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PhD studentship: Children with Learning Disabilities as Digital Audiences (Univ. of Glasgow, UK)

AHRC funded PhD studentship at the University of Glasgow in collaboration with BBC Scotland: “Children with Learning Disabilities as Digital Audiences”

Applications are invited for a full PhD studentship in Film and Television Studies at the University of Glasgow to work in collaboration with the Children’s Department at BBC Scotland. The aim of the project is to explore the provision and design of digital media by the BBC for older children with learning disabilities. This exciting opportunity will require the researcher to divide his or her time between the University of Glasgow and the Children’s Department within BBC Scotland (situated in the Pacific Quay in Glasgow). The student will have unique access to the Children’s Department, working amongst BBC staff to capture a sense of the existing provision of digital content for children with learning disabilities and the ways in which BBC Scotland engage with this audience. The project will then continue through a small scale qualitative study that will capture how, why and when digital media is used, interpreted and enjoyed by members of this specific audience. The student will then return to the BBC with their research findings and work alongside colleagues to develop a ‘pitch’ for the design or redesign of digital content that will allow the BBC to respond directly to the needs and desires of their targeted audience.

The specific question this project poses is how we might re-imagine content for differently-abled audiences that is appropriate to both their cognitive abilities and their personal/social needs and desires. (Aims and Objectives are posted below)

A supervisory team from across both institutions will oversee this work and full research training (including audience research skills if required) will be offered. The team will include Dr. Amy Holdsworth and Professor Karen Lury from the University of Glasgow and Ms. Sara Harkins (Head of Children’s BBC Scotland) with relevant support from professional colleagues within BBC Scotland.

he studentship is funded for three years to commence in October 2016 and covers tuition fees at the Home/EU rate. Home students and EU students who have lived in the UK for 3 years prior to the award will also receive a maintenance bursary (stipend) of approx. £14,296 for 16-17 plus an additional £550 travel allowance. In addition, the student is eligible to receive up to £1,000 a year from the BBC to support travel or other expenses directly related to the doctoral research, and will be given use of a desk and computer at the University of Glasgow and appropriate access and resources at the BBC. All AHRC Collaborative PhD students automatically become part of the UK-wide Collaborative Doctoral Partnership development scheme which will provide training in a range of skills needed for research within museums, archives, galleries and heritage organisations.

Informal enquiries are welcome.

Please write to Dr. Amy Holdsworth (Amy.Holdsworth@glasgow.ac.uk ) in the first instance.

Candidates ideally should have:

  • A good 2.1 Honours (or B.A.) degree in a relevant Arts or Social Science discipline.
  • A Masters degree in a related discipline or appropriate professional experience within children’s media, digital media, audience development, working with children and young people with disabilities.
  • A good understanding of contemporary Children’s Television, digital media and issues and debates within disability studies
  • An interest in, or first-hand knowledge of, audience research. • Applicants should be able to demonstrate strong research capabilities and be fluent in spoken and written English.

Applications should include: • A statement of no more than 1,000 words indicating what skills and experience you have that will be relevant for the project. • A current CV • Degree transcripts (this may be an interim transcript if you are still studying) • An example of writing – e.g. academic essay, professional report – up to 3000 words in length • 2 academic/professional references (these may be sent directly from your referees if they would prefer)

Applications to be sent to Jeanette.Berrie@glasgow.ac.uk (Research Administrator, School of Culture and Creative Arts, University of Glasgow) with the subject line BBC CDA.

Closing Date: Wednesday 15th June 2016

Interviewees will be notified by Thursday 23rd June and interviews will take place at the University of Glasgow on Friday 1st July 2016.

