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Event: Next Steps for Policy on Children and Young People’s Health (February, 2017; London, UK)

Event: Next Steps for Policy on Children and Young People’s Health

Date: Thursday, 2nd February 2017

Place: Central London

Guest of Honour: Dr Jacqueline Cornish, National Clinical Director, Children, Young People and Transition to Adulthood, NHS England

Policymakers and stakeholders at this seminar will discuss next steps for improving children and young people’s health outcomes in England. Delegates will consider the early impact of new models of care on better coordinating children and young people’s health services, and the potential for Sustainable and Transformation Plans in integrating care for local populations. Further sessions focus on public health initiatives – such as the Government’s childhood obesity strategy and the introduction of the levy on the soft drinks industry from 2018, as well as progress on increasing the provision of high quality mental health care for children and young people, as outlined in NHS England’s Business Plan for 2016/17.

At this early stage, Eustace de Sousa, National Lead, Children, Young People and Families, Public Health England; Tim Atkin, Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Chair of Faculty for Children, Young people and their Families, Division of Clinical Psychology, British Psychological Society; Dr Chad Hockey, GP, Hammersmith and Fulham GP Federation; Matthew Hopkinson, Lead for Mental Health and Bullying, Department for Education; Toby Hyde, Head of Strategy, NHS Hammersmith and Fulham Clinical Commissioning Group; Kate Martin, Director, Common Room Consulting; Professor Neena Modi, President, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and Professor of Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College London; Dr Claire Lemer, Deputy Programme Director, Children and Young People’s Health Partnership and Consultant in General Paediatrics and Service Transformation, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust; Richard Stewart, Chair of the Children’s Surgical Forum, Royal College of Surgeons and Consultant Paediatric Surgeon, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham and Dr Sonia Saxena, Clinical Reader in Primary Care, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London have also agreed to speak. Earl of Listowel, Vice-Chair, All‐Party Parliamentary Group for Looked After Children and Care Leavers and Helen Whately MP, Member, Health Select Committee and Co-Chair, All-Party Parliamentary Health Group have kindly agreed to chair this seminar.

Link for more info: http://www.westminsterforumprojects.co.uk/forums/event.php?eid=1369&t=1869

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PhD studentship: Children with Learning Disabilities as Digital Audiences (Univ. of Glasgow, UK)

AHRC funded PhD studentship at the University of Glasgow in collaboration with BBC Scotland: “Children with Learning Disabilities as Digital Audiences”

Applications are invited for a full PhD studentship in Film and Television Studies at the University of Glasgow to work in collaboration with the Children’s Department at BBC Scotland. The aim of the project is to explore the provision and design of digital media by the BBC for older children with learning disabilities. This exciting opportunity will require the researcher to divide his or her time between the University of Glasgow and the Children’s Department within BBC Scotland (situated in the Pacific Quay in Glasgow). The student will have unique access to the Children’s Department, working amongst BBC staff to capture a sense of the existing provision of digital content for children with learning disabilities and the ways in which BBC Scotland engage with this audience. The project will then continue through a small scale qualitative study that will capture how, why and when digital media is used, interpreted and enjoyed by members of this specific audience. The student will then return to the BBC with their research findings and work alongside colleagues to develop a ‘pitch’ for the design or redesign of digital content that will allow the BBC to respond directly to the needs and desires of their targeted audience.

The specific question this project poses is how we might re-imagine content for differently-abled audiences that is appropriate to both their cognitive abilities and their personal/social needs and desires. (Aims and Objectives are posted below)

A supervisory team from across both institutions will oversee this work and full research training (including audience research skills if required) will be offered. The team will include Dr. Amy Holdsworth and Professor Karen Lury from the University of Glasgow and Ms. Sara Harkins (Head of Children’s BBC Scotland) with relevant support from professional colleagues within BBC Scotland.

he studentship is funded for three years to commence in October 2016 and covers tuition fees at the Home/EU rate. Home students and EU students who have lived in the UK for 3 years prior to the award will also receive a maintenance bursary (stipend) of approx. £14,296 for 16-17 plus an additional £550 travel allowance. In addition, the student is eligible to receive up to £1,000 a year from the BBC to support travel or other expenses directly related to the doctoral research, and will be given use of a desk and computer at the University of Glasgow and appropriate access and resources at the BBC. All AHRC Collaborative PhD students automatically become part of the UK-wide Collaborative Doctoral Partnership development scheme which will provide training in a range of skills needed for research within museums, archives, galleries and heritage organisations.

