with the human and its historically problematic relationship with idealisations of the normal, the able and the non-disabled. The last 4 normalcy conferences have seriously contested and challenged these idealisations. For #normalcy2014 we seek to up the ante a little more and debate together what kinds of human/ity should be valued in our context of austerity, economic crisis and neoliberal capitalism. Some questions that might be addressed:

  • To what extent is ‘the human’ a desirable or problematic category?
  • In what ways do normative understandings underpin ‘universal’ notions of children’s humanity?
  • What does it mean to be post-human?
  • In these times of technological and human enmeshment does it make more sense to talk of the post-human than the outdated category of human?
  • Do we need to hang on to notions of de-humanisation as powerful political statements?
  • What do post-human politics resemble?
  • How do queer, dis/ability, postcolonial analyses evoke different or alternative notions of the human?
  • How might we (not) want to resist, revise and shape notions of the human?
  • Is the human worth fighting for?
  • To what extent is the human an ableist fiction?
  • To what extent are queers and crips nightmare characters to the narratives of humanity?

 

Abstracts of no more than 200 words (with a short bio) should be submitted by 1st February 2014 to the normalcy2014@gmail.com

Presenters will be informed of acceptance by 1st May 2014.  To secure a place in the conference programme, presenters should have booked a place by 30th May 2014. Keynotes will be announced before November 2013. In the spirit of an eco-friendly conference, registered delegates will be sent information electronically.  Details of accommodation near the venue will also be sent to delegates.

While the conference is FREE, we have secured funding for lunch and refreshments.  Please let us know if you have any dietary requirements so we can make the catering team aware of delegate requirements.

 

We look forward to welcoming you to Sheffield

Normalcy2014 conference organisers* in association with White Rose Studies of Ableism**

* Dan Goodley (UoS); Nick Hodge (SHU); Rebecca Mallett (SHU); Cassie Ogden (Univ of Chester); Katherine Runswick-Cole (MMU); Jenny Slater (SHU).
** http://whiterosestudiesofableism.wordpress.com/

 

DRF News

CFP: ‘Borders without Boundaries’ Canadian Disability Studies 2014 Annual Conference (May 2014, Canada)

Event: Borders without Boundaries: Canadian Disability Studies 2014 Annual Conference 

Date: Wednesday May 28- Friday May 30, 2014

Place: Brock University, St. Catherine’s, Ontario, Canada

Deadline For Abstract Submissions: 1 November 2013

The Canadian Disability Studies Association invites abstract submissions for papers to be presented at the 11th annual conference to be held at Brock University. Our CDSA meeting is part of the larger Congress 2014 of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

CDSA’s 2014 theme “Borders without Boundaries” reflects the overall Congress theme. We are seeking contributions that demonstrate the ways in which disability challenges, disturbs or blurs the borders of taken for granted or privileged practices in the global north and south. Should your critical work exist beyond or outside of these margins, we still welcome your response to the call.

More information can be found at: http://www.cdsa-acei.ca/CFP-Brock-2014-Final-%20Sept%2021.pdf

DRF News

CFP: 1st Global Conference: Sexuality and Disability (May 2014: Portugal)

Event: 1st Global Conference: Sexuality and Disability

Dates: Tuesday 6th May – Thursday 8th May 2014

Place: Lisbon, Portugal

Call For Presentations:

“Sexuality is an integral part of the personality of everyone: man, woman and child; it is a basic need and aspect of being human that cannot be separated from other aspects life.” (World Health Organisation)

Statistics suggest that over 50 percent of disabled people do not have a sex life, which is not surprising given the fact that disabled people are too often considered as non-sexual or asexual. Recent television programmes shown in the UK have attempted to document the sex and love lives of the disabled, The Undateables and Sex on Wheels (both Channel 4 TV). While such programmes can be seen as progressive in terms of acknowledging that disabled people want and/or have sex lives, moving away from the popular perception of disabled people as asexual, they also perpetuate the medical model of disability in which disability is constructed in sympathetic terms and portrayed in a voyeuristic fashion: disability as object of festishistic scopophilia. While social issue cinema continues to evoke sympathy rather than challenge conventions, horror cinema constructs disability not only as sexualised but often as monstrous abnormality linked with criminality. Images of disability may aim at evoking disgust through the construction of the discourse of abjection. In addition, the sex lives of the disabled are too often ignored within the arena of disability politics itself.