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The Project: Through initial audience development work, colleagues at BBC Scotland have already observed the ways in which digital content designed for a young (‘pre-school’) audience is being used by older children with learning disabilities. They have recognized that while these young people may have less sophisticated ‘operational’ abilities their desire and interest in age appropriate content is not necessarily affected. In simple terms, games or interactive challenges aimed at 4-7year olds may represent an appropriate operational challenge (how to work the game, how to move about and between different parts of the page) but are inappropriate in terms of content (older children and young people are more likely to respond positively to content such as WolfBlood rather than In the Night Garden or ‘Mr. Tumble’). The project will therefore focus on this particular issue and ask how we might re-imagine content for differently-abled audiences that is appropriate to their cognitive abilities and their personal/social needs and desires.

 Aims and objectives.

The aims and objectives of this collaborative project are designed to both reflect upon and develop the BBC’s relationship with its differently abled child audience.

Aims

  1. To explore the provision of content for children with learning disabilities: Initial stages of the research will explore the existing provision of digital content for children with learning disabilities and the ways in the children’s department at BBC Scotland engage with this audience (through audience development initiatives, for example). This initial ‘snapshot’ accompanied by critical investigation of academic literature on children, disability and media will form a building block for the student to design and implement a qualitative audience study.
  2. To conduct a small-scale qualitative audience study of children with learning disabilities as digital audiences/users: Utilizing the appropriate methodologies (see below) the student will capture how, why and when digital media is used, interpreted and enjoyed by children with learning disabilities. This fieldwork will importantly also offer the child the opportunity to reflect upon and discuss their use of digital media (e.g. their preferences, desires, likes and dislikes).

Objectives

  1. The student will disseminate research findings through traditional academic outputs and through partnership with the BBC: One of the principle objectives of the project is for the research to have an avenue of dissemination within the BBC to allow the institution to reflect upon and develop their own practices and forms of audience engagement. The links with BBC Scotland and its contacts present opportunities for the research to be accessed by other stakeholder communities and organisations (such as ‘for Scotland’s Disabled Children’ (fSDC)).
  2. To implement research findings through the production of a BBC ‘pitch’: Through the student’s involvement at BBC Scotland he or she will utilise their research on this specific child audience in the development, design or redesign of games, applications or website provision for this audience.
adult care, Children, Familes and Young People, health, mental health, public health, wellbeing

Seminar: Improving children and young people’s health outcomes (Feb 2016: London, UK)

Improving children and young people’s health outcomes: Integration, public health and policy priorities 

Date: Tuesday, 2nd February 2016
Where: Central London
This event is CPD certified

Guest of Honour: Dr Jacqueline Cornish, National Clinical Director for Children, Young People and Transition to Adulthood, NHS England

This seminar will be a timely opportunity to assess priorities for children’s health and wellbeing for the new Parliament. Delegates will consider next steps for improving service delivery for children and young people, and the role of NHS England, Clinical Commissioning Groups and local authorities in promoting positive wellbeing. There will also be discussion on the early impact of new funding for child and adolescent mental health services, and progress made by Public Health England in ensuring every child has the best start in life as one of seven priorities outlined in their five year strategy. Further sessions focus on tackling inequalities, managing the transition to adult care, and challenges for translating research into practice.

We are delighted to include at this seminar keynote addresses from Dr Jacqueline Cornish, National Clinical Director for Children, Young People and Transition to Adulthood, NHS England; Dr Cheryll Adams, Founding Director, Institute of Health Visiting; Professor Dame Sue Bailey, Chair, Children and Young People’s Mental Health Coalition and Chair, Academy of Medical Royal Colleges; Dr Hilary Cass, Senior Clinical Advisor for Children and Young People, Health Education England; Dr David James, Chair, Trainees’ Committee, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and Wendy Nicholson, Lead Nurse for Children, Young People and Families, Public Health England. James Cashmore, Director, Food for Life Partnership; Anna Feuchtwang, Chief Executive Officer, National Children’s Bureau; Emily Fox, Founder, The Albatross Connection; Joe Hayman, Chief Executive, PSHE Association; Louise Taylor, Associate Headteacher, The Compton School, London; Dr Vimal Tiwari, Child Safeguarding Lead, Royal College of General Practitioners and a senior representative from the Greater London Authority have also agreed to speak.

