Uncategorized

Now Booking: Disability Studies Student Society Symposium (Liverpool Hope University, UK: June, 2016)

The Disability Studies student society symposium at Liverpool Hope University hopes to bring together students across the North-West to share, discuss and advise on research methodologies in disability studies. The symposium is open to students, both undergraduate and postgraduate, to explore a range of innovative and creative methodologies within the growing field of disability studies.

This is a free event, however for catering purposes please confirm your attendance via the registration form which can be found here.

We invite submissions of abstracts of up to 300 words for paper presentations that detail methodological approaches to research projects, both those that have been completed and those that are currently underway.

The student symposium will be held at Liverpool Hope University on Wednesday 22nd June 2016. A full schedule for the symposium will be updated and available shortly as will be details for registration.

Abstracts of up to 300 words should be submitted for consideration by 29th April 2016 to12000935@hope.ac.uk Presenters will be informed via email by 22nd May 2016.

For more information please follow this link https://studentsymposiumliverpoolhope.wordpress.com/

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disability, disability research, Uncategorized

Disability Studies Student Society Symposium (Liverpool Hope University, UK: June, 2016)

The Disability Studies Student Society Symposium at Liverpool Hope University hopes to bring together students across the North-West (and beyond) to share, discuss and advise on research methodologies in disability studies.

We invite submissions of abstracts of up to 300 words for paper presentations that detail methodological approaches to research projects, both those that have been completed and those that are currently underway. We are not expecting polished papers, rather we want to create a safe and open space to share ideas, concerns and questions.

The symposium is open to students, both undergraduate and postgraduate. We are interested in hearing about a range of innovative and creative methodologies within the growing field of disability studies.

The student symposium will be held at Liverpool Hope University on Wednesday 22nd June 2016. A full schedule for the symposium will be updated and available shortly as will be details for registration.

Abstracts of up to 300 words should be submitted for consideration by 22nd April 2016 to 12000935@hope.ac.uk. Presenters will be informed via email by 22nd May 2016.

For more information regarding submission, or general information concerning the symposium please contact: Leah Burch – Email: 12000935@hope.ac.uk

DRF News

Pacific Rim International Conference (May, 2015: Hawaii, USA)

from… the organisers of the Pacific Rim International Conference (May, 2015: Hawaii, USA)

 

“For our 31st edition, Pac Rim is merging and partnering with another conference, so there is sure to be plenty of surprises! 

The Pacific Rim International Conference, considered one of the most ‘diverse gatherings’ in the world, encourages and respects voices from “diverse” perspective across numerous areas, including: voices from persons representing all disability areas; experiences of family members and supporters across all disability and diversity areas; responsiveness to diverse cultural and language differences; evidence of researchers and academics studying diversity and disability; stories of persons providing powerful lessons; examples of program providers, and; action plans to meet human and social needs in a globalized world.

In 2015, new topic areas will promote thoughtful discussion and suggest new ways to integrate education, technology, advocacy, activism and interdisciplinary research. We all strive to strengthen communities and enhance the lives of all human beings. Together, we can harness the tremendous synergy generated by the intermingling and cross-fertilization of diverse perspectives, and ‘spread the word’ as we continue our professional and personal life journey.

Take your first steps to the islands by visiting the website: www.pacrim.hawaii.edu.

We welcome your ideas, suggestions and enthusiasm. Then join us in Waikiki, Hawaii, May 18 & 19, 2015.”

 

DRF News

Event: ‘Listening to dis/abled children in research’ w/Katherine Runswick-Cole (Feb 2014: SHU, UK)

Date: Thursday February 20th 2014

Venue: Stoddart Building, Room 7330 http://www.shu.ac.uk/university/visit/find-us/plancity.html. at Sheffield Hallam University, UK.  

Time: Refreshments will be available from 4.00pm and the seminar will begin at 4.30pm. Latest end time will be 6.30pm.

The Equality, Diversity and Social Justice Research group presents a seminar by Dr. Katherine Runswick-Cole (Manchester Metropolitan University, UK)

Title: Listening to dis/abled children in research: Thinking about policy and practice

Abstract: Listening to the voice of the child has long been a key concern of practitioners, policy makers and researchers.  And yet, children and young people continue to report that they are not being listened to when important decisions are made about their lives (HMSO, 2013).  These challenges are often magnified in the lives of disabled children whose lives are often pushed to the margins as they are excluded from the category of children ‘able’ to give their views (Curran and Runswick-Cole, 2013).  In this presentation, I will reflect on the joys and challenges of listening to children’s views in the research process.  The paper draws on examples from two recently completed research projects (Does Every Child Matter, post-Blair?  The interconnections of disabled childhoods, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, 2008 – 2011; Resilience in the lives of disabled people across the life course, funded by Scope, 2011-2013) as well as from two books (Currran & Runswick-Cole, 2013; Mallett and Runswick-Cole, 2014) in order to consider how a dialogue between research, policy and practice might open up opportunities for listening to children.