Informal enquiries are welcome.

Please write to Dr. Amy Holdsworth (Amy.Holdsworth@glasgow.ac.uk ) in the first instance.

Candidates ideally should have:

  • A good 2.1 Honours (or B.A.) degree in a relevant Arts or Social Science discipline.
  • A Masters degree in a related discipline or appropriate professional experience within children’s media, digital media, audience development, working with children and young people with disabilities.
  • A good understanding of contemporary Children’s Television, digital media and issues and debates within disability studies
  • An interest in, or first-hand knowledge of, audience research. • Applicants should be able to demonstrate strong research capabilities and be fluent in spoken and written English.

Applications should include: • A statement of no more than 1,000 words indicating what skills and experience you have that will be relevant for the project. • A current CV • Degree transcripts (this may be an interim transcript if you are still studying) • An example of writing – e.g. academic essay, professional report – up to 3000 words in length • 2 academic/professional references (these may be sent directly from your referees if they would prefer)

Applications to be sent to Jeanette.Berrie@glasgow.ac.uk (Research Administrator, School of Culture and Creative Arts, University of Glasgow) with the subject line BBC CDA.

Closing Date: Wednesday 15th June 2016

Interviewees will be notified by Thursday 23rd June and interviews will take place at the University of Glasgow on Friday 1st July 2016.

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The Project: Through initial audience development work, colleagues at BBC Scotland have already observed the ways in which digital content designed for a young (‘pre-school’) audience is being used by older children with learning disabilities. They have recognized that while these young people may have less sophisticated ‘operational’ abilities their desire and interest in age appropriate content is not necessarily affected. In simple terms, games or interactive challenges aimed at 4-7year olds may represent an appropriate operational challenge (how to work the game, how to move about and between different parts of the page) but are inappropriate in terms of content (older children and young people are more likely to respond positively to content such as WolfBlood rather than In the Night Garden or ‘Mr. Tumble’). The project will therefore focus on this particular issue and ask how we might re-imagine content for differently-abled audiences that is appropriate to their cognitive abilities and their personal/social needs and desires.

 Aims and objectives.

The aims and objectives of this collaborative project are designed to both reflect upon and develop the BBC’s relationship with its differently abled child audience.

Aims

  1. To explore the provision of content for children with learning disabilities: Initial stages of the research will explore the existing provision of digital content for children with learning disabilities and the ways in the children’s department at BBC Scotland engage with this audience (through audience development initiatives, for example). This initial ‘snapshot’ accompanied by critical investigation of academic literature on children, disability and media will form a building block for the student to design and implement a qualitative audience study.
  2. To conduct a small-scale qualitative audience study of children with learning disabilities as digital audiences/users: Utilizing the appropriate methodologies (see below) the student will capture how, why and when digital media is used, interpreted and enjoyed by children with learning disabilities. This fieldwork will importantly also offer the child the opportunity to reflect upon and discuss their use of digital media (e.g. their preferences, desires, likes and dislikes).

Objectives

  1. The student will disseminate research findings through traditional academic outputs and through partnership with the BBC: One of the principle objectives of the project is for the research to have an avenue of dissemination within the BBC to allow the institution to reflect upon and develop their own practices and forms of audience engagement. The links with BBC Scotland and its contacts present opportunities for the research to be accessed by other stakeholder communities and organisations (such as ‘for Scotland’s Disabled Children’ (fSDC)).
  2. To implement research findings through the production of a BBC ‘pitch’: Through the student’s involvement at BBC Scotland he or she will utilise their research on this specific child audience in the development, design or redesign of games, applications or website provision for this audience.
adult care, Children, Familes and Young People, health, mental health, public health, wellbeing

Seminar: Improving children and young people’s health outcomes (Feb 2016: London, UK)