Sir Oliver Heald MP and Earl of Listowel, Treasurer, All-Party Parliamentary Group for Children have kindly agreed to chair this seminar.

A link to the live agenda can be found here.

Uncategorized

Seminar: ‘Great Expectations’ – Child Youth & Family Disability Research Network – South West & Wales

This event (held in Cardiff) will focus on the ‘Lost voices’ of children and youth with disabilites. There will be opportunities to network with other interested people to explore ‘Great Expectations’ for disabled children and youth and listen to 2 speakers who will present their research:

Dr Aaron Prtichard from Bangor University: ‘Lost Voices? Young People with Palliative Care Needs’

Dr Kirsty Liddiard from the University of Sheffield and the Sexuality Working Alliance Group (Open University and Together for Short Lives)’:“I need privacy and respect for privacy as a sexual person”: Young People’s Voices, Sex/uality and the Palliative Care Context.

More information: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/great-expectationschild-youthfamily-disability-research-network-sw-wal-tickets-15045553656?utm_campaign=new_event_email&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb_email&utm_term=eventurl_text

DRF News

Pacific Rim International Conference (May, 2015: Hawaii, USA)

from… the organisers of the Pacific Rim International Conference (May, 2015: Hawaii, USA)

 

“For our 31st edition, Pac Rim is merging and partnering with another conference, so there is sure to be plenty of surprises! 

The Pacific Rim International Conference, considered one of the most ‘diverse gatherings’ in the world, encourages and respects voices from “diverse” perspective across numerous areas, including: voices from persons representing all disability areas; experiences of family members and supporters across all disability and diversity areas; responsiveness to diverse cultural and language differences; evidence of researchers and academics studying diversity and disability; stories of persons providing powerful lessons; examples of program providers, and; action plans to meet human and social needs in a globalized world.

In 2015, new topic areas will promote thoughtful discussion and suggest new ways to integrate education, technology, advocacy, activism and interdisciplinary research. We all strive to strengthen communities and enhance the lives of all human beings. Together, we can harness the tremendous synergy generated by the intermingling and cross-fertilization of diverse perspectives, and ‘spread the word’ as we continue our professional and personal life journey.

Take your first steps to the islands by visiting the website: www.pacrim.hawaii.edu.

We welcome your ideas, suggestions and enthusiasm. Then join us in Waikiki, Hawaii, May 18 & 19, 2015.”

 

DRF News, Spain

Event Announcement: “The Radicalisation of Care: Practices, Politics and Infrastructures” (Nov, 2014: Spain)

Title: “The Radicalisation of Care: Practices, Politics and Infrastructures” 

Dates: 19th – 20th November 2014

Venue: William J. Mitchell room (7th floor), MediaTIC building. Roc Boronat, 117, Barcelona, Spain.

Topic: The concept of radicalisation is usually associated to a process by which groups or individuals come to adopt increasingly extreme or immoderate positions, ideals or aspirations. But it also speaks of the attempts at introducing fundamental or far-reaching changes in a certain area or field. Drawing on this second meaning, in this workshop we aim to explore a series of trends that lead us to think that we might be facing a process of radicalisation of care.

Organising team: Daniel López, Israel Rodríguez Giralt & Tomás Sánchez Criado. Open University of Catalonia

Speakers: Madeleine Akrich, Blanca Callén, Jérôme Denis & David Pontille, Rob Imrie, Joanna Latimer, Daniel López, Andrew Power, Tomás Sánchez Criado, Vololona Rabeharisoa, Israel Rodríguez Giralt, Celia Roberts, Manuel Tironi & Myriam Winance.

Graphic report by Carla Boserman

Sponsored by: LaCaixa Internationalisation at Home 2014.

The event is free, although registration is needed.

