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Event: Other Psychotherapies – Across Time, Space, and Cultures (April, 2017: Glasgow, UK)

Event: Other Psychotherapies – Across Time, Space, and Cultures

Date: Monday 3rd – Tuesday 4th April 2017

Location: Wolfson Medical Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LQ (UK)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Dr Claudia Lang, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich: ‘Theory and practice in Ayurvedic psychotherapy’
  • Dr Chiara Thumiger, Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick: ‘Therapies of the word in ancient medicine’
  • Dr Elizabeth Roxburgh, Psychology, University of Northampton: ‘Anomalous experiences and mental health’
  • Dr Jennifer Lea, Geography, University of Exeter: ‘Building “A Mindful Nation”? The use of mindfulness meditation in educational, health and criminal justice settings’

The Wellcome Trust-funded conference ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’ brings contemporary Western expertise into dialogue with psychotherapeutic approaches from ‘other’ spatially, historically or otherwise ‘distant’ cultures. Having confirmed the programme of speakers for the event, we are delighted to announce that general registration is now open.

Registration: Registration costs £40 for general admittance, and £15 for students/service users. Ticket price includes attendance at the conference on 3rd-4th April 2017, including lunch and refreshments on both days, and a buffet dinner on Mon 3rd April.

  • To register, and to see our full programme of speakers, please visit our Eventbrite page.

Please email the organisers at arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk if you have any queries.

Organising Committee:

  • Dr Gavin Miller (Chair), Medical Humanities Research Centre/English Literature, University of Glasgow
  • Dr Sofia Xenofontos, Classics, University of Glasgow
  • Dr Cheryl McGeachan, Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow
  • Dr Ross White, Psychological Sciences, University of Liverpool
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CFP: ‘Autism Narratives’ Special Issue of Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

Journal: Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

Call for Papers for Special Issue: Autism Narratives

Guest Editors: Stuart Murray (English, University of Leeds) & Mark Osteen (English, Loyola University Maryland)

2018 will mark the 10th anniversary of the publication of two major studies on the cultural representations of autism, Stuart Murray’s monograph Representing Autism: Culture, Narrative, Fascination and Mark Osteen’s edited collection Autism and Representation. In the intervening years, autism representation has proliferated across media and been re-configured diagnostically in the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-V. This special issue asks: what current topics shape the cultural conversations around autism? Has the greater profile of the condition over the last ten years led to improvements in the ways it is discussed and greater sophistication in its representations? Have increases in cross-and multi-disciplinary academic work produced more nuanced accounts of autism experiences? Where does the condition fit in recent developments in Disability Studies? In short, do we now know better what is meant by an ‘autism narrative’?

Possible topics include (but are not limited to):

  • – Autism in fiction, film, and life-narratives
  • – Autism and the visual arts
  • – Music and autism
  • – DSM-V and changes in autism diagnosis; the ‘disappearance’ of Asperger’s syndrome
  • – Autism and popular media
  • – Theorising autism
  • – Medical discourses of autism
  • – Autism and social communities
  • – Autism and technology
  • – Autism and inter/dependence and care
  • – Autism and cultural, ethnic and racial diversity

Please email a one-page proposal to s.f.murray@leeds.ac.uk and mosteen@loyola.edu by February 28, 2017. Contributors can expect to be selected and notified by March 31, 2017. (Full drafts of the selected articles will be due on December 15, 2017). Please direct any questions to either guest editor. We welcome contributions from autistic/neuro-atypical persons.

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Now Booking: Disability Studies Student Society Symposium (Liverpool Hope University, UK: June, 2016)

The Disability Studies student society symposium at Liverpool Hope University hopes to bring together students across the North-West to share, discuss and advise on research methodologies in disability studies. The symposium is open to students, both undergraduate and postgraduate, to explore a range of innovative and creative methodologies within the growing field of disability studies.

This is a free event, however for catering purposes please confirm your attendance via the registration form which can be found here.

We invite submissions of abstracts of up to 300 words for paper presentations that detail methodological approaches to research projects, both those that have been completed and those that are currently underway.

The student symposium will be held at Liverpool Hope University on Wednesday 22nd June 2016. A full schedule for the symposium will be updated and available shortly as will be details for registration.

