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2017 PhD Scholarship Programme: UNSW Australia

UNSW Australia is seeking applicants for the 2017 Scientia PhD Scholarship Programme

Research Area of Interest: Knowledge Exchange – Social Policy, Government and Health Policy – Social and Educational Inclusion and Disability

Specific Topic Area:  People with cognitive disability and complex support needs – voices in policy and practice

Description of the proposed project: This project will be an empirical inquiry into the experiences of people with cognitive disability who experience intense social disadvantage and connected with mental health issues, substance misuse, homelessness and/or contact with the criminal justice system. The project captures the voices of this group via innovative strategies to ensure the challenges they encounter are understood in multiple arenas of social care.

More information on the scheme and the application process is available via the following link: https://www.arts.unsw.edu.au/research/research-culture/scientia-fellowships-scholarships/2017-scientia-scholarships/

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Reminder: Next DRF Seminar – Weds. 10th December 2014: 10am-12pm

Details for the next DRF seminar are below. All welcome. And if you’d like to present at an upcoming seminar, please do let us know – available slots can be seen here.

Wednesday 10th December, 10am-12pm, Room 100009 (Arundel Building, Sheffield Hallam University)

Slot 1: Joanna Baker-Rogers: Asperger Syndrome – experiencing the phenomenon of friendship (Sheffield Hallam University, UK)

Abstract: As the mother of a son with the label of Asperger Syndrome (AS), I have observed my son enjoying friendships with peers both on the autism spectrum and non-disabled. These observations would appear to challenge the diagnostic view that persons with AS do not enjoy friendship. Instead they prefer solitary activities and being alone. This conceptualisation of the autism spectrum embodies the medical model of disability and in-particular the Triad of Impairments (Wing 1995). The literature is dominated by understandings of friendship of non-disabled people (O’Dell, Bertildotter Rosqvist and Brownlow (2013). There is little consideration of potential autistic friendships from a social model of disability perspective. Instead the focus is on the failure of persons with AS to aspire to and maintain friendships with the aim of improving themselves to experience friendship from a non-disabled perspective.  I have come to question whether concepts of friendship are being imposed upon persons with AS that have little meaning for them, are disabling and embody the concepts of normalcy (Abberley 1991) and ableism (Campbell 2012).

The medical model of disability view of persons with AS not being interested in friendship needs to be problematised. This presentation of my research critiques these misconceptions that have emerged as a result of social barriers in society. My research aims to capture the different and valid lived experience of friendship for persons with AS that challenges the conceptualisation of the autism spectrum as a tragedy for the individual and their family.

Slot 2: Chris Hill: Special School Sporting Experiences: Listening to Student Researchers Labelled with Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties (Sheffield Hallam University, UK)

Abstract: TBC.

DRF News

Pacific Rim International Conference (May, 2015: Hawaii, USA)

from… the organisers of the Pacific Rim International Conference (May, 2015: Hawaii, USA)

 

“For our 31st edition, Pac Rim is merging and partnering with another conference, so there is sure to be plenty of surprises! 

The Pacific Rim International Conference, considered one of the most ‘diverse gatherings’ in the world, encourages and respects voices from “diverse” perspective across numerous areas, including: voices from persons representing all disability areas; experiences of family members and supporters across all disability and diversity areas; responsiveness to diverse cultural and language differences; evidence of researchers and academics studying diversity and disability; stories of persons providing powerful lessons; examples of program providers, and; action plans to meet human and social needs in a globalized world.

In 2015, new topic areas will promote thoughtful discussion and suggest new ways to integrate education, technology, advocacy, activism and interdisciplinary research. We all strive to strengthen communities and enhance the lives of all human beings. Together, we can harness the tremendous synergy generated by the intermingling and cross-fertilization of diverse perspectives, and ‘spread the word’ as we continue our professional and personal life journey.

Take your first steps to the islands by visiting the website: www.pacrim.hawaii.edu.

We welcome your ideas, suggestions and enthusiasm. Then join us in Waikiki, Hawaii, May 18 & 19, 2015.”

 

DRF News

Minimising Restrictive Practices in Health and Social Care ‘Safe Restraint’ Project – Consultancy Brief September 2014

[Posted on behalf of Disability Sheffield].

