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Event: Next Steps for Policy on Children and Young People’s Health (February, 2017; London, UK)

Event: Next Steps for Policy on Children and Young People’s Health

Date: Thursday, 2nd February 2017

Place: Central London

Guest of Honour: Dr Jacqueline Cornish, National Clinical Director, Children, Young People and Transition to Adulthood, NHS England

Policymakers and stakeholders at this seminar will discuss next steps for improving children and young people’s health outcomes in England. Delegates will consider the early impact of new models of care on better coordinating children and young people’s health services, and the potential for Sustainable and Transformation Plans in integrating care for local populations. Further sessions focus on public health initiatives – such as the Government’s childhood obesity strategy and the introduction of the levy on the soft drinks industry from 2018, as well as progress on increasing the provision of high quality mental health care for children and young people, as outlined in NHS England’s Business Plan for 2016/17.

At this early stage, Eustace de Sousa, National Lead, Children, Young People and Families, Public Health England; Tim Atkin, Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Chair of Faculty for Children, Young people and their Families, Division of Clinical Psychology, British Psychological Society; Dr Chad Hockey, GP, Hammersmith and Fulham GP Federation; Matthew Hopkinson, Lead for Mental Health and Bullying, Department for Education; Toby Hyde, Head of Strategy, NHS Hammersmith and Fulham Clinical Commissioning Group; Kate Martin, Director, Common Room Consulting; Professor Neena Modi, President, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and Professor of Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College London; Dr Claire Lemer, Deputy Programme Director, Children and Young People’s Health Partnership and Consultant in General Paediatrics and Service Transformation, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust; Richard Stewart, Chair of the Children’s Surgical Forum, Royal College of Surgeons and Consultant Paediatric Surgeon, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham and Dr Sonia Saxena, Clinical Reader in Primary Care, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London have also agreed to speak. Earl of Listowel, Vice-Chair, All‐Party Parliamentary Group for Looked After Children and Care Leavers and Helen Whately MP, Member, Health Select Committee and Co-Chair, All-Party Parliamentary Health Group have kindly agreed to chair this seminar.

Link for more info: http://www.westminsterforumprojects.co.uk/forums/event.php?eid=1369&t=1869

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Westminster Health Forum – Improving care for people with learning disabilities (May, 2016: London, UK)

Seminar Title: Improving Care for People With Learning Disabilities – Commissioning, Regulation And Reducing Hospital Admissions

Date: Wednesday, 11th May 2016

Place: Sixty One Whitehall, London SW1A 2ET

 **This event is CPD certified**

 Guest of Honour: Dr Dominic Slowie, National Clinical Director for Learning Disabilities, NHS England and Chair, North East and Cumbria Learning Disability Network

This timely seminar will provide an opportunity to assess future policy priorities for people with learning disabilities and/or autism across health and social care. Delegates will consider key issues outlined in NHS England, ADASS and the LGA’s Building the Right Support plan, which aims to reduce the reliance on inpatient care, establish a new service model by 2019 and create joined-up Transforming Care Partnerships for health and social care commissioners locally. Further sessions focus on plans outlined in the Department of Health response to the No Voice Unheard, No Right Ignored consultation, which included proposals for a named social worker and potential amendments to regulations in the Mental Health Act 1983. The agenda also looks at next steps for developing the workforce, and challenges for integrating and personalising care for people with learning disabilities through the use of personal budgets and the Integrated Personal Commissioning programme.

For more information, including our speakers, please click here.

DRF News

Centre for Comedy Studies Research (CCSR) Research Seminar Series 2014/15 ‘Comedy, Health and Disability’ – Seminar 1

To celebrate their 1st birthday, the Centre for Comedy Studies Research (CCSR) are holding their first Comedy Matters Research Seminar for 2014-15.

Date: Wednesday 8th October 2014

Time: 4.00pm-5.30pm with a drinks reception/birthday party 5.30pm-6.30pm

Location: Mead Room, Hamilton Centre, Brunel University London, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB8 3PH

Seminar 1 = Comedy and Mental Health Symposium

This symposium will discuss comedy and its relationship to mental health, with speakers discussing the psychology of the stand-up comedian, the use of stand-up comedy in reducing mental health stigma in the military and uses of comedy with mental health service users.