References

  • Curran, T. and Runswick-Cole, K. (2013) Disabled Children’s Childhood Studies: critical perspectives in a global context, London: Palgrave MacMillan.
  • HMSO (2013) Children and Families Bill, London: HMSO.
  • Mallett, R. and Runswick-Cole, K. (2014) Approaching Disability: critical issues and perspectives, Abingdon: Routledge.

Katherine is Senior Research Fellow in Disability Studies and Psychology at the Research Institute for Health and Social Change at Manchester Metropolitan University  http://www.rihsc.mmu.ac.uk/staff/profile.php?surname=Runswick-Cole&name=Katherine

Attendance is FREE! but space will be limited so if intending to come please email Ian Chesters at i.chesters@shu.ac.uk

DRF News

Disability Studies Postdoctorate Research Associate Position at the University Of Sheffield (UK)

Job Reference Number: UOS007678

Job Title: Post-doctoral Research Associate

Contract Type: Fixed term until 31 December 2016

Faculty: Faculty of Social Sciences

Department: School of Education

Salary: Grade 7

£28,972 – £36,661 per annum

Closing Date: 8th January 2014

 

This Post-doctorate Research Associate will work with Professors Dan Goodley and Elizabeth Wood and other colleagues across the Social Sciences, Humanities and Medicine, to develop a newly identified programme of inter-disciplinary research entitled ‘Transforming Disability, Culture and Childhood: Local, Global and Transdisciplinary Responses’. The successful post-holder will work with a number of academic colleagues in the Centre for the Study of Childhood and Youth to develop the theoretical, research and funding capabilities of a research programme comprised of three research strands:

Strand 1: Early Years (birth-5 years) Disability Diagnoses: Cultural Perspectives, Beliefs and Experiences in the Early Years.

Strand 2: Children (5-16 years) Disability Dealings: Working with Children as Critical Practitioners.

Strand 3: Young People (16 – 24 years) Disability Discourses: Analysing Emotionality and Psychologisation.

 

Applicants should hold a good first degree and a PhD in a relevant discipline (or equivalent) and have experience of undertaking qualitative research and a good track record of publications. Previous experience and skills in inter-disciplinary research is desirable

More Info here.

DRF News

PhD Studentship Opportunities at the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York (UK)

White Rose DTC ESRC Networks promote collaboration across the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York.  The intention is to support interdisciplinary research excellence and develop critical mass in key areas of research with the aim of building long-term research partnerships between the White Rose Universities.

Title of network: Complexity and Disabled Selfhood: An Inter-Disciplinary White Rose Network

 Each studentship is tenable from Session 2014 and will provide Home/EU tuition fees and a maintenance grant paid at standard Research Council rates. It is expected that the student appointed to the project will liaise with both supervisors at least 6 times a year. Applicants for these studentships will be expected to hold a UK Upper Second Class Honours degree or equivalent.

For further information, contact the named supervisor below:

Academic lead
Name: Professor Alan Roulstone
Department/School: Sociology and Social Policy
University: University of Leeds
Tel: 0113 3434434
Email Address: a.roulstone@leeds.ac.uk

STUDENTSHIP ONE – Imagining Work: Disabled Young People, Narratives on the Boundaries of Work and Welfare

Principal Supervisor
Name: Professor Alan Roulstone
Department/School: Sociology and Social Policy
University: University of Leeds
Tel:01133434434
Email: a.roulstone@leeds.ac.uk

Co-Supervisor: Professor Peter Dwyer
Current position: Professor of Social Policy University of York

STUDENTSHIP TWO – Contesting neoliberal education and able citizenship: Some postconventionalist alternatives

Principal Supervisor:
Name: Professor Dan Goodley
Department/School: Education
University: University of Sheffield
Tel: 0114 222 8185
Email: d.goodley@sheffield.ac.uk

Co-supervisor:
Name: Dr Angharad Beckett
Department/School: Sociology and Social Policy
University: University of Leeds
Tel:0113 343 4409
Email: a.e.beckett@leeds.ac.uk

STUDENTSHIP THREE – Overcoming the Barriers: Including People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities in Research

Principal Supervisor:
Name: Prof Celia Kitzinger
Department/School:Sociology
University: York
Tel:07872472740
Email: celia.kitzinger@york.ac.uk

