DRF News

Event: DRF ‘Encore’ Seminar: 25th May 2012 (Sheffield, UK)

The final DRF seminar of the 2011-12 academic year is scheduled for tomorrow (3rd May 2012)  and we are pleased to announce that there will be an encore.

Date/Time: Fri. 25th May 2012 (Friday) 1.00pm – 2.30pm

Venue: Room 10212 in the Arundel Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University (More information on the venue can be found here.) Please note the change to our usual room.

Join us for:

Everything about us without us: the struggle of disability activists for Independent Living in Iceland

Embla Ágústsdóttir, chairwoman of the independent living cooperative in Iceland (NPA miðstöðin), embla@npa.is

&

Freyja Haraldsdóttir, directress, of the independent living cooperative in Iceland (NPA miðstöðin), freyja@npa.is

Iceland is one of the countries that lacks policy and practice for personal assistance and independent living for disabled people. A user-led cooperative on personal assistance was founded by 33 disabled citizens in Iceland in 2010, who have since been fighting for the recognition of personal assistance as a way in providing services.

The government decided in the beginning of 2011 to start a three-year pilot project following the transference of services for disabled people from the state to the municipalities. This pilot project has been delayed but is in its first stages and will be ongoing until the end of year 2014 when personal assistance is supposed to become a legal right.

In this presentation we want to shed some light on the struggle for independent living in Iceland. We want to share our experience on how this process has developed from the viewpoint of disability activists and how we have experienced the need to fight for our involvement and having a voice, even when it comes to working with disability organizations and the academia.

Is, after all, everything about us supposed to be without us?

Please feel free to circulate.

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DRF News

Getting Involved in the DRF…

The Disability Research Forum (DRF) will soon be entering its seventh year and is establishing itself as a significant international network of researchers (independent and those allied to particular education institutions or NGOs ) as well as anybody who has a committed interest in all things related to the study of disability and impairment. 

We thought we’d share with you some of the many ways to get involved, raise your profile and generally big up disability studies…

Our People Page

We have members from within the UK and beyond, including countries such as Canada, Kenya and Botswana.  As it is the diversity of its members which makes the DRF such a vibrant and interesting space, please consider adding your details to our People page.  If your details are already on there, please double-check they are up-to-date.  Any additions or changes can be sent to Rebecca Mallett (r.mallett@shu.ac.uk)

Recent additions include:

Nadia Ahmed: nadia.ahmed@qmul.ac.uk – PhD Research Student, School of Business and Management, Queen Mary University of London, UK. Nadia’s research focuses on practicable working environments for disabled academics in UK based universities. She is also the president of the Ability Society at Queen Mary University of London.

Nick Chown: nick@chown.fsbusiness.co.uk – PhD Student and Associate Lecturer, Faculty of Development and Society, Sheffield Hallam University, UK.  Nick’s doctoral research focused on language methods and language-games in autism.  His previous research interests have included barriers to learning for students with autism in further education, and autism awareness and understanding in the UK police service.  He is currently investigating the use of email as an autism-friendly interviewing tool.

Harriet Cooper: harriet.aj.cooper@googlemail.com – MPhil/PhD Researcher, Department of English and Humanities, Birkbeck College, University of London, UK. Her MA dissertation, entitled ‘The Ideal of Self-sufficiency and the Physically Disabled Subject in Contemporary Anglo-American Culture’, drew on ideas from cultural theory, disability studies, gender studies and psychoanalysis. Her PhD research explores the rise of the notion of the ‘normal child’ in Anglo-American culture and its impact on cultural constructions of the physically impaired child.

Alice Mathers: a.mathers@sheffield.ac.uk – Research Associate, Department of Landscape, Sheffield University, UK. Alice’s work is driven by an interdisciplinary approach to people-environment interactions, which straddles the academic boundaries of landscape architecture, planning, sociology, disability studies, human geography and environmental psychology. Her research with disabled people seeks to challenge current professional, academic and societal constraints that inhibit the involvement of underrepresented communities. Click here for profile.