Speakers: Gordon Claridge is Emeritus Professor of Abnormal Psychology, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Emeritus Fellow, Magdalen College, and Visiting Professor, Oxford Brookes University. Professor Claridge is an internationally renowned expert in the relationship between personality and psychological disorders, adopting a broadly dimensional view. Recently, he has been involved in research on the psychology of the stand-up comedian. More generally, his research on the relationship between personality and psychological disorders has been inspired, on the practical front, by working as a clinical psychologist and, on the academic front, by experimental research on the topic. In mid-career he began to focus particularly on psychotic disorders, developing measurement scales for assessing schizotypal characteristics in the general population and using these to examine laboratory correlates in a wide range of subject samples, including relatives of psychotic patients. The central thesis in all of this work is that, while genetically predisposing to mental illness, psychotic characteristics are not in themselves pathological. On the contrary, they may have many healthy adaptive qualities, of which creativity is the most salient example.

Tim Sayers works as one of the arts in health co-ordinators at Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust (LPT). He has a background in mental health nursing, specialising in working with people with severe and enduring mental health problems and also with people with drug and alcohol problems. Tim has been involved with arts in mental health on a voluntary basis for approximately fifteen years; initially as a founder member of the Brainstorm Arts in Mental Health Group in Birmingham, then as the founder member of BrightSparks: Arts in Mental Health Group in 1999. BrightSparks is dedicated to promoting positive images of mental health through the arts and has an expanding portfolio of arts projects which are mainly delivered in partnership with LPT. Tim is dedicated to using the arts, in particular comedy, to promote positive images of mental health, social inclusion, and service user and carer involvement. Tim is studying for an MSc in Recovery and Social Inclusion at Nottingham University at present, and has had articles published in his field in the past. He has extensive experience of teaching and workshop leading and is also an experienced freelance performer and workshop leader in the fields of music, poetry, comedy, magic and circus skills.

John Ryan is a stand-up comedian and one of seven co-researchers at the Department for Military Mental Health, Kings College, London, on a project that examined ‘modifying attitudes to mental health using comedy as a delivery medium’ in the armed forces. The research aimed to use comedy to help persuade military personnel to seek help with mental health issues. John is also winner of the 2011 Scottish Mental Health and Arts Film Festival Best Short Documentary Award, the 2010 NHS Regional Health and Social Care award winner for Mental Health and Well Being and in 2010 received a Royal Society for Public Health Special Commendation for contributions to the field of Arts and Health Equalities.

We are pleased to announce that we have one £40 travel grant available for a low income researcher or PhD student attending this event. Please email Simon Weaver [simon.weaver@brunel.ac.uk] by Monday 29th September 2014 if you wish to apply.  To apply please send a short paragraph (max 250 words) explaining why you wish to attend the seminar.

For catering purposes please register at comedy.studies@brunel.ac.uk

Everyone very welcome!

For more information, please email Dr Sharon Lockyer (Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Communications + Director, Centre for Comedy Studies Research (CCSR), Brunel University, UK) [Sharon.Lockyer@brunel.ac.uk]

Twitter: @Comedy_Studies

DRF News

Minimising Restrictive Practices in Health and Social Care ‘Safe Restraint’ Project – Consultancy Brief September 2014

[Posted on behalf of Disability Sheffield].

Disability Sheffield is a user led organisation, run and controlled by disabled people. We promote independent living for disabled people in Sheffield. By independent living we mean that disabled people have the same freedom and rights to exercise choice and control over their own lives as any other person

As part of Sheffield Individual Employer & PA Development Group and in partnership with Active Independence, Doncaster, we are running a project funded by Skills for Care under their ‘innovative workforce development fund. This project focuses on raising the issues of minimising the use of restrictive practices in Health and Social Care.