Abstracts of up to 300 words should be submitted for consideration by 29th April 2016 to12000935@hope.ac.uk Presenters will be informed via email by 22nd May 2016.

For more information please follow this link https://studentsymposiumliverpoolhope.wordpress.com/

disability, disability research, Uncategorized

Disability Studies Student Society Symposium (Liverpool Hope University, UK: June, 2016)

The Disability Studies Student Society Symposium at Liverpool Hope University hopes to bring together students across the North-West (and beyond) to share, discuss and advise on research methodologies in disability studies.

We invite submissions of abstracts of up to 300 words for paper presentations that detail methodological approaches to research projects, both those that have been completed and those that are currently underway. We are not expecting polished papers, rather we want to create a safe and open space to share ideas, concerns and questions.

The symposium is open to students, both undergraduate and postgraduate. We are interested in hearing about a range of innovative and creative methodologies within the growing field of disability studies.

The student symposium will be held at Liverpool Hope University on Wednesday 22nd June 2016. A full schedule for the symposium will be updated and available shortly as will be details for registration.

Abstracts of up to 300 words should be submitted for consideration by 22nd April 2016 to 12000935@hope.ac.uk. Presenters will be informed via email by 22nd May 2016.

For more information regarding submission, or general information concerning the symposium please contact: Leah Burch – Email: 12000935@hope.ac.uk

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CFP: ‘Dissecting the Page: Medical Paratexts, Medieval to Modern’ edited collection

From Christina Lee and Freya Harrison’s discovery of the MRSA-combatting properties of an Anglo-Saxon recipe, to the increasing popularity of Ian Williams’ Graphic Medicine as a teaching tool for medical students, current research into the intersections between medicine, text, and image is producing dynamic and unexpected results (Thorpe: 2015; Lee and Harrison: 2015; Taavitsainen: 2010; Couser: 2009; Cioffi: 2009; Díaz-Vera: 2009). Recent years have seen conferences on paratextual research, and a range of events orientated around literature and medicine. The purpose of this edited collection is to open up wider scholarship into medical paratexts, spanning pragmatics, literary studies, and the medical humanities.

We propose that the breadth of research into medical book history in the medieval and early-modern period will prompt productive and innovative overlaps with work on modern medical paratexts. We understand paratext as the apparatus of graphic communication: title pages, prefaces, illustrations, marginalia, and publishing details which act as mediators between text and reader. Discussing the development of medical paratexts across scribal, print and digital media, from the medieval period to the twenty-first century, the collection will be provisionally structured in three chronological sections: Anglo-Saxon and Medieval, Early Modern, and Modern periods.

We are now looking for academics, artists, and medical professionals to submit abstracts on topics pertaining to medical paratexts. We invite proposals on topics that include (but are not limited to):

• the role of the medical preface
• graphic medicine in popular culture
• medicine, illness, and/or disability and graphic novels
• the development and role of medical (and medicalised) illustrations
• the advertising and placement of texts depicting medicine/illness/disability
• the development of paratext in medical texts from script to print
• the use and readers of medical texts
• auto/biography and medicine
• online medical writing, publishing, and paratexts

We have received initial interest from Palgrave Macmillan about the proposal, and intend to submit a full proposal for a Palgrave Pivot edited collection of approximately 40,000 words. Key benefits of the Pivot model include publication within three months of acceptance of final manuscripts, flexible length, peer review, and availability in e-book and hardback formats.

• The provisional timeline for the collection is as follows:
• January: deadline for abstracts (500-700 words)
• May: first drafts of articles submitted to editors (4000-4500 word chapters)
• June: article drafts returned with comments
• August: final proofs submitted to Palgrave
• December: publication of edited collection.

Please email an abstract of 500-700 words and a short bio to the conference organisers (Dr Hannah Tweed and Dr Diane Scott) at medicalparatexts@gmail.com by Sunday 10th January 2016. We will respond with decisions on chapters by the end of January 2016.