Co-Supervisor: Dr Kathy Boxall
Current position: Lecturer in Social Work

DRF News

Event: ‘Researching Disabled People’s Sexual Lives: Some Reflections’ (3rd Dec 2013: Toronto, Canada)

The New College Disability Studies Speaker Series presents…

Researching Disabled People’s Sexual Lives: Some Reflections

A Lecture by Dr. Kirsty Liddiard (Ethel Louise Armstrong Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Disability Studies, Ryerson University, Canada)

Tuesday, December 3rd 2013 (1pm-3pm)

OISE, 2nd Floor Room 2212, 252 Bloor St. West, Above St. George Subway, Toronto, Canada.

Biography: Kirsty Liddiard is currently the Ethel Louise Armstrong Postdoctoral Fellow within the School of Disability Studies, Ryerson University, Toronto, where she lectures and teaches on a range of disability issues. Kirsty was awarded with a PhD in Sociology in April 2013 from the University of Warwick, UK. Her work critically explores the intersections of disability, gender, and sexuality in dis/ableist cultures.

Description of talk: In this talk, I offer a reflexive account of the processes, politics, problems, practicalities and pleasures of storying disabled people’s sexual lives for the purposes of sociological research. Drawing upon a doctoral study which explored disabled people’s lived experiences of sex, intimacy and sexuality through their own sexual stories, I consider how my identity, subjectivity and embodiment – in this case, a white, British, young, heterosexual, disabled, cisgendered woman with congenital and (dependent upon the context) visible impairment – was interwoven within and through the research methodology; most explicitly, as an interlocutor and co-constructor of informants’ sexual stories. Given the paucity of reflexive research in this area, a number of reflexive dilemmas are identified. These dilemmas make valuable methodological contributions to qualitative sociology, disability studies scholarship and research, and current knowledges of the emotional work of qualitative researchers (Dickinson-Smith et al 2009).

Event information:

  • Light snacks and refreshments will be provided
  • ASL interpretation is booked
  • This building is wheelchair accessible
  • The closest accessible subway station is St. George Subway Station, Bedford Road exit
  •  Although we cannot guarantee an absolute scent free space, we ask attendees to refrain from wearing scents to this event

THIS EVENT IS FREE

For accessibility or additional information, please contact: uoftdisabilitylistserve@gmail.com

 

DRF News

CFP: Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies

Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies

Call For Papers

***SUBMISSION DEADLINE: January 30th, 2014***

The Equity Studies program, New College, University of Toronto, invites submissions for the inaugural edition of Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies. Knots is a peer-reviewed journal that will highlight high-calibre work by undergraduate students  and undergraduate alumni that moves beyond normative biomedical conceptions of disability and contributes to the development and growth of Disability Studies as a field.

The editors are open to the widest array of discussion of relevant themes and topics that contribute to Disability Studies and the continued examination and deconstruction of ableism. Submissions in the forms of essays, book and film reviews, and art pieces are welcome. Suggested themes might include, but are by no means limited to:

  • intersectional analyses of sexuality/gender/class/race & disability
  • crip community, activism, allyship and disability rights;
  • representations, interpretations of disability in everyday life; in arts, athletics, and performance;
  • disability in local and global contexts; interactions in the medical and rehabilitative communities;
  • education; learning and developmental disabilities;
  • physical disability; psychiatric disability; M/madness;
  • eugenics; disability history; disability rights; employment;
  • representations in pop culture; representation and/or expression through the arts; etc.

 

Requirements and Reviewing:  Submissions should be original and unpublished with an emphasis on completed (rather than intended) works. Essays should be 2500 words maximum, excluding bibliography; book and film reviews should be 1000 words maximum; art pieces should be accompanied by an artists’ statement not in excess of 500 words. Manuscripts should be fully and correctly cited in APA style.

Submissions will be evaluated on both significance and relevance to the field of Disability Studies as well as technical strength and clarity, and should be accompanied by a 100-word abstract. Submitted work will be subject to peer-review; successfully reviewed entries will be returned to submitters for edits before being approved for publication. Once the editing period has come to a close, we will not accept any changes to an accepted paper.

 

Submission Procedure & Information:  The submission process is electronic: all manuscript submissions can be made online to knots.contact@gmail.com  by no later than January 30th, 2013. The author/s name and the title of work both should appear in the subject line of the email; the full manuscript should be attached as a PDF file to the editors. Any questions regarding content, submission, or accessibility requests should be directed to co-editor Sarah Hoedlmoser (sarah.hoedlmoser@gmail.com).

