DRF News

Event: Diagnosis in educational and psychological practice: An interdisciplinary conversation (Jan 2014: Sheffield)

You are invited to register for an exciting, cross-disciplinary one-day conference:

Diagnosis in educational and psychological practice: an interdisciplinary conversation

…which will be held at The University of Sheffield on Monday 12th January 2015, 9:30am – 4:30pm.

The event has been organised through collaboration between Tony Williams (Educational Psychology), Harriet Cameron (Specialist Teaching in SpLD/ Dyslexia) and Alex Young (Clinical Psychology), and as such it brings together a range of perspectives on the uses and abuses of diagnosis from related, but often very separate fields of practice in education and psychology.

The main purpose of this event is to provide a critical space for attendees to explore some of the different ways in which diagnosis is experienced, to reflect upon the medicalisation of labelling in education and psychology, and to critically interrogate the assumptions they might have in this area. Through these conversations, it is hoped that we will address some of the challenges and paradoxes we face around medicalisation in the practice of specialist teaching and psychology, and that we will leave the conference with a greater awareness of the roles we play in (re)producing particular concepts of difference and difficulty.

If you are a specialist teacher, a mental health specialist, a researcher in a related field, a user of specialist SpLD or mental health services, an educational psychologist, a student in a related discipline, a clinical psychologist, a needs assessor, or a disability advisor, this conference is likely to be of interest to you.

The draft programme is attached. Precise titles for talks and workshops will be confirmed nearer the time.

To book your place, please go to http://onlineshop.shef.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=10&catid=119&prodid=333

You will need the password ‘diagnosis’ when purchasing your ticket. The tickets should be available now, but please try a little later if you find they are not yet up. There may be a short delay.

The cost is £20/ £15 concessions, and includes refreshments and lunch. The venue is fully accessible. Please let us know if you have any additional requirements.

We expect this event to be very popular, so if you would like to attend, please book your place as soon as possible.

For more information: contact Harriet Cameron on h.cameron@sheffield.ac.uk

 

Advertisements
DRF News

Reminder: DRF Seminar #2 – Wednesday, 27th Nov 2013: 2pm-4pm (at SHU)

The DRF Seminar Schedule 2013-2014 continues next Wednesday with Kate Macdonald reading First World War fiction for tales of impairment.  All are welcome. We are looking forward to some fascinating discussions.

Seminar #2. Wednesday, 27th November 2013: 2pm-4pm – Arundel 10212 (SHU)

Kate Macdonald (Ghent University, Belgium & Visiting Research Fellow at King’s College London, UK)

Reading First World War Fiction for Tales of Impairment

Abstract: This paper describes preliminary findings from my research for the CENDARI project at King’s College London, for which I’m a visiting research fellow. I’m reading fiction published during or shortly after the First World War to collect images and descriptions of the impaired body. I’m looking for the war-wounded ex-soldier and also for the man who could not serve due to physical impairment caused by congenital conditions, disease or industrial injury, because my hypothesis is that some kinds of disability were considered at this time to be more deserving than others. I will be using a cross-disciplinary approach to consider how these depictions were used, using my reading of historical assessment, disability studies theory, and literary analysis. My sources are from popular culture, since my wider project is on the depiction of the impaired body in popular culture, 1914-1939. Thus I am not looking at Lady Chatterley’s Lover or Mrs Dalloway, but at serialised magazine fiction, novels in reprint series, and advertisements. ‘Popular fiction has long been understood as having the potential to make visible the intangible nature of discursive power, cultural values – especially at moments of social transition – and emerging imaginative constructs that enable popular understandings of crisis and desire’ (Moody 2008).

Bio: Kate Macdonald teaches British literature and literary history at Ghent University, Belgium, and is a specialist in British literary history of the early twentieth century. She is the leading scholarly authority on John Buchan, and has published widely on middlebrow literary culture and book history. She is the series editor, with Ann Rea, for the Literary Texts and the Popular Marketplace monograph series for Pickering & Chatto, and a Visiting Research Fellow at the Department of Digital Humanities at King’s College London. She podcasts at www.reallylikethisbook.com, and is a member of the Vulpes Libris book blogging collective at http://vulpeslibris.wordpress.com/.

Venue: This seminar will be held in the Arundel Building, 122 Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB. For a map of City Campus click here.

For more info on upcoming DRF events, click here.

…and don’t forget, registration and abstract submissions are now open for Normalcy 2014.

DRF News

Event: ‘Driving Under the Influence: Impairment Rhetoric in Social Justice Education’ ~ Tanya Titchkosky (Nov, 2013: Toronto)

The Humanities, Social Sciences & Social Justice Education (HSSSJE) Brown Bag 2013/14 Speakers Series presents…

‘Driving Under the Influence: Impairment Rhetoric in Social Justice Education’

~ Tanya Titchkosky

 

Date (Venue): Wednesday, 20th November: 12:30-1:30pm (Room 12-274, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto, 252 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 1V6)

Summary: Color blind, deaf to the call of justice, suffering from historical amnesia; blind to structural oppression, limping under the weight of inequality, an amputated self, crazy; subject to colonial aphasia, nothing but a deformed autonomy made to fit a crippled economy; devastatingly disabled. What compels this impairment rhetoric? Obviously, such rhetoric is steeped in able-ism and includes disability as a devalued and excludable type. Still, is there something not so obvious that we should notice here?

This talk explores social justice education’s need to drive itself forward under the influence of impairment rhetoric, so as to reveal a few of the lessons concealed in this need. These lessons touch upon the production of the nature/culture divide accomplished through disability configured as the boundary of peoples’ potential, as this relates to an unexamined conception of the human steeped in its own inhumanity. I will end this talk by showing how a non-rhetorical relation to impairment rhetoric offers an imaginative way to re-approach social justice issues.

Bio: Tanya Titchkosky is an Associate Professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. Tanya’s publications include, The Question of Access: Disability, Space, Meaning (2011); Reading and Writing Disability Differently: The Textured Life of Embodiment (2007); Disability, Self and Society (2003) as well as a reader with co-editor Rod Michalko, Rethinking Normalcy (2009). Tanya’s current work explores disability narrative in order to reveal the interpretive edges of the meaning of human with a particular focus on human rights, immigration and education policy, epigenetic discourse, and WHO mental health projects.

Info: Please join us, all welcome. For more information please contact Cindy Sinclair, c.sinclair@utoronto.ca or visit http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/hsssje//index.html