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CFP: Disability and Shakespearean Theatre Symposium

Where?: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, Lilybank Gardens, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ

When?: 9.45am-5pm, Wednesday 20th April 2016

Attendance fee?: £25 full, £15 concession, free for BSA members

What?:  This symposium draws together growing research interest in disability studies and Shakespearean theatre. In discussing the depiction, treatment, and uses of disability in Shakespeare’s work (and that of his contemporaries) alongside analysis of the role of disability in staging of his plays, we hope to encourage interaction between creative practitioners, historians, and literary scholars. Playwright and disability studies scholar Prof. Chris Mounsey (University of Winchester) will give the keynote address on “VariAbility in Shakespeare”, in which he will explore alternative ways of responding to the question of the existence of disability in the Early Modern period, and to one of Shakespeare’s most infamous characters: Richard III. Following the symposium, Glasgow-based playwright Molly Ziegler (Notes, Getting it (Back)) has agreed to premier her new play, Let Her Come In. Let Her Come In is a one act rewriting of Hamlet, focused on mental illness, gender, and disability.

We are now looking for academics, actors, and creative practitioners of all levels, periods, and fields to submit proposals for 20 minute conference papers, or 5-10 minute position papers for discussion. We invite papers on topics that include (but are not limited to):

  • Disability in contemporary adaptations of Shakespeare
  • 21st-century understanding of (and challenges to) disability on the Shakespearean stage
  • VariAbility and categorisations of disability on stage (especially as applied to mental and physical disabilities)
  • Staging disability (actors, prostheses, costumes, etc.)
  • Disabled actors and staging Shakespeare
  • Signed Shakespeare, captioning, and assistive technologies
  • Disabled scholars’ experience of Shakespeare in performance and the academy
  • Cultural and historical concepts of disability in Shakespearean texts
  • The language of disability in Shakespeare
  • Challenging the idea of Shakespeare as savant
  • Disability and Shakespeare’s collaborators and contemporaries
  • Disability studies theory and Shakespearean theatre

Further Details?: Please email an abstract of up to 300 words and a short bio to the symposium organisers (disabilityandshakespeare@gmail.com) by Friday 15th January 2016. Please indicate if your proposal is for a position paper. There are two small travel bursaries available for postgraduate/early career presenters; the recipients of these grants will be asked to write a short reflection on the symposium, which will be published on the BSA website, the Glasgow Medical Humanities Research Centre blog, and the symposium website.

If you wish to be considered for one of the postgraduate bursaries, please email us for an application form and submit it with your abstract and bio. We will contact all respondents on the outcome of their proposal by Friday 22nd January 2016. Thanks to funding from the British Shakespeare Association, this symposium will be free to attend for BSA members. Symposium attendees are welcome to join the BSA in advance of the event or on the day.

The symposium venue, the Sir Alwyn Williams Building, is fully accessible, and the symposium will include accommodations such as pre-circulated papers and discussion topics, ending with an interactive roundtable discussion. For more information on access, transport, and the venue please visit our website. If you have any questions, please email the symposium team at disabilityandshakespeare@gmail.com, or contact us via @Disability&SS.

DRF News

CFP: Disability and Impairment: a Technological Fix? (Nov. 2015: UK)

Event Title: Disability and Impairment: a Technological Fix?

Date: 27th November 2015

Location: London Metropolitan Archives, 40 Northampton Road, London, EC1R 0HB

Part of Disability History Month and supported by the King’s Fund, this conference will feature a range of speakers including community groups, heritage organisations and academics.

CALL FOR PAPERS

Papers are invited from across the heritage, cultural, academic and grassroots communities. Our aim is to generate a dialogue between these groups through a programme of presentations and shorts talks discussing the theme of technological change and the portrayal of disability then and now.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Assistive technology– the changing ways in which technology has been seen to act as an equaliser and a ‘fix’ for disability
  • Medical technology– the ways in which new medical technology has affected concepts of what is “normal”
  • A revolution?– comparisons of the portrayal of disability in the information age with agricultural and industrial societies.

We invite short abstracts of between 50 and 200 words for informal 10 minute presentations that share work-in- progress or provide an introduction to new projects or research that address these themes.  We also invite abstracts for 20 minute papers or presentations exploring them themes in more detail.

This conference is being delivered on a not for profit basis and the organisers are unable to cover speakers costs except in cases where speakers would otherwise be prevented from attending for financial reasons.