DRF News, Publications

CFP: Critical Disability Discourse / Discours Critiques Dans Le Champ Du Handicap

Critical Disability Discourse / Discours Critiques Dans Le Champ Du Handicap

** Call for Papers **

Critical Disability Discourse is a bilingual, interdisciplinary journal, publishing articles that focus on experiences of disability from a critical perspective. It was launched in November 2009 by York University’s Critical Disability Studies Graduate Student Program (www.yorku.ca/gradcdis). The journal considers articles from graduate scholars in a variety of academic fields, but undergraduate students, activists, and community members/organizers are also invited to contribute. Critical Disability Discourse’s goals are to provide emerging scholars with an opportunity to contribute to the expanding field of critical disability studies and to gain exposure for their work in the public sphere.

Next Submission deadline is March 1, 2014.

 

Possible topics can include but are not limited to the following:

  • • Critical theory and disability: feminism, post-modernism, postcolonial theory, transnational analysis, Marxism, etc.
  • • History of disability: Antiquity, Middle Ages, Victorian Age, Industrial Age, etc.
  • • Law and public policy, and disability
  • • Qualitative and quantitative research pertaining to disability
  • • Education and disability
  • • Culture: disability-related popular culture, television, videos, blogs, arts, literature and film analysis
  • • Employment, market, workforce, and income security in relation to disability
  • • Disability-related topics in social sciences: psychology, sociology, geography, political science
  • • Assessment of accessibility accommodations
  • • Technology and disability

 

Submission guidelines are as follows:

1. Articles must critically address a question about an aspect of disability and offer a new angle of thought and insight; they should contribute to scholarship in the field of Critical Disability Studies. Articles must involve a critical argument, rather than be only descriptive.

2. Articles must be submitted in either English or French. Authors must consent to the translation of their articles for publication.

3. In submitting a manuscript, authors affirm that the research is original and unpublished, is not in press or under consideration elsewhere, and will not be submitted elsewhere while under consideration by the journal.

4. Articles must be 3,000-7,000 words (including quotations, references, footnotes, tables, figures, diagrams, and illustrations).

5. In promoting inclusion and accessibility, the journal accepts and encourages tables, figures, diagrams, and illustrations within the article. However, all tables, figures, diagrams, and illustrations must include detailed written descriptions.

6. An abstract of 100-150 words should summarize the main arguments and themes of the article, the methods and results obtained, if the author’s own research was conducted, and the conclusions reached. A list of 5-7 keywords should also be included after the abstract.

7. We ask that authors are mindful of their language choices pertaining to disability and that they justify the use of controversial words.

8. Articles are peer-reviewed. Authors’ names and other identifying information must be removed in order to be sent to reviewers.

9. Authors are responsible for ethics approval for manuscripts by receiving approval from their own institutions. Proof of ethics approval (if applicable) should be provided to the journal.

10. The journal’s style generally follows the most recent edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association; English spelling follows the most recent edition of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary.

11. Manuscripts must be entirely double-spaced (including quotations, notes, references) in 12-point Times New Roman font.

12. The journal accepts footnotes, but only sparingly.

 

To submit, register as an author on our website:  https://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index.php/cdd and undergo the submission process.  Registration is free.

If you have any questions, contact CDD Managerial Editor, Elisabeth Harrison, at cdsj@yorku.ca

For more information and updates, please visit http://cdssa.wordpress.com/

 

DRF News

CFP: Borders without Boundaries: Canadian Disability Studies Association 2014 Annual Conference (May 2014, Canada)

Call for Papers

Borders without Boundaries: Canadian Disability Studies Association 2014 Annual Conference

Date: Wednesday May 28 – Friday May 30, 2014

Where: Brock University, St. Catherines Ontario, Canada

**DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS: extended to 15 November 2013**

The Canadian Disability Studies Association invites abstract submissions for papers to be presented at the 11th annual conference to be held at Brock University. Our CDSA meeting is part of the larger Congress 2014 of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

CDSA’s 2014 theme “Borders without Boundaries” reflects the overall Congress theme. We are seeking contributions that demonstrate the ways in which disability challenges, disturbs or blurs the borders of taken for granted or privileged practices in the global north and south. Should your critical work exist beyond or outside of these margins, we still welcome your response to the call.

Submissions are peer-reviewed by panels composed of: faculty, students, and community members.