Our Publications Page

An important part of the DRF is keeping each other up to date with the latest research and scholarly activity surrounding the study of disability.  Please consider adding your recent (or forthcoming) publications to our Publications Page.  If your details are already on there, please double-check any ‘forthcoming’ entries and send the correct details upon publication.  Any updates or additions can be sent to Rebecca Mallett (r.mallett@shu.ac.uk)

DRF Seminar Series

Details of the next seminar are below.  We will be shortly announcing dates for 2012-13 so watch this space if you would like to present a paper in an upcoming seminar.  (Please note: There is currently a slot available for the seminar on 3rd May 2012 (Thurs) 2pm-4pm. If you could and would like to fill this slot please get in touch asap.)

Date/Time: 18th April 2012 (Weds) 1pm-3pm

Venue: Room 10111 in the Arundel Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University (More information on the venue can be found here.)

Slot 11: Will Southwell-Wright (Department of Archaeology, University of Durham): Past Perspectives: What can Archaeology offer to Disability Studies?

Slot 12: Tom Campbell (School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Leeds): Bio-politics, resistance and the social model of disability

Further details (including abstracts) are available here.

DRF News

Reminder of Next DRF Seminar: 18th April 2012 (1pm-3pm)

DRF Seminar Series: Seminar #6 

Date/Time: 18th April 2012 (Weds) 1pm-3pm

Venue: Room 10111 in the Arundel Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University (More information on the venue can be found here.)

Slot 11: Will Southwell-Wright (Department of Archaeology, University of Durham): Past Perspectives: What can Archaeology offer to Disability Studies?

Over the past three decades criticisms of androcentricm and ethnocentrism have largely been resolved within archaeological thought and have given rise to a prolific literature that examines the archaeologies of gender, ethnicity, sexuality and a variety of other identities in a range of past contexts. Comparatively speaking however the archaeology of disability and disabled identities remains under-developed, and the pictures of the past that archaeologists reconstruct often remain able-bodied in character.  Given the range of archaeological evidence we have to begin reconstructing experiences of disability, including iconography, evidence for medical treatment and the skeletal remains of impaired people, this lack of dedicated study is increasingly amiss. This paper will demonstrate how the understandings of sociological and historical analyses offered by Disability Studies offer archaeologists the means to understand this evidence in a manner that avoids making reductive statements about past experiences. Crucially however, it will be demonstrated that Archaeology has much to offer Disability Studies as well, drawing on examples from Roman Britain it will be shown how archaeological evidence can open up insight into areas which historical sources remain silent on.  This paper then demonstrates how archaeological understandings which work in dialogue with Disability Studies have the potential to offer valuable insights into the past experience of impairment and disability, and argues for greater collaborative work in the future.

Slot 12: Tom Campbell (School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Leeds): Bio-politics, resistance and the social model of disability

When bio-politics has been operationalized as a mode of analysis in disability studies (and aligned disciplines) it has concentrated on how bodies are subjectivated; how an identity is assigned to an individual, particularly through the mechanism of the norm that results in the constitution of particular impairment categories, work that I myself have begun to undertake and consider to have great value. However, despite Foucault’s warnings to refuse all attempts of understanding power negatively, work on bio-power and bio-politics throughout the social and human sciences typically carries a negative tone.  In this paper I wish to explore whether the disabled peoples movement’s positive re-articulation of difference and singularity on individuals own terms, re-imagining their own bodies and the bodies of others, contra to tactics of power that have hitherto been articulated onto them, should be considered as example of the invention of the ‘common’ as understood by Antonio Negri and Judith Revel. The paper will explore how the Disabled People’s Movement in the UK and the social model of disability has allowed for the re-invention of both individual and collective bodies and possibly begun the invention of the common, through the reframing of disability as a social process of discrimination linked to the material conditions of societal organization, rather then resulting from individual biological deficit. 

Next Seminar: 3rd May 2012 (Thurs) 2pm-4pm

Slot 13: Steven Graby (Centre for Disability Studies, University of Leeds): Autism and/as “disabled” identity

Slot 14: Slot Available (if you’d like to present a paper please get in touch)

…and don’t forget the Call for Papers for the excellent Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane: 3rd International Conference is out now!