Overview of the project

Recent key documents jointly issued by Skills for Care and Skills for Health on Workforce Development Guidance for Employers seeking to minimise the use of Restrictive Practices in Health and Social Care sets out a clear Framework to be used by all (Skills for Care & Skills for Health 2014).

The focus of the project is to start to develop this conversation with individual employers and their Personal Assistants (PAs) by informing employers of the framework and gaining knowledge of how and when to use it as well as looking at developing good practice resources for PAs. Part of developing the conversation means working with representatives of the statutory services to inform and make changes to their practices. The Common Core Principles of self-directed support are about ensuring those people employing their own staff receive personalised and practical support to promote their health & well-being in ways which respect and promote their independence. Minimisation of restrictive practice plays a key part in this.

This project will develop a range of resources that are accessible in format which target employers in receipt of a Direct Payment and those who self-fund. The information raising action will then lead onto following up with developing a range of co-produced resources and events which will raise the profile of the issue and also inform wider implementation as there will be experts through experience informing future learning and practice. Opportunities already exist through current activity that enable a range of communication routes to be used to enable engagement with some harder to reach groups e.g. younger employers and those going through transition.

Project Outputs and Outcomes

By the end of the project, it is intended that a number of key outputs will have been delivered:

  • A general easy read flyer raising the issue & distributed to Individual Employers;
  • Contact with the widest range of employers who might be interested in progressing the project;
  • 3 separate co-produced questionnaires for statutory staff, individual employers & PAs which will provide information on existing practice, help develop a training needs analysis tool and provide a method for delivery to inform future practice;
  • Piloted sessions for individual employers and PAs on how to have the conversation that ‘Recognises the values and idiosyncrasies of the employer ‘, ‘What restrictive practices means’ and ‘Best support / interventions within a social context reflecting the social model of disability’; and
  • Information on sign posting to other support and advice.

It is intended that the project will involve obtaining feedback from up to 40 statutory staff (Social workers and clinical staff ), 20 Individual employers and 20 Personal Assistants. In addition in Sheffield Mentors / Coaches will have been trained to have the discussion and the topic will have been raised at the monthly employer drop in sessions. In Doncaster the topic will have been raised at the regular PA peer support group meetings.

It is intended that the project will result in an increased awareness and development of good practice within Sheffield and Doncaster with regards to appropriate restrictive practice. Alongside this, individual employers, PAs and practitioner will have access during the project and beyond to resource and training information developed during the project to support and develop their practice within this area.

Impact will be measured by the number of people who have been reached and the extent to which awareness has been raised; numbers attending the training sessions and responses to evaluation forms asking people how useful they found the training and the changes they plan to make to their practice.

Delivering the project

We are looking for a consultant to deliver an evaluation of this project. We are content for this to be a freelance/self-employed individual/team or an individual /team based within an institution.

This is a time-limited project and we are therefore looking for someone/a team who would be able to start work immediately. The work needs to be completed by 15th may 2015. There is up to £5,000 (inclusive of VAT if applicable) available for this piece of work.

Skills and knowledge

This is a short term consultancy and the consultant should have an excellent knowledge about the issues that impact on disabled people. We expect the consultant to:

  • Have knowledge of workforce development and innovation in the adult social care sector;
  • Have expertise in both process and impact evaluation – and of both quantitative and qualitative methods;
  • Have knowledge of research governance procedures in the social care sector;
  • Demonstrate their ability (and provide an undertaking) to complete the project within the specified time.
  • Demonstrate their ability to produce work to the highest standards – in particular the final report and project presentation
  • Have in place appropriate CRB/DBS disclosures and safeguarding policies and relevant professional standards/memberships; and
  • Have excellent communication skills and willingness to communicate with the project steering group throughout the course of this consultancy.

The main key tasks of this brief drawing on the practice and learning in Sheffield and Doncaster are to:

  • Provide an evaluation of the delivery of this project, both in terms of the delivery of project outputs and whether (and the extent to which) the project met its intended objectives;
  • Produce a short accessible report and standalone summary, suitable for Skills for Care publication; and
  • Deliver a presentation of key findings and recommendations for future learning and to inform national practice.