Abstract deadline: 1 October 2015

Abstracts to: tom.furber@cityoflondon.gov,uk

DRF News

Special Issue on ‘Disability and Television’ out now!!

This month the Journal of Popular Television is publishing an exciting special issue on ‘disability and television’ edited by Rebecca Mallett (Sheffield Hallam University) and Brett Mills (University of East Anglia).

More info can be found here: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-issue,id=2916/

Articles include:

  • Something special: Care, pre-school television and the dis/abled child ~ Amy Holdsworth
  • ‘It’s really scared of disability’: Disabled comedians’ perspectives of the British television comedy industry ~ Sharon Lockyer
  • From awww to awe factor: UK audience meaning-making of the 2012 Paralympics as mediated spectacle ~ Caroline E. M. Hodges,  Richard Scullion and  Daniel Jackson
  • Supersize vs. Superskinny: (Re)framing the freak show in contemporary popular culture ~ Allison Leadley
  • In their words: How television and visual media can raise awareness of dementia and other health conditions that carry stigma, including disabilities ~ Michelle Heward, James Palfreman-Kay and  Anthea Innes
  • Disability in television crime drama: Transgression and access ~ Katie Ellis

Reflection Pieces include:

  • Disability and television: Notes from the field ~ Sarah Barton
  • A ‘surprising and mature portrait’? Reflecting on representations of mental illness in Rookie Blue ~  Shane Brown
  • Is New Zealand ready for more diversity on-screen? ~ Philip Patston and  Barbara Pike

Enjoy 🙂

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Reminder: Next DRF Seminar Tues. 10th Feb. 2015

The details for the next DRF seminar are as follows:

Date: Tuesday 10th February, 2-4, Room 10111

Slot 1: Harriet Cameron, University of Sheffield, UK: Dyslexia, Discourse and Higher Education

Under UK law dyslexia is a disability and the label entitles students within higher education to certain supports. However, students with the label I have come across during my work as a specialist tutor conceptualise dyslexia in different ways.  Some say they feel they are just ‘stupid’, some consider dyslexia a medical condition, some feel that dyslexia is a positive, and others feel they are simply different, part of a neuro-diverse population.  My position is that the ways dyslexia is constructed in any particular interaction, or in any wider text, have implications for how students with the label construct their identities (and others’ identities) as academic learners. In turn, I believe certain ways of being and doing are opened up or closed down by the ‘subject positions’ (Davies & Harre, 2001) these constructions offer. Today I will discuss a discourse analysis of two focus group conversations between dyslexic university students and myself. In this session I will talk about the different subject positions participants took up or offered, the wider discourses they drew upon, and the implications of these for ‘being’ and identity within the higher education context.  While this study has been undertaken in the UK, the implications are relevant to our understandings of learning and identity across the western world where individualistic and meritocratic ideologies pervade educational discourse. In helping students, teachers, and other educational practitioners to become more aware of the discursive production of ‘facts’ like dyslexia, the hope is that they will become better able to critically interrogate their own learning identities and have more awareness of the ways they position themselves and others.

  • Davies,B., and Harre,R. (2001) Positioning: The Discursive Production of Selves. Reading 19 in in Wetherell,M., Taylor,S., Yates,S. (Eds.) (2001) Discourse, Theory and Practice: A Reader. 261-271. London, Thousand Oaks, New Delhi: Sage Publications/ The Open University.  

Slot 2: Teodor Mladenov, Kings College London, UK: Disability in state socialism and postsocialism

 Abstract:  Seminal works in disability studies (Finkelstein, 1980; Oliver, 1990; Stone, 1984) have shown that the analysis of large-scale transformations – such as the one from feudalism to industrial capitalism – is indispensable for understanding and critique of present-day constructions of disability. The transition from state socialism to postsocialist capitalism in Eastern Europe invites similar considerations – the genealogy of disability policy in postsocialist countries necessarily leads back to their socialist past (Philips, 2009). Proceeding from these presumptions, in this presentation I will first outline some political-economic features of state socialism that underpinned its productivism. Productivism will be regarded as a mechanism (‘assemblage’) that reduces humans to resources utilisable for the enhancement of productive output. I will then explore some ways in which productivism has shaped disability policy in the socialist countries of the Eastern Bloc. Finally, I will look at the ways in which this state socialist legacy has influenced present-day disability policy in the postsocialist region. I will welcome reflections on similarities and differences with ‘advanced liberal’ (Rose, 1996) societies such as the UK.