Improving children and young people’s health outcomes: Integration, public health and policy priorities 

Date: Tuesday, 2nd February 2016
Where: Central London
This event is CPD certified

Guest of Honour: Dr Jacqueline Cornish, National Clinical Director for Children, Young People and Transition to Adulthood, NHS England

This seminar will be a timely opportunity to assess priorities for children’s health and wellbeing for the new Parliament. Delegates will consider next steps for improving service delivery for children and young people, and the role of NHS England, Clinical Commissioning Groups and local authorities in promoting positive wellbeing. There will also be discussion on the early impact of new funding for child and adolescent mental health services, and progress made by Public Health England in ensuring every child has the best start in life as one of seven priorities outlined in their five year strategy. Further sessions focus on tackling inequalities, managing the transition to adult care, and challenges for translating research into practice.

We are delighted to include at this seminar keynote addresses from Dr Jacqueline Cornish, National Clinical Director for Children, Young People and Transition to Adulthood, NHS England; Dr Cheryll Adams, Founding Director, Institute of Health Visiting; Professor Dame Sue Bailey, Chair, Children and Young People’s Mental Health Coalition and Chair, Academy of Medical Royal Colleges; Dr Hilary Cass, Senior Clinical Advisor for Children and Young People, Health Education England; Dr David James, Chair, Trainees’ Committee, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and Wendy Nicholson, Lead Nurse for Children, Young People and Families, Public Health England. James Cashmore, Director, Food for Life Partnership; Anna Feuchtwang, Chief Executive Officer, National Children’s Bureau; Emily Fox, Founder, The Albatross Connection; Joe Hayman, Chief Executive, PSHE Association; Louise Taylor, Associate Headteacher, The Compton School, London; Dr Vimal Tiwari, Child Safeguarding Lead, Royal College of General Practitioners and a senior representative from the Greater London Authority have also agreed to speak.

Sir Oliver Heald MP and Earl of Listowel, Treasurer, All-Party Parliamentary Group for Children have kindly agreed to chair this seminar.

A link to the live agenda can be found here.

DRF News

Special Issue on ‘Disability and Television’ out now!!

This month the Journal of Popular Television is publishing an exciting special issue on ‘disability and television’ edited by Rebecca Mallett (Sheffield Hallam University) and Brett Mills (University of East Anglia).

More info can be found here: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-issue,id=2916/

Articles include:

  • Something special: Care, pre-school television and the dis/abled child ~ Amy Holdsworth
  • ‘It’s really scared of disability’: Disabled comedians’ perspectives of the British television comedy industry ~ Sharon Lockyer
  • From awww to awe factor: UK audience meaning-making of the 2012 Paralympics as mediated spectacle ~ Caroline E. M. Hodges,  Richard Scullion and  Daniel Jackson
  • Supersize vs. Superskinny: (Re)framing the freak show in contemporary popular culture ~ Allison Leadley
  • In their words: How television and visual media can raise awareness of dementia and other health conditions that carry stigma, including disabilities ~ Michelle Heward, James Palfreman-Kay and  Anthea Innes
  • Disability in television crime drama: Transgression and access ~ Katie Ellis

Reflection Pieces include:

  • Disability and television: Notes from the field ~ Sarah Barton
  • A ‘surprising and mature portrait’? Reflecting on representations of mental illness in Rookie Blue ~  Shane Brown
  • Is New Zealand ready for more diversity on-screen? ~ Philip Patston and  Barbara Pike

Enjoy 🙂

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Seminar: ‘Great Expectations’ – Child Youth & Family Disability Research Network – South West & Wales

This event (held in Cardiff) will focus on the ‘Lost voices’ of children and youth with disabilites. There will be opportunities to network with other interested people to explore ‘Great Expectations’ for disabled children and youth and listen to 2 speakers who will present their research:

Dr Aaron Prtichard from Bangor University: ‘Lost Voices? Young People with Palliative Care Needs’

Dr Kirsty Liddiard from the University of Sheffield and the Sexuality Working Alliance Group (Open University and Together for Short Lives)’:“I need privacy and respect for privacy as a sexual person”: Young People’s Voices, Sex/uality and the Palliative Care Context.