DRF News

Reminder of Next DRF Seminar: 15th March 2012 (1.30pm-3.00pm)

DRF Seminar Series: Seminar #5

Date/Time: 15th March 2012 (Thurs) 1.30pm-3.00pm

Venue: Room 10111 in the Arundel Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University (More information on the venue can be found here.)

  • Slot 9: Sarah Thompson (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University): Disability Focused Reflections on Attending a Fulbright Summer Institute ‘Education in the 21st Century’

Sarah will share her experiences of attending the Fulbright Summer Institute ‘Education in the 21st Century’ (USA, 2011), by exploring the many ‘disability’ moments she encountered and reflecting on the different ways in which these moments were experienced by other members of the Institute.   

  • Followed by Roundtable Discussion on ‘Disability Research: Current Issues’. (Please note: the paper by Tom Andrews has been postponed until further notice.)

Next Seminar: 18th April 2012 (Weds) 1pm-3pm

Slot 11: Will Southwell-Wright (Department of Archaeology, University of Durham): Past Perspectives: What can Archaeology offer to Disability Studies?

Slot 12: Tom Campbell (School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Leeds): Bio-politics, resistance and the social model of disability

…and don’t forget the Call for Papers for the excellent Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane: 3rd International Conference is out now!

DRF News

Details of Next DRF Seminar: 8th February 2012 (1pm-3pm)

DRF Seminar Series: Seminar #4

Date/Time: 8th February 2012 (Weds) 1pm-3pm

Venue: Room 10111 in the Arundel Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University (More information on the venue can be found here.)

  • China Mills (Education and Social Research Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University): Globalising Disorder; Crossing Borders through Disorders

Abstract: In an increasingly globalised psycho-pharmacological world, access to psychiatric medication, ‘scaling-up’ of psychiatric services, and closing the ‘treatment gap’ between low and high income countries, are equated with social justice and equality. In this space, mental illness is framed as akin to physical illness; and the argument is made that just as AIDS medications should be available to those in low-income countries, so should psychiatric medications. The incitement of mental health into a discourse of global emergency and crisis suggests an abnormal deviation from a normal order, yet mental illness may also be read as a ‘normal’ reaction to that (dis)order – as a ‘healthy’ response to the ‘unhealthy’ globalisation of Neoliberalism. Yet making the claim that mental health problems, such as Depression, are a ‘normal’ response to inequitable market relations in the global South, may also be normative, as it glosses over a simultaneous globalisation; that of bio-psychiatric explanations of distress. Just as psychiatric diagnostic systems, such as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) blur the borders of normality and abnormality, enabling increasing experiences to be conceptualised in psychiatric terms; they also enable psychiatric disorders to cross geographical borders, enabling the psychiatrisation of new populations, and new ‘emergent markets’ for the pharmaceutical industry. For example,in India, in response to a spate of farmer suicides that occurred due to neoliberal agricultural reforms, the Indian Government launched a study to find a genetic cause for suicide, and campaigners called for anti-depressants to be more widely available to farmers. But what does it mean to frame the distress caused by economic reforms as ‘mental illness’, and provide interventions that work at the level of individual brain chemistry and genes, and that are part of the same neoliberal rationale that led to distress in the first place? This paper will explore what the framing of mental illness as akin to physical illness and disability, makes possible within the field of Global Mental Health, with a specific focus on India. 

  • John Quinn (Department of Politics, University of Sheffield): New Labour and Disability Politics

Abstract: When the ‘New’ Labour government came into power in 1997, it was seen by many previously marginalised groups as an opportunity to have more say in the way the country was run. One of these was a ‘new social movement’ calling for disability rights – which arguably only came into existence in Britain during the mid-1970s and had continued developing during 18 years of Conservative rule. However there had been little unity between different strands of this movement, due not only to the wide range of disabilities represented, but also because of disputes over both ends and means. After a Labour government lasting 13 years this research aims to use a variety of methods to see whether it proved lucky or unlucky for disabled people in Britain, seeing to what extent lives have changed and how much of this is due to the way the government and social movement have impacted on and affected each other.