The five major subthemes are as follows:

1. A disability studies perspective on borders without boundaries

How are images and ideas of disability used to separate, settle and contest cultural divides, political divisions and/or geographic regions? This subtheme broadly considers the relationship between disability and nation-making. We welcome submissions that explore:

  • Disability in global culture and contexts
  • Transnationalisms, border crossings and cosmopolitanisms
  • Disability in relation to colonial continuums and post-/anti-colonial critiques
  • Disability in relation to Aboriginal/First Nations communities
  • Disability and environmental sustainability

2. Disability at the border of academic and activist scholarships

This subtheme broadly explores the tensions between the academic/activist interface. What counts as academic or activist work? What is valued? Can there be academic-activist scholarship? What is gained or loss in a blurring of these endeavours? We welcome submissions exploring:

  • How activism is conceptualized within and without disability studies
  • Disability activist scholarship in the academy
  • Disability studies outreach and education in community-based activism
  • Barriers and facilitators to academic-activist collaborations
  • Disability activist scholarship and social justice

3. Disability at disciplinary borders

This subtheme broadly explores where disability studies is found and placed within the academy. Presentations that consider what makes Canadian Disability Studies distinct are especially encouraged. We welcome submissions exploring:

  • The status and future directions of the field of disability studies in Canada and abroad
  • Professional development for Canadian disability studies students
  • The meaning and limitations of interdisciplinarity in contemporary educational regimes
  • Strategies for troubling, queering and cripping discipline in the academy

4. Disability at the border of mainstream arts and culture

This subtheme explores the ways in which the category of ‘disability’ actively and tacitly creates cultural references, while disability is often simultaneously excluded from mainstream cultural representations. We welcome submissions, including performances or artistic displays, exploring:

  • Arts-based research in disability studies
  • Performances or displays of disability art
  • Literary and cultural analyses using disability studies lenses
  • Historical/contemporary disability communities and cultures

5. Beyond the boundaries of the bordered body – embodiment, technology and virtual spaces

This subtheme explores how disability troubles unexamined relations to the meaning and appearance of “bodies” and embodied relations. We welcome submissions exploring:

  • Disability and the materiality of the body
  • Disability, desire, gender and sexuality
  • Disability, race and racialization
  • The meaning of the ‘human’ and human/technology interfaces

Abstract guidelines:

All session formats are 90 minutes in length. There will be 3-4 papers per session and each paper will be 15-20 minutes in length depending upon the number of papers within the session.

Individual Papers – Individual presentations will be placed alongside two-three other panelists who share a similar focus. A submission will include the following: 1) name, affiliation and contact information 2) a biographical note: 100-150 words as a separate document 3) paper title and a 250 word abstract; the abstract should consist of the following:

  • stated purpose and relevance to one or more of the conference themes
  • significance of the proposal to the field
  • include relevant literature to support your abstract
  • explicit use of disability studies theory, perspective or concepts
  • describe how the work was done
  • contributions to research, theory, activism, advocacy or social change
  • 4 or 5 key words that describe your abstract
  • details of audiovisual needs (e.g. DVD, LCD projection, and/or VHS).

Panels (3-5 more persons) – People submitting a panel abstract are asked to identify and submit proposals around a central topic, theme, or approach. The abstract should include the following:

  • all information as stated in the Individual paper section as appropriate
  • a panel title and a 350 word abstract that illustrates the coherence between each of the panel presentations

Workshops – Interactive sessions organized around a central theme. People submitting workshops should include:

  • all information as stated in the Individual paper section as appropriate
  • workshop title and a 350 word abstract; the description of the workshop’s objectives and content should be as specific as possible

Performances –This may include poetry reading, dance, a viewing, or an installation. We will do our best to provide a suitable space but please be prepared to improvise! Abstract should include:

  • all information as stated in the Individual paper section as appropriate
  • a performance title and a 350 word abstract; the description of the performance content should be as specific as possible

Submission Guidelines

1. Submit via email attachment to: cdsa.acei@gmail.com – by 15 November 2013. The subject line should read, “CDSA-ACEI proposal for Borders without Boundaries”.

2. Attachments should be in pdf format.

3. Please send in two documents for each abstract.

a. One abstract document will have your name, affiliation and complete contact information.

b. The second abstract document must be anonymous. Do not put your name or any other identifying information on the abstract. In addition, be sure to anonymize your pdf document by clicking on “File”, then “Properties”, removing your name if it appears in the “Author” line, and resaving before uploading it. If any identifying information is included on the abstract, the abstract will be returned to the author unevaluated.

We anticipate notifying participants of abstract status by Dec 14, 2013. If your paper is accepted for the 11th CDSA-ACEI conference at Congress you will need to register for Congress as well as for CDSA-ACEI. Registration will be open starting mid-January 2014. Instructions for how to register will be posted at www.congress2014.ca/register. We would appreciate speakers registering by Jan 30, 2014. If this is not possible please email us.