All information available here: http://radicare.net

‪#‎radicare

DRF News

Symposium: Disability and Austerity: Pan-national Reflections (May, 2014: Sheffield, UK)

Event: Symposium: Disability and Austerity: Pan-national Reflections

Date/Time: 8th May 2014   2pm-5pm

Venue: University of Sheffield – Education Building, Room 1.02. http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/ssid/maps/education

Description: The symposium will include the following brief presentations to spark debate and conversation:

  • Dan Goodley (University of Sheffield, UK): Defining and contesting austerity
  • Nick Hodge (Sheffield Hallam University, UK): The impact of austerity on the aspirations of people with autism
  • Katherine Runswick Cole (Manchester Metropolitan University, UK): Cruel optimism and disability
  • Susana Rojas Pernia (University of Cantabria, Spain): Disability barriers in Spain
  • Rebecca Lawthom (Manchester Metropolitan University, UK): Revolting subjects and austerity

If you would like to attend please email d.goodley@sheffield.ac.uk

If you like the sound of this… also consider coming to the May DRF seminar. Details below.

Wednesday, 7th May 2014: 10.30am-12.30pm – Arundel 10111 (SHU)

Slot 1:  Joshua Sawiuk (Univ of Leeds, UK): The Importance of the Social Life for Disabled Students in Higher Education

Slot 2: Charlotte Jones (Univ. of Sheffield, UK): Intersex and/as Disability: Exploring the tensions between identity, medicalisation and social justice

DRF News

CFP: CAMHS 2014 Conference (Children and Young People’s Mental Health) – Northampton, UK: July, 2014

Event:  CAMHS 2014 Conference (Children and Young People’s Mental Health)

Theme: Learning from the Past, Looking to the Future

Date: 2-4 July 2014

Venue: Park Campus, University of Northampton, UK 

First call for papers: Following on from the successful 2013 Child and Adolescent Mental Health, this 3 day conference aims to provide a space in which professionals and academics can explore research, theory and practice in child and adolescent mental health. It is an opportunity to reflect on and critique established research, policy and practice, to share and celebrate what works, and to explore solutions to the challenges of the future.

Papers, posters, workshops, symposia and other contributions are invited that engage the conference theme. Some suggestions of possible focuses include:

  • Promoting mental health
  • Critical perspectives in children’s mental health
  • Widening access to CAMH services
  • Social relationships, mental health and wellbeing
  • Cultural issues in CAMHS
  • Innovations in CAMHS
  • Outcomes monitoring
  • Mental Health policy
  • Gender and sexualities
  • Working with families
  • Mental health in schools
  • • Early Interventions and many more

Keynote Speakers

Kathryn Pugh: Kathryn is the Programme Lead for Children and Young People’s IAPT. She has managed the programme since its inception in January 2011.  Her first job in the NHS was in primary care, moving to commissioning primary, secondary and specialist care in both acute and mental health. She joined YoungMinds to run SOS project for 16-25s and became Head of Policy and Innovation, leading for the Mental Health Alliance and Children’s Charities on lobbying to change the Mental Health Act to reflect the needs of children and young people, including amendments to prevent inappropriate admission of under 18s to adult mental health wards.

Kathryn joined the National CAMHS Support Service as a CAMHS Regional Development Worker in London and simultaneously worked for first NIMHE then NMHDU as National Lead for the Children and Young People’s Programme implementing the MHA 2007, then ran the joint NCSS NMHDU MH Transitions programme.

Professor Peter Fonagy, PhD, FBA, OBE: Peter is National Clinical Lead of Children and Young People’s Improving Access to Psychological Therapies and Director of UCL Partners’ Mental Health and Well-Being Programme.

Professor Peter Smith: Peter is Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Unit for School and Family Studies at Goldsmiths College, University of London. His research interests include social development in the home and school; play; aggression and bullying in childhood; cyberbullying; and the similarities and differences between bullying in western countries, Japan, and South Korea.

Dr Katherine Runswick-Cole: Katherine is a Senior Research Fellow in Disability Studies and Psychology, at Manchester Metropolitan University. Katherine’s research has mainly focused on the lives of disabled children and their families and draws on a critical disability studies perspective.