  • Finkelstein, V. (1980) Attitudes and Disabled People: Issues for Discussion. New York: World Rehabilitation Fund.
  •  Oliver, M. (1990) The Politics of Disablement. London: Macmillan.
  •  Phillips, S. D. (2009) ‘“There are no invalids in the USSR!”: A missing Soviet chapter in the new disability history’, Disability Studies Quarterly, Vol. 29, No. 3, n.p.
  •  Rose, N. (1996) ‘Governing “advanced” liberal democracies’, in A. Barry, T. Osborne and N. Rose (eds) Foucault and Political Reason: Liberalism, Neo-Liberalism and Rationalities of Government. London: UCL Press, pp. 37-64.
  • Stone, D. (1984) The Disabled State. London: Macmillan.

Next DRF Seminar: Wednesday 25th March, 1-3, Room 10111 ~ with Kirsty Liddiard (University of Sheffield) and Nick Hodge (Sheffield Hallam University).

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CFP: Special Issue of African American Review, Blackness and Disability

In 2006, the late Christopher M. Bell lamented “the failure of Disability Studies to engage issues of race and ethnicity in a substantive capacity.” In recent years, scholars like Michelle Jarman, Jennifer James, Cynthia Wu, Nirmalla Ervelles, and Terry Rowden have filled this lacuna with essays and books of their own. Though it may no longer be necessary to think in terms of failure, we still have a significant amount of work to do in exploring the scholarly terrain where disability and race intersect. In an effort to continue this conversation, this special issue of <em “mso-bidi-font-style:=”” normal”=””>African American Review seeks essays that probe the connections between blackness and disability and think beyond the idea that one is simply like the other.

We define disability as the existing social, legal, and cultural conditions that make the world un-navegable for people with impairments, drawing a distinction between material realities and the consequences of social (in)action. We recognize the historical relationship between racializing and disabling discourses as complex and dynamic. In this issue, we aim to challenge, expose, and analyze the way these discourses shape literary and cultural production.

Centralizing disability in discussions of blackness revamps our understanding of what blackness was, is, and could be. In terms of history, it asks us to recast Harriet Tubman as mentally disabled (based on her head injury), and by extension the conception of slaves as extremely abled. The use of amputation as a punishment for seeking freedom challenges us to consider that blackness and disability are simultaneously constructed as anti-thetical to freedom itself and dangerous to the nation-state. If we are to think about how black citizens must traverse structural inequality regularly, how might that be complicated by an inability to get inside the actual structures one needs to enter? How might the back and side ramp entrances to government buildings create a permanent but vexed easement into institutions for black disabled folk? In terms of scholarly work, performance studies and cultural studies seek to reimagine the black body as outside the strictures placed upon it, but generally do so in abled terms. In short, I ask a question similar to Gloria Hull, Patricia Bell Scott and Barbara Smith’s inquiry for their collection on black feminism: if all the disabled are white, and all the blacks are abled, what are those of us in the middle? This special issue would be groundbreaking because it asks for nothing less than a retooling of the very terms of blackness and disability. To view the two together is to disrupt and change both.

We welcome essays that examine the wide range of possible literary and cultural texts available though we are most interested in work that explains how discourses of disability and blackness transform each other. Our primary goal is to expand the repertoire of critical approaches to texts (broadly defined) that deal with blackness and disability.

Potential Topics:

Slavery and the Politics of Disability

Memoir/Autobiography

Afrofuturism/Black Speculative Fiction

The Graphic Novel

Disability and Black Queer Culture

Black Disabled Characters in Film & Visual Culture

Differential Politics of Disability (how disability impacts the lives of people of different ethnicities and classes differently)

Disability and the Black Arts

Abstracts of no more than 500 words and a brief CV should be sent to Theri’ Pickens c/o Intellectual.Insurrection@gmail.com by June 30, 2015. The invitation for full papers will be sent out on September 1, 2015 and completed essays will be expected by February 1, 2016.