This conference seeks to challenge popular conceptions and perceptions of sexuality and disability. In addition to academic papers, we are particularly interested in opening up a space for the discussion of personal experiences of disability and sexuality and the role of sex workers, community programs and the work of sex educators. Inter-disciplinary and cross-disciplinary perspectives are sought on sexuality and disability, including cross-cultural
and transcultural perspectives. Non-traditional presentations are encouraged including workshops, performances and round table discussions.

Papers, presentations, workshops and pre-formed panels are also invited on any of the following themes:

1. Representations of Disability and Sexuality

– Visual images – painting, photography, advertising

– Moving images – television, film, video, theatre, performance art

– Music and disability – music videos, groups, artists

– Narratives of disability – poetry, biography, autobiography, fiction and non-fiction

2. Desire and Disability

– The fetishization of disability

– Normative/Non-normative desires

– Voyeurism and disability

– Eroticism and disability

– Disability and the politics of disgust

– Dating and disability

3. Gender and Disability

– Feminism and disability politics

– Femininity and Masculinity and disability

– Gender, class and disability

– Body image and disability

4. Sexualities of Disability

– queer, trans, and other non-normative sexualities

– disabilities and sexualities

– aging and sexuality

– appropriate versus inappropriate expressions of sexuality

5. Difference and Disability

– Visible/invisible disabilities

– Intellectual disabilities

– Mental health issues including depression

– Ethnicity, sexuality and disability

6. Sex Work and Disability

– Sex educators

– Sex workers

– Community programs

– State run programs

7. Law, Ethics, the State and Disability

– Eugenics and state stationed sterilisation

– Legislation, disability and sexuality

– Ethics, desire and disability

– Cultural conceptions of disability and sexuality

– Sexual abuse and disability

Presentations will also be considered on any related theme.

In order to support and encourage interdisciplinarity engagement, it is our intention to create the possibility of starting dialogues between the parallel events running during this conference. Delegates are welcome to attend up to two sessions in each of the concurrent conferences. We also propose to produce cross-over sessions between two and possibly all three groups – and we welcome proposals which deal with the relationship between the experience of prison, and/or responsible and ethical living and/or disability and sexuality.

What to send: 300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 6th December 2013 If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 14th March 2014. 300 word abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:

a) author(s), b) affiliation as you would like it to appear in programme, c)
email address, d) title of abstract, e) body of abstract, f) up to 10 keywords.

E-mails should be entitled: SD1 Abstract Submission.

Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

Organising Chairs:
Colette Balmain: cb@inter-disciplinary.net<mailto:cb@inter-disciplinary.net and Rob Fisher: sd1@inter-disciplinary.net<mailto:sd1@inter-disciplinary.net

The conference is part of the Gender and Sexuality programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and
exciting. All papers accepted for and presented at the conference will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected papers may be developed for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s). All publications from the
conference will require editors, to be chosen from interested delegates from the conference.

For further details of the conference, please visit: http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/critical-issues/gender-and-sexuality/sexuality-and-disability/call-for-presentations/

Events and Conferences

CFP: 2nd Annual INSPIRe Virtual Symposium September 8-21, 2013

International Network of Student Perspectives in Research

Exploring ability expectations through diverse disciplines and topics

The Wolb Pack, a team of inter- and trans-disciplinary undergraduate and graduate research students based at the University of Calgary are pleased to announce a call for abstracts for the 2nd annual INSPIRe virtual symposium. The conference theme is “Exploring ability expectations through diverse disciplines and topics”.

Who should participate?

You should participate if you are an undergraduate or graduate studies student of a post-secondary institution/organization.

Aims of the conference

The aims of this conference are to:

  1. Encourage student discussion regarding socio-cultural ability expectations.
  2. Provide a peer-reviewed opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to showcase their work.
  3. Provide a platform for dialogue and networking without the costs of travel and conference fees.