Registering your interest

If you are interested in delivering this project please register your interest by submitting a maximum 4 sides of A4 outlining your suitability for this role including your experience and skills and a brief summary of how you would propose to undertake the work, including timings. Additional information (e.g. Brief CVs, lists of relevant projects, testimonials etc.) can be attached.

Please send your expression of interest by 9am on Wednesday 8th October 2014 to: Emily Morton at Emily.morton@disabilitysheffield.org.uk

If you require this information in an alternative format please contact Emily at the above e-mail address or on Sheffield 0114 2536750

Consultancy Arrangements

  • The successful Consultant is expected to sign a contractual agreement prior to commencing work on the project and have relevant self-employed status and insurance cover.
  • The work shall be carried out in the Consultant’s offices and all expenses incurred in carrying out the work required by the brief shall be the responsibility of the Consultant unless otherwise agreed in writing.
  • The Consultant shall treat as confidential any information obtained in the course of the work.

 

DRF News

Event explores SEND reform (May, 2014, UK)

Event: Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar on ‘SEND reform: Implementation, Support and Widening Provision’

with Stephen Kingdom, Deputy Director, Special Educational Needs and Disability, Department for Education

Chaired by: Robert Buckland MP, Chair, All-Party Parliamentary Group on Autism

When: Morning on Thursday, 8th May 2014         Where: Central London        This event is CPD certified

Follow on Twitter @WEdFEvents or at the Website: www.westminstereducationforum.co.uk

N.B.: there is a charge for most delegates, although concessionary and complimentary places are available (subject to terms and conditions – see below).

Description:  This timely seminar will focus on a series of reforms to Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) provision in England set out in the Children and Families Bill, including the announcement of the new SEN reform grant to support local councils ahead of planned implementation in September 2014.  

Delegates will discuss the implications for education, health, and social care providers regarding the decision to replace the ‘statements’ system with new integrated Education, Health and Care Plans.

Further sessions will focus on support for families and the implementation by local authorities of ‘personal budgets’ to buy care and support, and the impact on providers and young people of extending support for SEND to  include 25-year-olds and those with disabilities who do not have special educational needs.

The conference will bring together key policymakers and regulatory officials with local authority representatives, school and college leaders, student support contacts in universities, health and social care professionals, parent groups, children’s charities and academics.

Overall, topics for discussion include:

  • Education, Health and Care Plans: challenges for co-ordination around integrating provision;
  • Personal budgets: supporting families in using their budgets, and providing for those who opt out;
  • The ‘local offer’: increasing choice, awareness, and quality of provision for families with children and young people with SEND; and
  • Extending provision for 25-year-olds: its impact on young people and providers of SEND support, as well as further and higher education institutions.

The draft agenda is regularly updated and the latest version is available to download here. The seminar is organised on the basis of strict impartiality by the Westminster Education Forum.

Speakers: We are delighted to be able to include in this seminar a keynote address from: Stephen Kingdom, Deputy Director, Special Educational Needs and Disability, Department for Education.

Further confirmed speakers include: Meera Craston, Director, SQW Consulting; Eirwen Grenfell-Essam, Chair, Network81; Janet Leach, Head of Service, Joint Service for Disabled Children, Enfield Council and Chair, Short Breaks Network; Andy Minnion, Director, The Rix Centre, University of East London; Peter Quinn, Vice-Chair, National Association of Disability Practitioners and Director of Student Support Services, University of York; Douglas Silas, Principal, Douglas Silas Solicitors; Dr Carol Tozer, Executive Director of Services, Scope; Nigel Utton, Headteacher, Bromstone Primary School, Kent and Chair, Heading for Inclusion and a senior speaker confirmed from Ambitious about Autism.

Additional senior participants are being approached.