Disability Sheffield is a user led organisation, run and controlled by disabled people. We promote independent living for disabled people in Sheffield. By independent living we mean that disabled people have the same freedom and rights to exercise choice and control over their own lives as any other person

As part of Sheffield Individual Employer & PA Development Group and in partnership with Active Independence, Doncaster, we are running a project funded by Skills for Care under their ‘innovative workforce development fund. This project focuses on raising the issues of minimising the use of restrictive practices in Health and Social Care.

Overview of the project

Recent key documents jointly issued by Skills for Care and Skills for Health on Workforce Development Guidance for Employers seeking to minimise the use of Restrictive Practices in Health and Social Care sets out a clear Framework to be used by all (Skills for Care & Skills for Health 2014).

The focus of the project is to start to develop this conversation with individual employers and their Personal Assistants (PAs) by informing employers of the framework and gaining knowledge of how and when to use it as well as looking at developing good practice resources for PAs. Part of developing the conversation means working with representatives of the statutory services to inform and make changes to their practices. The Common Core Principles of self-directed support are about ensuring those people employing their own staff receive personalised and practical support to promote their health & well-being in ways which respect and promote their independence. Minimisation of restrictive practice plays a key part in this.

This project will develop a range of resources that are accessible in format which target employers in receipt of a Direct Payment and those who self-fund. The information raising action will then lead onto following up with developing a range of co-produced resources and events which will raise the profile of the issue and also inform wider implementation as there will be experts through experience informing future learning and practice. Opportunities already exist through current activity that enable a range of communication routes to be used to enable engagement with some harder to reach groups e.g. younger employers and those going through transition.

Project Outputs and Outcomes

By the end of the project, it is intended that a number of key outputs will have been delivered:

  • A general easy read flyer raising the issue & distributed to Individual Employers;
  • Contact with the widest range of employers who might be interested in progressing the project;
  • 3 separate co-produced questionnaires for statutory staff, individual employers & PAs which will provide information on existing practice, help develop a training needs analysis tool and provide a method for delivery to inform future practice;
  • Piloted sessions for individual employers and PAs on how to have the conversation that ‘Recognises the values and idiosyncrasies of the employer ‘, ‘What restrictive practices means’ and ‘Best support / interventions within a social context reflecting the social model of disability’; and
  • Information on sign posting to other support and advice.

It is intended that the project will involve obtaining feedback from up to 40 statutory staff (Social workers and clinical staff ), 20 Individual employers and 20 Personal Assistants. In addition in Sheffield Mentors / Coaches will have been trained to have the discussion and the topic will have been raised at the monthly employer drop in sessions. In Doncaster the topic will have been raised at the regular PA peer support group meetings.

It is intended that the project will result in an increased awareness and development of good practice within Sheffield and Doncaster with regards to appropriate restrictive practice. Alongside this, individual employers, PAs and practitioner will have access during the project and beyond to resource and training information developed during the project to support and develop their practice within this area.

Impact will be measured by the number of people who have been reached and the extent to which awareness has been raised; numbers attending the training sessions and responses to evaluation forms asking people how useful they found the training and the changes they plan to make to their practice.

Delivering the project

We are looking for a consultant to deliver an evaluation of this project. We are content for this to be a freelance/self-employed individual/team or an individual /team based within an institution.

This is a time-limited project and we are therefore looking for someone/a team who would be able to start work immediately. The work needs to be completed by 15th may 2015. There is up to £5,000 (inclusive of VAT if applicable) available for this piece of work.

Skills and knowledge

This is a short term consultancy and the consultant should have an excellent knowledge about the issues that impact on disabled people. We expect the consultant to:

  • Have knowledge of workforce development and innovation in the adult social care sector;
  • Have expertise in both process and impact evaluation – and of both quantitative and qualitative methods;
  • Have knowledge of research governance procedures in the social care sector;
  • Demonstrate their ability (and provide an undertaking) to complete the project within the specified time.
  • Demonstrate their ability to produce work to the highest standards – in particular the final report and project presentation
  • Have in place appropriate CRB/DBS disclosures and safeguarding policies and relevant professional standards/memberships; and
  • Have excellent communication skills and willingness to communicate with the project steering group throughout the course of this consultancy.

The main key tasks of this brief drawing on the practice and learning in Sheffield and Doncaster are to:

  • Provide an evaluation of the delivery of this project, both in terms of the delivery of project outputs and whether (and the extent to which) the project met its intended objectives;
  • Produce a short accessible report and standalone summary, suitable for Skills for Care publication; and
  • Deliver a presentation of key findings and recommendations for future learning and to inform national practice.