Next Seminar: 15th March 2012 (Thurs) 1.30pm-3.30pm

Slot 9: Sarah Thompson (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University): Title TBC

Slot 10: Tom Andrews (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University): Exploring the impact of sexuality on the lifeworld of adolescents with autism

DRF News

Details of next DRF Seminar ~ December 2011 (Sheffield, UK)

DRF Seminar Series: Seminar #3

Date/Time: 6th December 2011 (Tues) 12pm-2pm [followed by Christmas drinks!!]

Venue: Room 10111 in the Arundel Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University (More information on the venue can be found here.)

  • Harriet Cooper (Birkbeck College, University of London): Othering and Ordinariness in Representations of the Physically Impaired Child in Anglo-American Culture in the period 1870-1911

Abstract: Although in recent years scholarship in Victorian and Edwardian Studies has begun to explore the issue of disability, it has tended to deal with questions of disability and gender or disability and work and has rarely focussed specifically on the cultural construction of the physically impaired child. When scholarship has explored the figure of the child, it has mainly examined the role of disability in shaping docile women out of unruly or passionate girls.

In this paper, I look at depictions of physically impaired child in the period from another angle. Texts to be examined include Charlotte Yonge’s The Pillars of the House, E. Nesbit’s Harding’s Luck and Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden. Drawing on both the techniques of literary analysis, and on recent scholarship in the field of Childhood Studies, I ask what is specific to representations of impaired children in this period that makes them different from depictions of impaired adults. I consider whether the Victorian impaired child is doubly ‘othered’ by his or her status as a child and as a disabled person, or whether, in fact, the figure of the impaired child is seen as more ‘ordinary’ than the figure of the impaired adult.

I conclude the paper by reflecting on the difficulty of making generalisations about the representation of the impaired child in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Can we say that ‘ordinariness’ is as important as ‘pathology’ as a category for understanding depictions of the physically impaired child at this time?

  • Jenny Slater (Department of Psychology, Manchester Metropolitan University): Time travelling with young disabled people: Developing a queer, crip, critically young, futurist methodology

Abstract: Writing this abstract at the beginning of October, by the time of presentation I will be in the middle of several journeys in which I travel to future best-ever, Utopian, alternative worlds with young disabled people. These journeys will form part of my PhD research. In this paper I return to the present to work through some of the methodological perspectives I endeavour to take when setting out on my exploratory adventures.

Next Seminar: 8th February 2012 (Weds) 1pm-3pm

  • China Mills (Manchester Metropolitan University): Title TBC
  • John Quinn (Department of Politics, University of Sheffield): New Labour and Disability Politics

There are still a few slots available in spring 2012, so if you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar please do get in touch.  Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book on which you’d like to facilitate discussion.  Please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk

DRF News

Reminder: Next DRF Seminar… 16th November (Sheffield, UK)

DRF Seminar Series: Seminar #2

Date/Time: 16th November 2011 (Weds) 2pm-4pm 

Venue: Room 10111 in the Arundel Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University (More information on the venue can be found here.)

  • Manny Madriaga (Sheffield Hallam University): Is seeking the disabled person voice really necessary in empancipatory research?

Abstract: This paper calls for a renewed thinking on emancipatory research when seeking the disabled student ‘voice’ in the arena of higher education.  Drawing on the work of critical race theory, particularly whiteness, disability studies in the United Kingdom recently has been foregrounding the social processes of normalcy.  Normalcy highlights the (re)production of disability in everyday life.  This, of course, raises uncomfortable questions, particularly on the significance of seeking the voice of disabled people. These questions are explored here, reflecting on research that encompassed stories of university support staff and their support of disabled students.

  • Erin Pritchard (Department of Geography, University of Newcastle): Space and time strategies of dwarfs in public space: Body size and rights of access to the built environment

Abstract: In this paper, I aim to explore the experiences of women dwarfs and their encounters with others within the built environment and how space and time affect their experiences and right to access spaces. I argue that a dwarf’s right to access different spaces is affected by both social and spatial barriers which occur during different times and within different spaces. It is argued within this paper that negotiations of everyday spaces – including avoidance due to fear of name-calling – affect a person’s basic rights. More specifically, attention is drawn to the reasons why dwarfs avoid certain areas because of their disability (which in this case is their size) and the ways they respond to particular situations within these spaces. I look at both how the built environment can be inaccessible and also how an attitudinal environment can create inaccessible spaces. Drawing upon recent work by Rosemary Garland Thomson (2011) I intend to show how having a small body results in people becoming ‘misfits’ within society through not fitting the norm both socially and spatially and therefore causing exclusion in various public spaces. This work draws upon ongoing qualitative research with women dwarfs in order to examine their social and spatial experiences and how they negotiate the built environment. The findings from this paper suggest that dwarfs do negotiate the built environment differently often though avoidance of particular spaces and this therefore limits their rights to access spaces.