Professor Arlene Vetere: Arlene is professor of family therapy and systemic practice at Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, Norway, and affiliate professor of family studies, in the department of family studies, Malta University.  Arlene retired from her post as professor of clinical psychology at Surrey University in December, 2013 in order to spend more time writing. Her latest book is edited with Miochael Tarren-Sweeney, The Mental Health Needs of Vulnerable Children, published by Routledge, 2014. She has co-written ‘Systemic Therapy and Attachment Narratives’ with Rudi Dallos, 2009, Routledge.

Peter Stratton: Peter is Emeritus Professor of Family Therapy at the Leeds Family Therapy & Research Centre.

Submission for the First Call for Papers are invited. The closing date for the first call is 16 March 2014. You are welcome to submit either individual papers, symposia, or workshop proposals, as well as abstracts for posters. Please complete the abstract submission form.

Authors submitting their abstract for the first call for papers should expect a response from the panel by no later than 11 April 2014. This will enable them to take advantage of the Early Bird registration for the conference.

Second call for papers: The deadline for the second call for papers is 12 May 2014

Information regarding registration can be found here.

Please note that, as with all academic conferences, it is expected that speakers register for at least the day on which they are presenting. This facilitates shared learning, which is a key aim of the conference.

Contact us: please email: camhs@northampton.ac.uk

DRF News

Event: ‘Listening to dis/abled children in research’ w/Katherine Runswick-Cole (Feb 2014: SHU, UK)

Date: Thursday February 20th 2014

Venue: Stoddart Building, Room 7330 http://www.shu.ac.uk/university/visit/find-us/plancity.html. at Sheffield Hallam University, UK.  

Time: Refreshments will be available from 4.00pm and the seminar will begin at 4.30pm. Latest end time will be 6.30pm.

The Equality, Diversity and Social Justice Research group presents a seminar by Dr. Katherine Runswick-Cole (Manchester Metropolitan University, UK)

Title: Listening to dis/abled children in research: Thinking about policy and practice

Abstract: Listening to the voice of the child has long been a key concern of practitioners, policy makers and researchers.  And yet, children and young people continue to report that they are not being listened to when important decisions are made about their lives (HMSO, 2013).  These challenges are often magnified in the lives of disabled children whose lives are often pushed to the margins as they are excluded from the category of children ‘able’ to give their views (Curran and Runswick-Cole, 2013).  In this presentation, I will reflect on the joys and challenges of listening to children’s views in the research process.  The paper draws on examples from two recently completed research projects (Does Every Child Matter, post-Blair?  The interconnections of disabled childhoods, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, 2008 – 2011; Resilience in the lives of disabled people across the life course, funded by Scope, 2011-2013) as well as from two books (Currran & Runswick-Cole, 2013; Mallett and Runswick-Cole, 2014) in order to consider how a dialogue between research, policy and practice might open up opportunities for listening to children.

References

  • Curran, T. and Runswick-Cole, K. (2013) Disabled Children’s Childhood Studies: critical perspectives in a global context, London: Palgrave MacMillan.
  • HMSO (2013) Children and Families Bill, London: HMSO.
  • Mallett, R. and Runswick-Cole, K. (2014) Approaching Disability: critical issues and perspectives, Abingdon: Routledge.