More information: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/great-expectationschild-youthfamily-disability-research-network-sw-wal-tickets-15045553656?utm_campaign=new_event_email&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb_email&utm_term=eventurl_text

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Reminder: Next DRF Seminar – Weds. 10th December 2014: 10am-12pm

Details for the next DRF seminar are below. All welcome. And if you’d like to present at an upcoming seminar, please do let us know – available slots can be seen here.

Wednesday 10th December, 10am-12pm, Room 100009 (Arundel Building, Sheffield Hallam University)

Slot 1: Joanna Baker-Rogers: Asperger Syndrome – experiencing the phenomenon of friendship (Sheffield Hallam University, UK)

Abstract: As the mother of a son with the label of Asperger Syndrome (AS), I have observed my son enjoying friendships with peers both on the autism spectrum and non-disabled. These observations would appear to challenge the diagnostic view that persons with AS do not enjoy friendship. Instead they prefer solitary activities and being alone. This conceptualisation of the autism spectrum embodies the medical model of disability and in-particular the Triad of Impairments (Wing 1995). The literature is dominated by understandings of friendship of non-disabled people (O’Dell, Bertildotter Rosqvist and Brownlow (2013). There is little consideration of potential autistic friendships from a social model of disability perspective. Instead the focus is on the failure of persons with AS to aspire to and maintain friendships with the aim of improving themselves to experience friendship from a non-disabled perspective.  I have come to question whether concepts of friendship are being imposed upon persons with AS that have little meaning for them, are disabling and embody the concepts of normalcy (Abberley 1991) and ableism (Campbell 2012).

The medical model of disability view of persons with AS not being interested in friendship needs to be problematised. This presentation of my research critiques these misconceptions that have emerged as a result of social barriers in society. My research aims to capture the different and valid lived experience of friendship for persons with AS that challenges the conceptualisation of the autism spectrum as a tragedy for the individual and their family.

Slot 2: Chris Hill: Special School Sporting Experiences: Listening to Student Researchers Labelled with Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties (Sheffield Hallam University, UK)

Abstract: TBC.

DRF News

CFP: 10th International Conference on Child and Adolescent Psychopathology

10th International Conference on Child and Adolescent Psychopathology

Start Date: 20 July 2015 – End Date: 22 July 2015

Venue: Whitelands College, University of Roehampton, London, UK

The goal of this interdisciplinary conference is to present and discuss the state-of-the-art information on various aspects of Child and Adolescent Psychopathology. The conference will be of interest to those who are doing research with young people and to those working within child and adolescent mental health, education, social work and youth justice systems.

Keynote Speakers:

Dr Graeme Fairchild (University of Southampton): “Using a family design to study risk and resilience factors in the aetiology of Conduct Disorder”

Dr Eamon McCrory (University College London): “Biological embedding: How childhood maltreatment gets under the skin”

Dr Alice Gregory (Goldsmiths College, University of London): “The genetics of sleep disorders”

Dr Paul G Ramchandani (Imperial College London): “Getting in early to prevent mental health problems in children”

Dr Luci Wiggs (Oxford Brookes University): “Management of sleep disturbance in young people”

Prof Cecilia A Essau (University of Roehampton): “Mental health problems across cultures: Implications for intervention”

Call for Papers and Research Symposia

Abstracts for oral and poster presentations are warmly invited on any of the following themes:

(1) Assessment, prevention, and treatment of child and adolescent psychopathology;

(2) General issues (risk and protective factors, use of mental health services, different approaches to mental health services delivery);

(3) Cross cultural issues in child and adolescent psychopathology.