Registering your interest

If you are interested in delivering this project please register your interest by submitting a maximum 4 sides of A4 outlining your suitability for this role including your experience and skills and a brief summary of how you would propose to undertake the work, including timings. Additional information (e.g. Brief CVs, lists of relevant projects, testimonials etc.) can be attached.

Please send your expression of interest by 9am on Wednesday 8th October 2014 to: Emily Morton at Emily.morton@disabilitysheffield.org.uk

If you require this information in an alternative format please contact Emily at the above e-mail address or on Sheffield 0114 2536750

Consultancy Arrangements

  • The successful Consultant is expected to sign a contractual agreement prior to commencing work on the project and have relevant self-employed status and insurance cover.
  • The work shall be carried out in the Consultant’s offices and all expenses incurred in carrying out the work required by the brief shall be the responsibility of the Consultant unless otherwise agreed in writing.
  • The Consultant shall treat as confidential any information obtained in the course of the work.

 

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Event: Understanding and Communicating Pain: An Interdisciplinary Approach (May 2014: Durham, UK)

Event: Understanding and Communicating Pain: An Interdisciplinary Approach

Date/Venue:

  • 07 May 2014, 6.00 – 8.00pm Calman Learning Centre, Durham University, UK
  • 08 May 2014, 9.00 – 3.00pm, Wolfson Research Institute, Durham University, UK

Description:

Pain is not just an individual physical or emotional experience. The ways in which it is represented and imagined, and the knowledges, beliefs and values that surround it, have a direct effect on how it is experienced and managed by individuals, families and social groups. This event takes an interdisciplinary look at how pain is caused, experienced, understood and communicated exploring the following questions:

  • How do different cultural and sub-cultural groups deal with pain: what kinds of beliefs and values do they have about pain; what kinds of rituals and forms of therapy do they employ in managing it; how do they communicate it? What can we learn from diverse cultural and historial perspectives on pain?
  • Pain is represented in the arts in multiple ways: as something to be feared and conquered; as something that offers fascination and drama. What kinds of images of pain do we draw on in the UK? How can images of pain in the visual and literary arts affect people’s experiences of pain and our strategies for managing it?
  • How do beliefs and ideas about pain affect its representation as a social problem, for example in relation to policies providing access to health and social services? What kinds of scientific evidence are required in demonstrating the efficacy of pain management therapies? How do dominant societal ideas about pain affect social and economic policies relating to worklessness and benefits?
  • What is the science behind pain and its perception by people and how is this linked  to the social and psychological questions? What is is the basis for the analgesic “placebo” effect? What is the link between pain and addiction/reward?  What is the basis of pain experience changes as we age?
  • Why are numbers of prescriptions for analgesics excessively higher (5-fold in some cases) in Teesside than the rest of the country? (http://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news/local-news/teesside-pcts-spend-most-painkillers-3679095)

Durham University’s Institute of Advanced Study and Wolfson Research Institute for Health and Wellbeing, in collaboration with the Durham Forum for Health, will explore these questions in these two events; firstly a public talk, followed by a full day workshop.

07 May: An evening public event centred on a panel discussion with three speakers, addressing the questions above and inviting contributions from a public audience. 

  • Chair: Professor: Professor Jane Macnaughton
  • Dr Clare Roques: Is Pain a Problem to be Fixed? An International Perspective
  • Dr Suzannah Biernoff: Iconographies of pain and stoicism
  • Dr Rachael Gooberman-Hill: Research into pain: ethnographic and clinical perspectives

 08 May: A one-day workshop, co-hosted by the University’s Biophysical Sciences Institute, aimed at initiating an interdisciplinary project on pain.

REGISTRATION IS ESSENTIAL; BOOK YOUR PLACE NOW – More information can also be found here.

DRF News

Event: Sexuality Summer School 2014 (26th-30th May: Manchester, UK) @SSS_Manchester

Event: Sexuality Summer School 2014 – 3 Public Lectures (free and all welcome)

Dates: 26th – 30th May 2014

Programme: please find detailed below.

