DRF News

Celebrating Recent PhD Success by DRF Members

Today we are celebrating recent PhD successes by DRF Members, and giving a shout out to their excellent work. 

A founding memeber of the DRF – Dr Tabby Collingbourne (University of Sheffield). Thesis: “Realising Disability Rights?” –  online at http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/3904/

A critical political discourse analysis of implementation in England of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, focusing on socio-economic rights set out under Article 19, the right to live independently and be included in the community.

Dr Jenny Slater (Manchester Metropolitan University). Thesis: “Constructions, Perceptions and Expectations of Being Disabled and Young: A Critical Disability Perspective”

Now a Lecturer in Education and Disability Studies at Sheffield Hallam University (j.slater@shu.ac.uk), you can read more about Jenny’s research in the following publications:

  • Slater, J. (2012) ‘Youth for sale: Using critical disability perspectives to examine the embodiment of ‘youth’ Societies 2:3, pp.195-209.
  • Slater, J. (forthcoming 2013) ‘Research with dis/abled youth: taking a critical disability, ‘critically young’ positionality’. In K. Runswick-Cole and T. Curran (eds.), Disabled Children’s Childhood Studies: Critical Approaches in a Global Context. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
  • Slater, J. (forthcoming 2013) ‘Playing grown-up: using critical disability perspectives to rethink youth’. In A. Azzopardi (ed.), Youth: Responding to Lives – An International Handbook. Rotterdam: Sense Publications.

Congratulations both.

If you, or a researcher you know, would like to celebrate PhD success in this way – let us know.

DRF News

CCDS Event: ‘Mad in Court: Mentally Disabled Pro Se Litigants and the Complex Embodiment of Mind’ (October 2012, UK)

Event: Centre for Culture & Disability Studies (CCDS) Research Seminar 

Date: Weds. 3rd October 2012: 2.15pm-3.45pm ~ Venue: Eden, 109, Liverpool Hope University, UK. 

Brief Description:

Mad in Court: Mentally Disabled Pro Se Litigants and the Complex Embodiment of Mind

~ Prof. Catherine Prendergast (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA)

Despite the recent increase in self-advocacy by people who are mentally impaired, the legal realm is still considered a risky area for self-representation, as though “nothing about us without us” should stop at the courthouse door. To complicate this notion, Catherine Prendergast presents two cases that demonstrate both the persuasive force and jurisprudential significance of mentally impaired pro se litigation. The contention is that these litigants offer something akin to Tobin Siebers’s notion of “complex embodiment” in the sense that they lend concrete form to the oppressive and flattening abstraction of mental illness. They also provide first-hand accounts of the barriers that hamper inmate efforts to engage in self-expression and advocacy. These accounts question the mind-body dualism implied in the very notion of embodiment.

Catherine Prendergast is Professor of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she teaches courses in disability studies, rhetoric, and writing. Her articles on the subject of mental impairment have appeared in SAQ: South Atlantic Quarterly, College English, and The Disability Studies Reader (3rd edition). She has co-edited (with Elizabeth Donaldson) a special issue of the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies on the topic of Representing Disability and Emotion.

For further information from the organisers, please contact: Dr. David Bolt: boltd@hope.ac.uk