 

Abstract Submission Deadline: 15th May 2015

 

More Information: To find out more about the conference and to submit your abstract and register for the conference, please go to

http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/Research-Centres/Centre-for-Applied-Research-and-Assessment-in-Child-and-Adolescent-Wellbeing/Child-and-Adolescent-Psychopathology-Conference/

or contact: Professor Cecilia A. Essau

Department of Psychology, University of Roehampton, Whitelands College, Holybourne Avenue, London SW15 4JD, UK

Email: C.Essau@roehampton.ac.uk

Tel: +44 (0) 20 8392 3647

Fax: +44 (0) 20 8392 3527

DRF News

Job Opp: Professor/Reader in Education (Sheffield, UK)

Fancy being a Professor/Reader in Education (in the Sheffield Institute of Education, Faculty of Development and Society, Sheffield Hallam University, UK)

  • Professor – £Competitive + benefits
  • Reader – £47,787 to £55,375 + benefits

Established in 2013 and already amongst the largest providers of teacher training in the UK, the Sheffield Institute of Education (SIoE) is home to over 5,000 undergraduate and postgraduate students and more than 160 dedicated staff. Our high impact research spans education from the early years of life into adulthood and we have plans in place to grow our profile even further.

As Professor/Reader in Education, you’ll be a key figurehead at the University, with a crucial contribution to make to the research leadership group within the Sheffield Institute of Education. Here, your challenge will be to provide both academic and strategic direction for research across some of our most pressing areas, such as education policy and curriculum and pedagogy in education.  [The Institute also houses a wide-range of fascinating and innovative work on inclusion, disability and autism.]

Applying your exceptional vision, creativity and leadership skills where they matter most, this is an opportunity to continue your track record of enhancing the quality of research, maximising its impact on a global scale, and growing an existing portfolio of high profile research funding.

Enjoying real breadth and potential, we’re looking for an inspirational leader with a passion for education and the power it has to engender positive social change. With a strong research profile behind you, it’s also important that you can demonstrate an ability to influence and develop both colleagues and students. Able to see the bigger picture as well as the detail, your success will shine through the strategic development of our research programmes.

Join us at this exciting time in our development and we will go above and beyond to encourage and support your original ideas and professional ambitions.

To learn more or apply visit www.shu.ac.uk/jobs

Closing date: 17 April 2014.

Also click here.

DRF News

CFP: CAMHS 2014 Conference (Children and Young People’s Mental Health) – Northampton, UK: July, 2014

Event:  CAMHS 2014 Conference (Children and Young People’s Mental Health)

Theme: Learning from the Past, Looking to the Future

Date: 2-4 July 2014

Venue: Park Campus, University of Northampton, UK 

First call for papers: Following on from the successful 2013 Child and Adolescent Mental Health, this 3 day conference aims to provide a space in which professionals and academics can explore research, theory and practice in child and adolescent mental health. It is an opportunity to reflect on and critique established research, policy and practice, to share and celebrate what works, and to explore solutions to the challenges of the future.

Papers, posters, workshops, symposia and other contributions are invited that engage the conference theme. Some suggestions of possible focuses include:

  • Promoting mental health
  • Critical perspectives in children’s mental health
  • Widening access to CAMH services
  • Social relationships, mental health and wellbeing
  • Cultural issues in CAMHS
  • Innovations in CAMHS
  • Outcomes monitoring
  • Mental Health policy
  • Gender and sexualities
  • Working with families
  • Mental health in schools
  • • Early Interventions and many more

Keynote Speakers

Kathryn Pugh: Kathryn is the Programme Lead for Children and Young People’s IAPT. She has managed the programme since its inception in January 2011.  Her first job in the NHS was in primary care, moving to commissioning primary, secondary and specialist care in both acute and mental health. She joined YoungMinds to run SOS project for 16-25s and became Head of Policy and Innovation, leading for the Mental Health Alliance and Children’s Charities on lobbying to change the Mental Health Act to reflect the needs of children and young people, including amendments to prevent inappropriate admission of under 18s to adult mental health wards.

Kathryn joined the National CAMHS Support Service as a CAMHS Regional Development Worker in London and simultaneously worked for first NIMHE then NMHDU as National Lead for the Children and Young People’s Programme implementing the MHA 2007, then ran the joint NCSS NMHDU MH Transitions programme.

Professor Peter Fonagy, PhD, FBA, OBE: Peter is National Clinical Lead of Children and Young People’s Improving Access to Psychological Therapies and Director of UCL Partners’ Mental Health and Well-Being Programme.