  • Monday 26 May – 12pm-2pm: Professor Jasbir Puar (Rutgers) ‘A Body with New Organs: Becoming Trans, Becoming Disabled’

Venue: Manchester Museum, Oxford Rd, Kanaris LT (1st Floor)

In this paper Puar historically situates the most current intersectional flavors of the day, “trans” and “disabled,” through their emergence as the latest newcomers to the intersectional fray.  She looks at how their parallel yet rarely intersecting epistemological constructs—both come into being, or becoming, in the early 90s in the academy as well as in broader political terms and movements—require exceptionalizing both the trans body and the disabled body in order to convert the debility of a non-normative body into a form of social and cultural capacity, whether located in state recognition, identity politic formations, market economies, the medical industrial complex, or subject positioning.

  • Tuesday 27 May 4pm-6pm: Professor Valerie Traub (University of Michigan and Simon Visiting Professor, Manchester) ‘Anatomy, Cartography, and the Prehistory of Normality’

Venue: John Casken Lecture Theatre, Martin Harris Centre, Oxford Rd, University of Manchester. Sponsored by EAC, SEXGEN and Pride. Followed by wine reception at Contact Theatre.

During the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, European cartographers and anatomists developed novel strategies for representing the diversity of human bodies in their atlases of the world and its inhabitants. Tracking their implicit taxonomies of gender, sexuality, race, and class, Valerie Traub speculates on the effects of their strategies on the historical emergence of the concept of “the normal.”

  • Thursday 29 May – 5pm-7om: Public Lecture by Professor Mary Bryson (University of British Columbia) and Chase Joynt (Chicago) ‘ Biopolitics Under the Skin: Relating Cancer Narratives – An Archive of the ‘Talking Dead’?’

Venue: John Casken Lecture Theatre, Martin Harris Centre, University of Manchester. Followed by wine reception at Kro.

This talk situates the Cancer’s Margins project (www.lgbtcancer.ca) and its preliminary findings in an overview of feminist, postcolonial, and queer biopolitical scholarship. concerning anatomy, pathographies, embodiment, chronicity and new analytic modes of technomaterialism that have foregrounded and articulated complex and discontinuous assemblages that twist, warp and reimagine modernity’s bedrock binaries, including ‘alive<>dead’, ‘real <>fiction’, ‘subject<>object’, ‘now<>then’ and so on. This lecture will engage with the opportunity, and perhaps, the obligation, to think critically about the move to delimit historically, and as a gesture to an entirely different futurity, the time when a biopolitics of embodied humanism was organized in a relation of explicit politicization.

 

The Sexuality Summer School is sponsored this year by the Faculty of Humanities; Cornerhouse; Contact; Manchester Pride; Screen; Science, Stroke, Art 2014; and SEXGEN.

For more information about the Sexuality Summer School, including details of previous events, go to sexualitysummerschool.wordpress.com, email us and get on the mailing list at sexualitysummerschool@gmail.com, find Sexuality Summer School on Facebook or tweet us @SSS_Manchester.

DRF News

Event: Manchester Centre for Youth Studies Launch (June, 2014: UK)

Event: Manchester Centre for Youth Studies Launch – ‘Contesting Youth in the UK – Key Challenges and Agendas’

Date: Thursday 26th June 2014

Venue: Geoffrey Manton Building, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK (further details and directions to the venue can be found at www.hssr.mmu.ac.uk/mcys/)

Description: to mark the launch of the Manchester Centre for Youth Studies (MCYS), MMU are hosting a one day free event titled ‘Contesting Youth in the UK – Key Challenges and Agendas’ on Thursday 26th June 2014, in the Geoffrey Manton Building, Manchester Metropolitan University. This exciting and informative event will be used as a means to show-case work undertaken by colleagues at MMU that identifies the key challenges and agendas for research in this field. The event will bring together MYCS researchers, community groups, policymakers and practitioners working with young people, and local youth in a dialogue about how a new inter-disciplinary research centre can best engage with and address the challenges facing young people today.

The programme of events for Thursday 26th June can be found below.

For more information please contact: Dr Hannah Smithson: Co-Director MCYS (e mail: h.l.smithson@mmu.ac.uk)

Register for the event on Eventbrite here.