Potential topics of submission

Topics may engage a variety of social groups (e.g. disabled people, ethnic minorities, gender,

socioeconomic status, immigrants, migrants, etc.) and discussion of ability expectations. Suggestions of topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Ableism
  • Aging
  • Bodybuilding
  • Bullying
  • Bionics
  • Climate change
  • Disability studies
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Energy issues
  • Environmental justice
  • ‘Eco-ability’
  • Equity and equality
  • Ethics
  • Eugenics
  • Feminist approach to ability expectations
  • Future of communication
  • Technologies and ability expectations
  • Global outlook
  • Health consumerism
  • Health science technology and health care
  • Human development
  • Human enhancement
  • Human security
  • Immigrant policies
  • Indigenous studies
  • Local outlook
  • Media discourses and representation of various social groups
  • Organ donation and transplantation
  • Peace
  • Privacy and health science technologies
  • Prospects of artificial wombs
  • Racism
  • Science and technology governance
  • Sensory systems
  • Social determinants of health
  • Social justice
  • Social robots
  • Social well-being
  • Sport
  • Sustainability
  • Sustainability and economics
  • The human body
  • Water issues

Full call for papers see here (Deadline 30 July 2013)

DRF News

CFP: Sexualities Special Issue ‘Intellectual Disability and Sexuality: On the Agenda?’

Papers are called for that consider…

Issues relating to intellectual disability regarding sex, childrearing and intimacy are considered contentious at the best of times. This is often couched in discourses of danger, risk and protection. But it is clear that intellectually disabled people have been subject to physical and sexual abuse, excluded and marginalised from relationships and sex education, struggled with their own health and wellbeing and represented as ‘less than human’ and therefore lack capacity to make decisions about their own sexuality. In addition, all of the above have an impact upon everyday life, family members and carers. The lack of sexual and physical autonomy is further compounded in social discourse as in the case where a British mother defended her right, before the courts, to have her young disabled daughters’ womb removed. Conversely, attention has also been drawn to young disabled people and their sexual activity or sexuality in a positive and proactive light. The Family Planning Association (fpa) in the UK dedicated their Sexual Health Week in August 2008, to campaign for the rights of disabled people to have sex and relationships. With these tensions and dilemmas in mind it makes sense to dedicate a special issue to intellectual disability.

If you would like to contribute an original article based on empirical, theoretical or policy research in the areas of intellectual disability regarding: sexuality and rights, intimacy, sexual health, sex and education, sex work, abuse/violence, same sex relationships, gender, dating, mothering and so on please send a 300 word abstract to me (details below) with a working title before 30th September 2013.

The final papers will be 6-7000 maximum. Other innovative shorter pieces, commentary, or response pieces will also be considered if deemed appropriate in this issue. All papers will be anonymously peer reviewed and go through the usual academic rigour. Please contact me with abstract, title, and/or questions. 

Dr Chrissie Rogers: c.rogers3@aston.ac.uk Languages and Social Sciences, Aston University (Birmingham, UK)

Uncategorized

CFP: ‘This is my Body’ Conference: Nov, 2013 – Cambridge, UK

 

Conference Title:  This is my Body

Dates: Monday, 18 November 2013 – Tuesday, 19 November 2013
Location: William Harvey Lecture Theatre, Addenbrooke’s Clinical School, University of Cambridge, UK

Conveners: Dr Olivia Will (Department of Surgery, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, UK) and Dr Lucy Razzall (Faculty of English, University of Cambridge, UK)

Summary: The relationship between the mind and the body raises innumerable challenging questions across the arts, humanities, and social science disciplines. For those who come into professional contact with the human body every day in the National Health Service, the mind and the body are usually considered distinct from each other. This is even reflected in the organisational structure of the NHS, where mental health trusts are separate from other healthcare services. Any medical interpretation of the human body, even while it is grounded in empirical evidence, is also inevitably shaped by the intricacies of cultural context, but this is often overlooked in contemporary medicine.

Keynote speaker:Ludmilla Jordanova (King’s College London, UK)

Call for Papers: This two-day conference aims to return human experience to the centre of medical discussion by bringing scholars of the body from across the arts, humanities, and social sciences together with medical and surgical practitioners from the National Health Service. In engaging with the human body from a wide range of perspectives, this conference will explore the ways in which understandings, experiences, and representations of the body beyond the traditional medical sphere might inform healing and healthcare. This interdisciplinary conference will be the first of its kind ever held at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, and will establish an important new interface between the academy and the National Health Service.