Networking: This seminar will present an opportunity to engage with key policymakers and other interested parties, and is CPD certified (more details). Places have been reserved by officials from the DfE; MoJ; Office of the Children’s Commissioner and the TSol. Also due to attend are representatives from Ambitious about Autism; Beech Hill Primary School, Bedfordshire; Bromstone Primary School, Kent; Columbus School and College, Essex; Drumbeat School & ASD Service, London; Hertfordshire County Council; Integrated Services Programme; KCIL; London Borough of Camden; London Borough of Ealing; North Ridge School, Yorkshire; Shaw Trust; SQW Consulting; St Nicholas School, Essex; Stoke City Council; The Village School, London; The Walnuts School; Tribal; UK Behaviour Analysis and Research Group; University of Chichester; University of East London; Wandsworth Connexions SEN Team and Worcestershire County Council.

Overall, we expect speakers and attendees to be a senior and informed group numbering around 120, including Members of both Houses of Parliament, senior officials from the DfE, Ofsted, Ofqual and other Government departments and agencies, schools and teaching professionals, representatives of trade unions and local government, groups representing parents and students, specialist academics and charities, together with representatives of the national and trade press.

Output and About Us: A key output of the seminar will be a transcript of the proceedings, sent out around 10 working days after the event to all attendees and a wider group of Ministers and officials at DfE, HM Treasury and other government departments and agencies affected by the issues; and Parliamentarians with a special interest in these areas. It will also be made available more widely. This document will include transcripts of all speeches and questions and answers sessions from the day, along with access to PowerPoint presentations, speakers’ biographies, an attendee list, an agenda, sponsor information, as well as any subsequent press coverage of the day and any articles or comment pieces submitted by delegates. It is made available subject to strict restrictions on public use, similar to those for Select Committee Uncorrected Evidence, and is intended to provide timely information for interested parties who are unable to attend on the day.

All delegates will receive complimentary PDF copies and are invited to contribute to the content.

The Westminster Education Forum is strictly impartial and cross-party, and draws on the considerable support it receives from within Parliament and Government, and amongst the wider stakeholder community. The Forum has no policy agenda of its own. Forum events are frequently the platform for major policy statements from senior Ministers, regulators and other officials, opposition speakers and senior opinion-formers in industry and interest groups. Events regularly receive prominent coverage in the national and trade press.

Booking arrangements: To book places, please use our online booking form.

Once submitted, this will be taken as a confirmed booking and will be subject to our terms and conditions below.

Please pay in advance by credit card on 01344 864796. If advance credit card payment is not possible, please let me know and we may be able to make other arrangements.

Options and charges are as follows:

  • Places at SEND reform: implementation, support and widening provision (including refreshments and PDF copy of the transcripts) are £190 plus VAT;
  • Concessionary rate places for small charities, unfunded individuals and those in similar circumstances are £80 plus VAT. Please be sure to apply for this at the time of booking.

For those who cannot attend:

  • Copies of the briefing document, including full transcripts of all speeches and the questions and comments sessions and further articles from interested parties, will be available approximately 10 days after the event for £95 plus VAT;
  • Concessionary rate: £50 plus VAT.

If you find the charge for places a barrier to attending, please let me know as concessionary and complimentary places are made available in certain circumstances (but do be advised that this typically applies to individual service users or carers, full-time students, people between jobs or who are fully retired with no paid work, and representatives of small charities – not businesses, individuals funded by an organisation, or larger charities/not-for-profit companies). Please note terms and conditions below (including cancellation charges).

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Introducing… Grahame Whitfield

From the very beginning, the DRF blog has include a space for brief biographical and contact details to be listed. The People section is open to everyone and anyone interested in disability research.

Our most recent addition is:

Grahame Whitfield: gwhitfield1@sheffield.ac.uk – PhD Student, School of Health and Associated Research (ScHARR), University of Sheffield, UK.  After several years working in the UK Civil Service on disability policy and research, Grahame is now a PhD student.  His Project, funded by the NIHR School of Public Health Research, will focus on developing an understanding of how personalisation in health and social care for older disabled people – in particular of moves to deliver Choice and Control in practice – are being responded to by professionals and people and how these can be improved to improve health and social outcomes. Click here for profile.

If you’d like to have your biographical/contact details listed in the People section all it takes is an email to Rebecca Mallett (r.mallett@shu.ac.uk)