Next Seminar: 6th December 2011 (Tues) 12pm-2pm

Harriet Cooper (Birkbeck College, University of London): Othering and Ordinariness in Representations of the Physically Impaired Child in Anglo-American Culture in the period 1870-1911

Jenny Slater (Department of Psychology, Manchester Metropolitan University): Time travelling with young disabled people: developing a queer, crip, critically young, futurist methodology

There are still slots available in early 2012, so if you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar please do get in touch.  Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book on which you’d like to facilitate discussion.  Please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk

DRF News

Details of next DRF Seminar ~ November 2011 (Sheffield, UK)

DRF Seminar Series: Seminar #2

Date/Time: 16th November 2011 (Weds) 2pm-4pm 

Venue: Room 10111 in the Arundel Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University (More information on the venue can be found here.)

  • Manny Madriaga (Sheffield Hallam University): Is seeking the disabled person voice really necessary in empancipatory research?

Abstract: This paper calls for a renewed thinking on emancipatory research when seeking the disabled student ‘voice’ in the arena of higher education.  Drawing on the work of critical race theory, particularly whiteness, disability studies in the United Kingdom recently has been foregrounding the social processes of normalcy.  Normalcy highlights the (re)production of disability in everyday life.  This, of course, raises uncomfortable questions, particularly on the significance of seeking the voice of disabled people. These questions are explored here, reflecting on research that encompassed stories of university support staff and their support of disabled students.

  • Erin Pritchard (Department of Geography, University of Newcastle): Space and time strategies of dwarfs in public space: Body size and rights of access to the built environment

Abstract: In this paper, I aim to explore the experiences of women dwarfs and their encounters with others within the built environment and how space and time affect their experiences and right to access spaces. I argue that a dwarf’s right to access different spaces is affected by both social and spatial barriers which occur during different times and within different spaces. It is argued within this paper that negotiations of everyday spaces – including avoidance due to fear of name-calling – affect a person’s basic rights. More specifically, attention is drawn to the reasons why dwarfs avoid certain areas because of their disability (which in this case is their size) and the ways they respond to particular situations within these spaces. I look at both how the built environment can be inaccessible and also how an attitudinal environment can create inaccessible spaces. Drawing upon recent work by Rosemary Garland Thomson (2011) I intend to show how having a small body results in people becoming ‘misfits’ within society through not fitting the norm both socially and spatially and therefore causing exclusion in various public spaces. This work draws upon ongoing qualitative research with women dwarfs in order to examine their social and spatial experiences and how they negotiate the built environment. The findings from this paper suggest that dwarfs do negotiate the built environment differently often though avoidance of particular spaces and this therefore limits their rights to access spaces.

Next Seminar: 6th December 2011 (Tues) 12pm-2pm

Harriet Cooper (Birkbeck College, University of London): Othering and Ordinariness in Representations of the Physically Impaired Child in Anglo-American Culture in the period 1870-1911

Jenny Slater (Department of Psychology, Manchester Metropolitan University): Time travelling with young disabled people: developing a queer, crip, critically young, futurist methodology

There are still slots available in early 2012, so if you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar please do get in touch.  Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book on which you’d like to facilitate discussion.  Please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk

DRF News

Reminder: DRF Seminar Series 2011-12 starts 11th October (Sheffield, UK)

DRF Seminar Series : Seminar #1

Date/Time: 11th October 2011 (Tues) 1pm-3pm 

Slot 1: Jayne Sellick (Department of Geography, University of Durham): The temporality of disabled identities: Examples from participatory work

Abstract: This paper explores the role of time and temporalities in the past and present experiences of participants, who as part of the project self-defined with a disabled identity. Drawing from a Participatory Action Research (P.A.R) agenda, stories relating to disability, impairment, health, chronic pain and illness were recalled. Using empirical examples I will explore the temporality of these experiences by thinking through the (non)representational.