Programme for the Day

9.00 – 9.45 am: Registration

10.00 – 10.30 am: Welcome address

10.30 – 11.30 am: Keynote address- Helen Donohoe, Director of Research and Policy for ‘Action for Children’

11.45 – 12.30 pm: MMU Research ‘Spotlight’ Panel One

12.30 – 1.30 pm: Lunch (provided)

1.30 – 2.30 pm: Roundtable Session, discussants include:

  • Tony Lloyd – Greater Manchester’s Police Crime Commissioner (young people and crime)
  • Neil Mcinroy – CEO Centre for Local Economic Strategies (youth unemployment)
  • Dr Jenny Slater – Lecturer in Disability Studies, Sheffield Hallam University (young people’s disability rights)
  • Helen McAndrew – Head of Manchester Secondary Pupil Referral Units (young people and education)
  • Sufiya Ahmed – Author (gender and diversity)

2.45 – 3.30 pm: MMU Research ‘Spotlight’ Panel Two

3.30 – 4.00 pm: Open discussion

4.30 pm onwards: Book launch and drinks reception – Dr Melanie Tebbutt: Being Boys: Youth, Leisure and Identity in the Inter-war years, Manchester University Press.

DRF News

Job Opp: Professor/Reader in Education (Sheffield, UK)

Fancy being a Professor/Reader in Education (in the Sheffield Institute of Education, Faculty of Development and Society, Sheffield Hallam University, UK)

  • Professor – £Competitive + benefits
  • Reader – £47,787 to £55,375 + benefits

Established in 2013 and already amongst the largest providers of teacher training in the UK, the Sheffield Institute of Education (SIoE) is home to over 5,000 undergraduate and postgraduate students and more than 160 dedicated staff. Our high impact research spans education from the early years of life into adulthood and we have plans in place to grow our profile even further.

As Professor/Reader in Education, you’ll be a key figurehead at the University, with a crucial contribution to make to the research leadership group within the Sheffield Institute of Education. Here, your challenge will be to provide both academic and strategic direction for research across some of our most pressing areas, such as education policy and curriculum and pedagogy in education.  [The Institute also houses a wide-range of fascinating and innovative work on inclusion, disability and autism.]

Applying your exceptional vision, creativity and leadership skills where they matter most, this is an opportunity to continue your track record of enhancing the quality of research, maximising its impact on a global scale, and growing an existing portfolio of high profile research funding.

Enjoying real breadth and potential, we’re looking for an inspirational leader with a passion for education and the power it has to engender positive social change. With a strong research profile behind you, it’s also important that you can demonstrate an ability to influence and develop both colleagues and students. Able to see the bigger picture as well as the detail, your success will shine through the strategic development of our research programmes.

Join us at this exciting time in our development and we will go above and beyond to encourage and support your original ideas and professional ambitions.

To learn more or apply visit www.shu.ac.uk/jobs

Closing date: 17 April 2014.

Also click here.

Children, Familes and Young People, Critical Theory, DRF News, Events and Conferences, Media and Culture

Reminder: Next DRF Seminar – Thurs. 13th Mar (2pm-4pm)

When: Thursday, 13th March 2014: 2pm-4pm – Arundel 10111 (SHU)

Where: Arundel Room 10111 (SHU) [the Arundel Building = 122 Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB.  For a map of City Campus click here.]

Everyone welcome!

Slot 1: Cassie Ogden (Univ. of Chester, UK): Troubling Borders with Bodies that Seep: an critical sociological exploration into children’s experiences of leaky realities and how we can learn to accept our bodies in all its leaky glory.

Slot 2: Jenny Slater (SHU): School Toilet Chat: Exploring how Issues of Space, Access, Embodiment, Identity and ‘Normal’ Function in the the Lives of Young People

For George (2011), toilets are “the big necessity”; a mundane part of life that, until absent or inadequate, we rarely pay attention. One place these facilities are consistently found to be inadequate are in schools (Burton, 2013, Greed, 2010). Vernon, Lundblad and Hellstrom (2003) reported that 62% of boys and 35% of in the UK avoided using toilets whilst at school (citing reasons of lack of hygiene, privacy and bullying); and in 2013, a study in Scotland similarly highlighted the poor state of school toilet (Burton, 2013). Here I seek feedback on a proposal which hopes to utilise theorisations of disability, queer and fat activists and academics, to think hard about school toilets as transdisciplinary spaces to explore how issues of space, access, embodiment and normal function in the lives of young people.

 

DRF News

Job Opp: Lecturing Jobs at Liverpool Hope

Liverpool Hope University is currently advertising two Disability Studies-related jobs: more information can be found on the following links.

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Education SEN & Disability –  http://www.hope.ac.uk/jobs/lslecturerineducationsendisability/

Post Doctoral Teaching Fellow in Education (Four Posts Available) – http://www.hope.ac.uk/jobs/postdoctoralteachingfellowineducation-2aeds/