We invite proposals (250 words) for 20-minute papers from graduate students and senior scholars in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, and from medical students and medical/surgical professionals, which will offer disciplinary perspectives on the human body and experiences of embodiment. Papers could address, but are not restricted to, any aspect of the following:

  • physical and mental illness: treatment and recovery
  • roles, identities, and relationships of patients, carers, and doctors
  • injury, wounds, and healing
  • trauma and disfigurement
  • pain and suffering
  • gender and sexuality
  • life-cycles: birth, childhood, puberty, reproduction, ageing, frailty, death 

Please email your proposal to conferences@crassh.cam.ac.uk. Any informal enquiries may be addressed to the conveners, Olivia Will and Lucy Razzall.

The deadline for submission is 31 July 2013.

DRF News

CFP: Special issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies on ‘Disability and the American Counterculture’

Proposals are requested for a special issue of the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies on ‘Disability and the American Counterculture’.

Guest edited by Stella Bolaki and Chris Gair

The American Counterculture has a complex relationship with disability. At its heart is the reinvention of the term freak that serves as an early example of empowering, though not unproblematic, appropriation of what had previously been a derogatory term. Freak Out!, the debut album by The Mothers of Invention—labelled a “monstrosity” by Frank Zappa—is a prime example of the association of freakery with the forms of avant-garde experimentation representative of one form of countercultural practice. In addition, representations of disability and illness occur repeatedly in countercultural work: the asylum and hospital become central tropes for examinations of the relationship between sanity and madness in Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, while canonical Beat/countercultural novels such as Jack Kerouac’s Desolation Angels and Richard Brautigan’s Trout Fishing in America and movies such as Richard Rush’s Psych-Out feature disabled characters not only to derive rhetorical force in their critique of hegemonic culture, but also to question core countercultural ideologies. In terms of aesthetics, William Burroughs’ experimental “cut-up technique” has been discussed in the context of his interest in virology and Andy Warhol’s work of trauma, injury and violence alongside what Tobin Siebers has called “disability aesthetics”. More recent work, such as E.L. Doctorow’s novel Homer and Langley, the Hollywood film Forrest Gump and Simi Linton’s memoir My Body Politic, examines the connection between disability and the counterculture through different lenses and with various aims.

What do perspectives informed by disability studies have to offer to typical readings of the American counterculture and its fundamental ideals of movement (both geographical and ideological), youth and vitality? In what ways did the American counterculture and the disability movement approach notions of the “normal” and the “abnormal” body? Beat and countercultural writers and artists have been criticised for their romanticised view of other cultures and for appropriating and shedding roles and personas from various marginalised groups at a dizzying pace. How different was the appropriation of disability to the American counterculture’s interest in other cultures (Eastern, African American, Native American) and their potential for constructing a subversive identity? What are the legacies of the American counterculture and its various discourses and styles of liberation for contemporary disability life writing, arts and activism? With such questions in mind, the co-editors invite proposals on an array of topics which include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • perspectives from disability studies/theory on iconic as well as understudied Beat texts and countercultural ideals more broadly
  • challenges to “normalcy” from disability movements and the American counterculture (comparative perspectives/debates)
  • disability as theme and/or aesthetic in countercultural writing, art, film and music or in more recent works that reference the American counterculture
  • appropriation and reinvention of the term “freak” by the counterculture
  • approaches to spectacle, the stare, the performative, and fashion in American counterculture and disability cultures/arts
  • disability in the sixties-era communes and communal living groups
  • feminist disability studies and the counterculture
  • crip perspectives on the American counterculture
  • legacies of the American counterculture and countercultural ideals, practices and styles for disability writing, arts, and activism

Discussions of specific literary and cultural texts are invited, but preference will be given to projects that use individual texts as vehicles to address broader cultural debates and theoretical inquiries related to disability studies and the American counterculture.

A one-page proposal and a one-page curriculum vitae should be emailed to S.Bolaki@kent.ac.uk and Chris.Gair@glasgow.ac.uk by the end of July 2013.

Finalists will be selected by 1st October 2013, and full drafts of articles will be due on 1st March 2014.