Professor Peter Smith: Peter is Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Unit for School and Family Studies at Goldsmiths College, University of London. His research interests include social development in the home and school; play; aggression and bullying in childhood; cyberbullying; and the similarities and differences between bullying in western countries, Japan, and South Korea.

Dr Katherine Runswick-Cole: Katherine is a Senior Research Fellow in Disability Studies and Psychology, at Manchester Metropolitan University. Katherine’s research has mainly focused on the lives of disabled children and their families and draws on a critical disability studies perspective.

Professor Arlene Vetere: Arlene is professor of family therapy and systemic practice at Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, Norway, and affiliate professor of family studies, in the department of family studies, Malta University.  Arlene retired from her post as professor of clinical psychology at Surrey University in December, 2013 in order to spend more time writing. Her latest book is edited with Miochael Tarren-Sweeney, The Mental Health Needs of Vulnerable Children, published by Routledge, 2014. She has co-written ‘Systemic Therapy and Attachment Narratives’ with Rudi Dallos, 2009, Routledge.

Peter Stratton: Peter is Emeritus Professor of Family Therapy at the Leeds Family Therapy & Research Centre.

Submission for the First Call for Papers are invited. The closing date for the first call is 16 March 2014. You are welcome to submit either individual papers, symposia, or workshop proposals, as well as abstracts for posters. Please complete the abstract submission form.

Authors submitting their abstract for the first call for papers should expect a response from the panel by no later than 11 April 2014. This will enable them to take advantage of the Early Bird registration for the conference.

Second call for papers: The deadline for the second call for papers is 12 May 2014

Information regarding registration can be found here.

Please note that, as with all academic conferences, it is expected that speakers register for at least the day on which they are presenting. This facilitates shared learning, which is a key aim of the conference.

Contact us: please email: camhs@northampton.ac.uk

DRF News

Event: ‘Listening to dis/abled children in research’ w/Katherine Runswick-Cole (Feb 2014: SHU, UK)

Date: Thursday February 20th 2014

Venue: Stoddart Building, Room 7330 http://www.shu.ac.uk/university/visit/find-us/plancity.html. at Sheffield Hallam University, UK.  

Time: Refreshments will be available from 4.00pm and the seminar will begin at 4.30pm. Latest end time will be 6.30pm.

The Equality, Diversity and Social Justice Research group presents a seminar by Dr. Katherine Runswick-Cole (Manchester Metropolitan University, UK)

Title: Listening to dis/abled children in research: Thinking about policy and practice

Abstract: Listening to the voice of the child has long been a key concern of practitioners, policy makers and researchers.  And yet, children and young people continue to report that they are not being listened to when important decisions are made about their lives (HMSO, 2013).  These challenges are often magnified in the lives of disabled children whose lives are often pushed to the margins as they are excluded from the category of children ‘able’ to give their views (Curran and Runswick-Cole, 2013).  In this presentation, I will reflect on the joys and challenges of listening to children’s views in the research process.  The paper draws on examples from two recently completed research projects (Does Every Child Matter, post-Blair?  The interconnections of disabled childhoods, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, 2008 – 2011; Resilience in the lives of disabled people across the life course, funded by Scope, 2011-2013) as well as from two books (Currran & Runswick-Cole, 2013; Mallett and Runswick-Cole, 2014) in order to consider how a dialogue between research, policy and practice might open up opportunities for listening to children.

References

  • Curran, T. and Runswick-Cole, K. (2013) Disabled Children’s Childhood Studies: critical perspectives in a global context, London: Palgrave MacMillan.
  • HMSO (2013) Children and Families Bill, London: HMSO.
  • Mallett, R. and Runswick-Cole, K. (2014) Approaching Disability: critical issues and perspectives, Abingdon: Routledge.

Katherine is Senior Research Fellow in Disability Studies and Psychology at the Research Institute for Health and Social Change at Manchester Metropolitan University  http://www.rihsc.mmu.ac.uk/staff/profile.php?surname=Runswick-Cole&name=Katherine

Attendance is FREE! but space will be limited so if intending to come please email Ian Chesters at i.chesters@shu.ac.uk