Katherine is Senior Research Fellow in Disability Studies and Psychology at the Research Institute for Health and Social Change at Manchester Metropolitan University  http://www.rihsc.mmu.ac.uk/staff/profile.php?surname=Runswick-Cole&name=Katherine

Attendance is FREE! but space will be limited so if intending to come please email Ian Chesters at i.chesters@shu.ac.uk

DRF News

Event at the Centre for Understanding Social Practices – Public Seminar

Event:  Public Seminar at the Centre for Understanding Social Practices

Theme: Re-thinking social practices and social theory: new knowledge for identity, community and childhood

When: 5pm on Wednesday 15 January 2014

Where: in The Watershed, 1 Canon’s Road, Harbourside, Bristol BS1 5TX

Launching 3 new publications from members of University of the West of England’s Centre for Understanding Social Practices (CUSP) and Manchester Metropolitan University’s Research Institute for Health and Social Change, this seminar will offer introductory comments, a short presentation, and an audience discussion of:

1. Tillie Curran and Katherine Runswick-Cole (eds)’s ‘Disabled children’s childhood studies: Critical approaches in a global context’

2. Liz Frost and Stuart McClean’s ‘Thinking about the life-course: A psychosocial introduction’

3. Billie Oliver and Bob Pitt’s ‘Engaging communities and service users: Context, themes and methods’

Followed by a drinks reception.

Register now.

Cost: Free
Contact: Eleri Heathcote
E-mail: eleri.heathcote@uwe.ac.uk

Children, Familes and Young People

Exploring ‘Children, Families and Disability’ Events

We thought we’d share some more details for the trilogy of *FREE!*events focusing on ‘children, families and disability’ at MMU.   For more information from the organissrs and/or register your attendance please email Katherine Runswick-Cole: k.runswick-cole@mmu.ac.uk

Event 1: Debates in Disability Studies Symposium II: Parenting Disabled Children

Date: 16th March 2011 ~ 11am-3.30pm

Venue: New Lecture Theatre, Gaskell Campus, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. 

Brief Description:  This symposium is the second in a series of events that will reflect on some of the current theoretical and political debates facing disability studies in the UK. It is free to attend and will be of interest to undergraduate and postgraduate students, researchers of disability studies and related subjects and disability activists.

 Confirmed speakers and papers include:

  • ”I just want some peace in my life’: emotional labour and ‘care’ work in mothering a disabled child’ ~ Chrissie Rogers (Anglia Ruskin University)
  • ”Basically I had a baby and it has completely and utterly affected every area of my life’: Saying the unthinkable in disability studies ~Sara Ryan (Oxford University)
  • ‘Response paper’ ~ Katherine Runswick-Cole (Manchester Metropolitan University)

Event 2: Critical Disability Studies Conference: Child, Family and Disability

Date: 5th April 2011 ~ 10am-4pm

Venue: New Lecture Theatre, Gaskell Campus, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. 

Brief Description:  Call for Papers: This conference brings together an international group of disability studies researchers. This call for papers seeks contributions around the following areas:

  • Challenging the psychologisation of childhood
  • Making sense of normal and normalcy
  • Making sense of and challenging ableism
  • Questioning concepts of ‘good parenting’
  • Intersections of child, gender, class, ethnicity, ability
  • Exploring policy conceptions of child and disability
  • Bringing together ideas from the human and social sciences and humanities

Deadline for paper abstracts: 28th February 2011
Deadline for attendance: 31st March 2011

Event 3: ‘Does Every Child Matter, Post-Blair’: The Interconnections of Disabled Childhoods’ – End of Project Conference

Date: 6th April 2011 ~ 10am-4pm

Venue: New Lecture Theatre, Gaskell Campus, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. 

Project and conference funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (RES-062-23-1138)

Brief Description:  The aim of this conference is to introduce and discuss the findings of the project: ‘Does Every Child Matter, post-Blair?: The interconnections of disabled childhoods’.  The project has explored what it is like to be a disabled child in post-Blair England.  Findings touch on the following key issues:

  • Children’s voices
  • Parents/carers’ views
  • Enabling professional practice
  • Policy for disabled children
  • Methodological approaches
  • Disabled child in the Coalition era

The conference will include keynotes by: Professor Dan Goodley and Dr Katherine Runswick-Cole (Manchester Metropolitan University), Dr Janice McLaughlin (Newcastle University) and Dr Angharad Beckett (Leeds University)

Deadline for paper abstracts: 28th February 2011
Deadline for attendance: 31st March 2011