Slot 2: Nick Hodge (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University): Misreading Arthur: Ableism at work in psychoanalysis and counselling

Abstract: Highly developed levels of reflection and self awareness by therapists and counsellors and the acceptance, and celebration, of the personal position of the client are foundational principles of counselling practice. It would be expected, therefore, that the counselling room might be the one space that would transcend the spectres of ableism (Campbell, 2009). However, the experiences of disabled people suggest that even here ableism continues to assert its insidious and invasive control (Reeve, 2000). This paper, by critiquing a particular account of psychotherapy with a disabled child, explores a number of ways in which ableism operates within the counselling room and negotiates the challenge of transversing different epistemic positions (Mackenzie and Leach Scully, 2007). The paper concludes by suggesting that only by watching their watching and reading their readings (Titchkosky, 2007) through an ‘inside-out’ approach (Williams, 1996) might counsellors reveal, confront and exorcise the spectres of ableism.

More information on the venue can be found here.

Next Seminar: 16th November 2011 (Weds) 2pm-4pm

Slot 3: Manny Madriaga (Sheffield Hallam University): Is seeking the disabled person voice really necessary in empancipatory research?

Slot 4: Erin Pritchard (Department of Geography, University of Newcastle): Space and time strategies of dwarfs in public space: Body size and rights of access to the built environment

If you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar please do get in touch.  Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book on which you’d like to facilitate discussion.  Please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk

DRF News

Announcing the DRF Seminar Schedule 2011-2012

Over the past year, the DRF blog has welcomed over 120 subscribers and received well over 13,600 hits.  Today we are please to announce the seminar schedule for 2011-2012 as well as full details for the first seminar on 11th October.  More information on the venue can be found here and we’d like to take this opportunity to remind all presenters of the Accessible Presenting Info here.  We look forward to productive and engaging discussions ahead.

1.                  11th October 2011 (Tues) 1pm-3pm 

Slot 1: Jayne Sellick (Department of Geography, University of Durham): The temporality of disabled identities: Examples from participatory work

Abstract: This paper explores the role of time and temporalities in the past and present experiences of participants, who as part of the project self-defined with a disabled identity. Drawing from a Participatory Action Research (P.A.R) agenda, stories relating to disability, impairment, health, chronic pain and illness were recalled. Using empirical examples I will explore the temporality of these experiences by thinking through the (non)representational.

Slot 2: Nick Hodge (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University): Misreading Arthur: Ableism at work in psychoanalysis and counselling

Abstract: Highly developed levels of reflection and self awareness by therapists and counsellors and the acceptance, and celebration, of the personal position of the client are foundational principles of counselling practice. It would be expected, therefore, that the counselling room might be the one space that would transcend the spectres of ableism (Campbell, 2009). However, the experiences of disabled people suggest that even here ableism continues to assert its insidious and invasive control (Reeve, 2000). This paper, by critiquing a particular account of psychotherapy with a disabled child, explores a number of ways in which ableism operates within the counselling room and negotiates the challenge of transversing different epistemic positions (Mackenzie and Leach Scully, 2007). The paper concludes by suggesting that only by watching their watching and reading their readings (Titchkosky, 2007) through an ‘inside-out’ approach (Williams, 1996) might counsellors reveal, confront and exorcise the spectres of ableism.

2.                 16th November 2011 (Weds) 2pm-4pm

3.                 6th December 2011 (Tues) 12pm-2pm

4.                 8th February 2012 (Weds) 1pm-3pm

5.                 15th March 2012 (Thurs) 1.30pm-3.30pm

6.                 18th April 2012 (Weds) 1pm-3pm

7.                 3rd May 2012 (Thurs) 2pm-4pm

Details of the other seminars will follow shortly.

If you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar please do get in touch.  Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book on which you’d like to facilitate discussion.  Please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk