DRF News

CFP: Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane: 3rd International Conference

Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane: 3rd International Conference

This Year’s Theme: ‘Cripping the norm’

Dates: 26th- 27th June 2012

Where: University of Chester

Keynote confirmed: Dr James Overboe (Associate Professor, Wilfrid Lauier University, Canada) – for details click here; China Mills – – for details click here.   Others TBC.

Jointly-hosted by University of Chester in association with Critical Disability Studies (Manchester Metropolitan University) (MMU) and the Disability Research Forum (Sheffield Hallam University), this conference is now calling for papers.

This 3rd international conference builds on the success of the Normalcy2010 and Normalcy2011 conferences held in Manchester and seeks, again, to bring together an international group of disability studies researchers. Our conference moves to the beautiful Cathedral town of Chester (located on the border of England and Wales).

The call for papers sought contributions around the following areas:

  • exploring the cultural and political production of normalcy
  • addressing our obsession with reason and rationality
  • connecting ableism with other hegemonies including heterosexism, racism and ageism
  • analysing the barriers and possibilities of the mundane and extraordinary
  • deconstructing new pathologies and ‘abnormalities’
  • celebrating deviations from the norm
  • affirming crip identities and ways of living

Abstracts should be no longer than 300 words and should be sent to normalcy2012@hotmail.co.uk no later than… the Extended Deadline Now: 15th May 2012.

Our aim is for this conference to be as inclusive as possible.  We welcome activists, undergraduate and postgraduate students, practitioners and academics to join us. In the spirit of an eco-friendly conference, registered delegates will be sent an e-pack. Details of accommodation near the venue will also be sent to delegates.

This year, to cover costs of refreshment and lunches, we will be charging a flat rate of £75 per delegate. Free registration is still available however for full time students and people currently unemployed. Details of online registration to follow.

Please check out the normalcy2012 website for further details when they emerge: http://normalcy2012.tumblr.com/

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DRF News

Details of next DRF Seminar ~ November 2011 (Sheffield, UK)

DRF Seminar Series: Seminar #2

Date/Time: 16th November 2011 (Weds) 2pm-4pm 

Venue: Room 10111 in the Arundel Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University (More information on the venue can be found here.)

  • Manny Madriaga (Sheffield Hallam University): Is seeking the disabled person voice really necessary in empancipatory research?

Abstract: This paper calls for a renewed thinking on emancipatory research when seeking the disabled student ‘voice’ in the arena of higher education.  Drawing on the work of critical race theory, particularly whiteness, disability studies in the United Kingdom recently has been foregrounding the social processes of normalcy.  Normalcy highlights the (re)production of disability in everyday life.  This, of course, raises uncomfortable questions, particularly on the significance of seeking the voice of disabled people. These questions are explored here, reflecting on research that encompassed stories of university support staff and their support of disabled students.

  • Erin Pritchard (Department of Geography, University of Newcastle): Space and time strategies of dwarfs in public space: Body size and rights of access to the built environment

Abstract: In this paper, I aim to explore the experiences of women dwarfs and their encounters with others within the built environment and how space and time affect their experiences and right to access spaces. I argue that a dwarf’s right to access different spaces is affected by both social and spatial barriers which occur during different times and within different spaces. It is argued within this paper that negotiations of everyday spaces – including avoidance due to fear of name-calling – affect a person’s basic rights. More specifically, attention is drawn to the reasons why dwarfs avoid certain areas because of their disability (which in this case is their size) and the ways they respond to particular situations within these spaces. I look at both how the built environment can be inaccessible and also how an attitudinal environment can create inaccessible spaces. Drawing upon recent work by Rosemary Garland Thomson (2011) I intend to show how having a small body results in people becoming ‘misfits’ within society through not fitting the norm both socially and spatially and therefore causing exclusion in various public spaces. This work draws upon ongoing qualitative research with women dwarfs in order to examine their social and spatial experiences and how they negotiate the built environment. The findings from this paper suggest that dwarfs do negotiate the built environment differently often though avoidance of particular spaces and this therefore limits their rights to access spaces.

Next Seminar: 6th December 2011 (Tues) 12pm-2pm

Harriet Cooper (Birkbeck College, University of London): Othering and Ordinariness in Representations of the Physically Impaired Child in Anglo-American Culture in the period 1870-1911

Jenny Slater (Department of Psychology, Manchester Metropolitan University): Time travelling with young disabled people: developing a queer, crip, critically young, futurist methodology

There are still slots available in early 2012, so if you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar please do get in touch.  Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book on which you’d like to facilitate discussion.  Please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk

DRF News

Reminder: DRF Seminar Series 2011-12 starts 11th October (Sheffield, UK)

DRF Seminar Series : Seminar #1

Date/Time: 11th October 2011 (Tues) 1pm-3pm 

Slot 1: Jayne Sellick (Department of Geography, University of Durham): The temporality of disabled identities: Examples from participatory work

Abstract: This paper explores the role of time and temporalities in the past and present experiences of participants, who as part of the project self-defined with a disabled identity. Drawing from a Participatory Action Research (P.A.R) agenda, stories relating to disability, impairment, health, chronic pain and illness were recalled. Using empirical examples I will explore the temporality of these experiences by thinking through the (non)representational.

Slot 2: Nick Hodge (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University): Misreading Arthur: Ableism at work in psychoanalysis and counselling

Abstract: Highly developed levels of reflection and self awareness by therapists and counsellors and the acceptance, and celebration, of the personal position of the client are foundational principles of counselling practice. It would be expected, therefore, that the counselling room might be the one space that would transcend the spectres of ableism (Campbell, 2009). However, the experiences of disabled people suggest that even here ableism continues to assert its insidious and invasive control (Reeve, 2000). This paper, by critiquing a particular account of psychotherapy with a disabled child, explores a number of ways in which ableism operates within the counselling room and negotiates the challenge of transversing different epistemic positions (Mackenzie and Leach Scully, 2007). The paper concludes by suggesting that only by watching their watching and reading their readings (Titchkosky, 2007) through an ‘inside-out’ approach (Williams, 1996) might counsellors reveal, confront and exorcise the spectres of ableism.

More information on the venue can be found here.

Next Seminar: 16th November 2011 (Weds) 2pm-4pm

Slot 3: Manny Madriaga (Sheffield Hallam University): Is seeking the disabled person voice really necessary in empancipatory research?

Slot 4: Erin Pritchard (Department of Geography, University of Newcastle): Space and time strategies of dwarfs in public space: Body size and rights of access to the built environment

If you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar please do get in touch.  Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book on which you’d like to facilitate discussion.  Please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk

DRF News, Events and Conferences

Theorizing Normalcy and the Mundane 2011: A Conference Report

[thanks to DRF member Jenny Slater for this conference report]

Theorizing Normalcy and the Mundane: 2nd International conference

(14th-15th September 2011) by Jenny Slater

A memory: It is the night before Theorizing Normalcy and the Mundane 2010. I am in my third year of my undergraduate degree. Tomorrow, I’m going to a proper academic conference, with proper grown-up academics. “What the hell do people wear to conferences?” I ask my friend. “I dunno”, she answers, “maybe a suit or summit?” “you reckon? I don’t have anything like that!” I bumble something together, and hope nobody will notice the hole in the elbow of my ‘smart’ jumper. To my relief/surprise/delight, I didn’t have to worry as my first taste of a keynote speaker at an academic conference was someone whipping off his shirt to make a point about the diversity of bodies; nobody was looking at my holey jumper. Come forward 16 months, I’m now a PhD Student at MMU and fond memories of the 2010 conference meant my hopes for Theorizing Normalcy and the Mundane 2011 were high. It didn’t disappoint.

The conference kicked off with the DRF’s very own Rebecca Mallett warning us of the dangers of ‘buying new normals’ – a sentiment echoed later in the day by Alison Wilde in her paper, ‘Almost Normal?’. Rebecca issued us with a call to arms: we should be troubling normativity, rather than buying into new axes of normativity – a fitting start. The only downside to such a rich programme of speakers is the difficult decisions between parallel sessions. Getting my chairing and speaking duties out of the way early, however, my first choice was made for me and I attended the Child, Youth and Family session. Harriet Cooper was the first to take up Rebecca’s gauntlet, giving a fascinating paper detailing the late nineteenth century’s construction of the ‘normal child’ and using the example of Channel 4’s Born to be Different documentary series to argue the continuing prevalence of normativity in relation to childhood. James Rice followed. James’ paper detailed online message board responses to an interview with a pregnant disabled woman in Iceland and highlighted the normative assumptions that continue to surround conceptions of ‘the family’, stimulating much debate. I rounded the session up, taking inspiration from the recent exploration into commodification by Rebecca Mallett and Katherine Runswick-Cole, considering how the commodification of youth sits alongside socio-cultural constructions of disability. The last word of the session, however, went to John Rees as his call for uniting in struggle against the British Condemn Government (furthered in his brilliantly passionate paper the following day) seemed a fitting end to a thought provoking hour and a half.

Donna Reeve was next in the exciting line-up of all female keynote speakers. The numerous citations of Donna’s work in presentations throughout the conference, as well as in mid- and post-conference chat (especially by doctoral students and those newer to the world of Disability Studies) demonstrated to me the importance of Donna’s work on psycho-emotional disablism and internalized oppression (not that I needed convincing). As usual, Donna failed to disappoint. At the crux of Donna’s argument was that the perception that the impaired body is outside the realms of normativity forces it to centre stage: therefore, we need to halt any impairment/disability dualities and instead include bodies in any theorisation of disability and impairment. A personal highlight for me came in the next session when Cassie Ogden was certainly successful in including ‘bodies’ in her musings. Declaring her love for all things messy (poo was number one, sex number two, but snot and menstrual blood also valid contenders), Cassie exposed the non-leaky body as a farce, highlighting how an expectation to control and hide everyday leakiness means those who do not/cannot/ refuse to mask their leakiness are deemed in possession of a failing body. Donna’s work is important here: Cassie highlighted that normalising, ‘civilising’ processes, such as denying leakiness, bring any (impaired) bodies not meeting this pseudo-norm sharply into focus – with likely consequences of psycho-emotional disablism and internalized oppression.

Rounding off day one was another brilliant keynote, MMU’s Anat Greenstein. Using disability as a lens to build her vision (and fulfil her dream) of opening a democratic school, Anat talked about how disability and the experiences of disabled pupils have built her ideas of democratic pedagogy. Anat gave us a captivating insight into her playful methodology with pupils in a ‘special unit’ of a secondary school to teach us about ‘An Ideal World of Freaks and Unusual Women’. A fitting end to the day.

Day 2 began with fourth and final keynote, Fiona Kumari-Campbell. Fiona’s work on ableism and her call to theorise the ‘able body’ has been particularly influential to my own research (Kumari Campbell, 2009) and Fiona delivered a kick-in-the-balls to all that is ‘reasonable’ by questioning the role of reasonableness and normativity within law. Tying in nicely with the notion of ‘reasonableness’ was Katherine Runswick-Cole’s dismodernist critique of The Big Society later in the day – both alluding to the ableism inherent to the Neoliberal, ‘competent’, ‘capable’ and ‘independent’ citizen. Both papers (along with others) highlighted the timely urgency of questioning what appears as implicit and normal, and therefore acted out in everyday, mundane interactions (with oppressive and potentially fatal consequences) in an increasingly rightist and Neoliberal Britain. Furthermore, the transdiciplinary nature of the conference showed the importance of considering a medley of intersectional identities alongside disability in such debate.

The transdisciplinary feel meant ideas were brought in from wide ranging fields. Andrea Dermondy, for example, speaking from within thanatology spoke of broadening the concept of loss within Disability Studies. On this note, despite a long and packed two days, the last session I attended was possibly one of the most stimulating and enjoyable. Ryan Parrey seemed to effortlessly entwine personal anecdote with dense theory to praise the possibility of rethinking with disabilities emergence. This was followed by Jonathon Harvey arguing the importance of critically including personal narrative in analysis of disability; Liz Ellis introducing Rural Studies and tourism; and Hannah Morgan highlighting the missing disability perspective within Mobility Studies. ‘Mobility’ was the theme of a paper I was particularly sad to miss: disability activist Steve Graby’s ‘Wandering Minds: autism, psychogeography, public space and the ICD’. Having since read Steve’s paper, I now see why it was receiving so much praise: highlighting the pathologisation of behaviour carried out by disabled people that is otherwise considered ‘normal’ in non-disabled people, Steve asks us to consider the psychogeography of disability in order to “seek new and unexplored directions in disability research”. Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane 2011 certainly opened my eyes to numerous new and unexplored directions that will go on to impact upon my own disability research.

Disability, argues Rod Michalko (2010), offers “time  for normalcy, to develop self-understanding […] and this is f*****g cool”. Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane 2011 gave us, an international, transdiciplinary, disruptive bunch of delegates, a time to together explore, critique, wander through and wonder about normalcy and the mundane; to understand the oppressive and exclusionary characteristics of normativity and their manifestation in everyday, mundane actions and ways of being.  I don’t think I’d be alone in saying that this conference was pretty f*****g cool. See you all in Chester for Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane 2012 (details to be announced soon).

  • Kumari Campbell, F. (2009). Contours of Ableism: The Production of Disability and Abledness. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Michalko, R. (2010). What’s Cool About Blindness? Disability Studies Quarterly, 30(3/4), http://www.dsq-sds.org/article/view/1296/1332.
DRF News

Call for Papers: The Normalcy of Difference (AAG, February 2012: New York, USA)

The following session is co-sponsored by the Disability Specialty Group and the Geographical Perspectives on Women (GPOW) Specialty Group, of the Association of American Geographers (AAG).

Call for Papers: The Normalcy of Difference

Event: Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers (AAG), February 24th–28th, New York, 2012

Session Organiser: Jayne Sellick (Durham University)

This session aims to explore the normalcy and/or acceptance of difference by focusing on disability, (mental) health, impairment and chronic illness and pain; however, papers may consider these and/or other embodied or gender differences by addressing conceptual, empirical and/or methodological work.

The normalcy of difference can be framed by drawing from various perspectives and thinking through new embodied geographies of inclusion (Parr 2008), as well as the interdisciplinary nature (Hansen and Philo, 2007) of difference research. These perspectives have drawn from the breadth of bodies represented through “multiple material, lived and imagined differences” (Crooks and Chouinard 2006): 346); while more recent body-object (Bissell 2008) and body-landscape (Macpherson 2010) relations refer to the nonrepresentational.  Papers may focus on:

  • The processes, practices and relationships that exist between, across and through these differences, object(s) and landscapes in space(s) and over time(s);
  • Conceptualising difference by focusing on the (non)representational and thinking through difference as a system, a set of practices, a relationship, kinds of embodiment, interactions with the built environment, frames of mind (Garland-Thomson 2004), an identity politics, an everyday experience, an assemblage;
  • Historiographies of difference and the role of space and time in accepting difference;
  • Methodological approaches to embodied and/or gender difference(s) and the role of participants in the research process;
  • The role of power relations (including those located in gender differences) in acceptance; the space and time of acceptance; the embodied difference of acceptance;
  • The potential of individual and collective action to (re)produce the (in)visibility of embodied difference;
  • The role of borders/boundaries in feminist/empowering approaches to difference as a form of individual/collective action;
  • Spatio-temporalities drawn from empirical work

Please send proposed titles and abstracts (no more than 250 words) to Jayne Sellick (j.m.sellick@durham.ac.uk) by September 25th 2011.

References

  • Bissell, D. (2008). “Comfortable bodies: sedentary affects.” Environment and Planning A 40(7): 1697.
  • Crooks, V. A. and V. Chouinard (2006). “An embodied geography of disablement: Chronically ill women’s struggles for enabling places in spaces of health care and daily life.” Health & Place 12(3): 345-352.
  • Garland-Thomson, R. (2004). Integrating Disability, Transforming Feminist Theory. New Brunswick, N.J., Rutgers University Press.
  • Hansen, N. and Philo, C. (2007) “The Normality of doing things differently: bodies, spaces and disability” Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie 98 (4): 493-506
  • Macpherson, H. (2010). “Non Representational Approaches to Body–Landscape Relations.” Geography Compass 4(1): 1-13.
  • Parr, H. (2008). Mental health and social space : towards inclusionary geographies? Oxford, Blackwell.
DRF News

Announcing the DRF Seminar Schedule 2011-2012

Over the past year, the DRF blog has welcomed over 120 subscribers and received well over 13,600 hits.  Today we are please to announce the seminar schedule for 2011-2012 as well as full details for the first seminar on 11th October.  More information on the venue can be found here and we’d like to take this opportunity to remind all presenters of the Accessible Presenting Info here.  We look forward to productive and engaging discussions ahead.

1.                  11th October 2011 (Tues) 1pm-3pm 

Slot 1: Jayne Sellick (Department of Geography, University of Durham): The temporality of disabled identities: Examples from participatory work

Abstract: This paper explores the role of time and temporalities in the past and present experiences of participants, who as part of the project self-defined with a disabled identity. Drawing from a Participatory Action Research (P.A.R) agenda, stories relating to disability, impairment, health, chronic pain and illness were recalled. Using empirical examples I will explore the temporality of these experiences by thinking through the (non)representational.

Slot 2: Nick Hodge (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University): Misreading Arthur: Ableism at work in psychoanalysis and counselling

Abstract: Highly developed levels of reflection and self awareness by therapists and counsellors and the acceptance, and celebration, of the personal position of the client are foundational principles of counselling practice. It would be expected, therefore, that the counselling room might be the one space that would transcend the spectres of ableism (Campbell, 2009). However, the experiences of disabled people suggest that even here ableism continues to assert its insidious and invasive control (Reeve, 2000). This paper, by critiquing a particular account of psychotherapy with a disabled child, explores a number of ways in which ableism operates within the counselling room and negotiates the challenge of transversing different epistemic positions (Mackenzie and Leach Scully, 2007). The paper concludes by suggesting that only by watching their watching and reading their readings (Titchkosky, 2007) through an ‘inside-out’ approach (Williams, 1996) might counsellors reveal, confront and exorcise the spectres of ableism.

2.                 16th November 2011 (Weds) 2pm-4pm

3.                 6th December 2011 (Tues) 12pm-2pm

4.                 8th February 2012 (Weds) 1pm-3pm

5.                 15th March 2012 (Thurs) 1.30pm-3.30pm

6.                 18th April 2012 (Weds) 1pm-3pm

7.                 3rd May 2012 (Thurs) 2pm-4pm

Details of the other seminars will follow shortly.

If you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar please do get in touch.  Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book on which you’d like to facilitate discussion.  Please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk

DRF News

Critical Disability Studies *FREE* Conference *Theorizing Normalcy and the Mundane* 2011 – An Update

The Critical Disability Studies *FREE* Conference *Theorizing Normalcy and the Mundane* 2011 is fast approaching so we thought we’d give you a little reminder and update…

Dates and Venue: Wednesday 14th and Thursday 15th September 2011 held at Manchester Metropolitan University.

A FREE! conference co-hosted by the Research Institute of Health and Social Change at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU), University of Chester, University of Iceland, the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto and Sheffield Hallam University.

This two day conference builds upon the first, and hugely successfully, ‘Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane’ conference held in May 2010.  It brings together an international group of researchers and will address diverse issues including:

  • exploring the cultural and political production of normalcy
  • addressing our obsession with reason and rationality
  • connecting ableism with other hegemonies including heterosexism, racism and ageism
  • analysing the barriers and possibilities of the mundane and extraordinary
  • deconstructing new pathologies and ‘abnormalities’

Confirmed keynote speakers include Anat Greenstein (MMU, UK), Rebecca Mallett (Sheffield Hallam University, UK) and Fiona Kumari Campbell (Griffith University, Australia).

This year the conference is running alongside the Asylum 2011 Conference. The Asylum 2011 conference sessions have been incorporated into one overall programme and have been tagged accordingly. The abstracts are all together in the Normalcy conference abstracts booklet available here.  In the spirit of an eco-friendly conference, delegates are asked to print the details they require – there will not be hard copies of the programme/abstract available on the day.

Our aim is for this conference to be as inclusive as possible. We welcome activists, undergraduate and postgraduate students, practitioners and academics to join us. Deadline for attendance: 22nd August 2011

Both conferences have been extremely popular so if you are down to give a paper and/or to attend but now you cannot come, please let the organisers know soon as possible. 

As the conference is FREE!, lunch and refreshments will be available for purchase at the University, if you wish.  Please let us know if you have any dietary requirements so we can make the restaurant aware of delegate requirements.

Contact Details: For the sake of ease, we are keeping the original email so please email abstracts and attendance to: normalcy2010@hotmail.com

DRF News, Majority/Minority Worlds

New edition of disability research e-newletter released

The eighth issue of the Global South to North Disability Research Network E-newsletter is now available. 

Features include details of the Theorizing Normalcy and the Mundane 2nd International conference at MMU, an African Policy on Disability and Development (A-PODD) Project Update and information on the upcoming AfriNEAD Symposium 2011 in Zimbabwe.

To contribute or for further information, please contact email Tsitsi Chataika: tchataika@sun.ac.za

Critical Theory, DRF News, Events and Conferences

Critical Disability Studies *FREE* Conference *Theorizing Normalcy and the Mundane* 2011

A little reminder about the Critical Disability Studies *FREE* Conference *Theorizing Normalcy and the Mundane* 2011

Dates and Venue: Wednesday 14th and Thursday 15th September 2011 ~ 10am-4.30pm each day held at Manchester Metropolitan University.

A FREE! conference co-hosted by the Research Institute of Health and Social Change at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU), University of Chester, University of Iceland, the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto and Sheffield Hallam University.

This two day conference builds upon the first, and hugely successfully, ‘Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane’ conference held in May 2010.  It brings together an international group of researchers and calls for papers which will address diverse issues including:

  • exploring the cultural and political production of normalcy
  • addressing our obsession with reason and rationality
  • connecting ableism with other hegemonies including heterosexism, racism and ageism
  • analysing the barriers and possibilities of the mundane and extraordinary
  • deconstructing new pathologies and ‘abnormalities’

Confirmed keynote speakers include Anat Greenstein (MMU, UK) and Fiona Kumari Campbell (Griffith University, Australia).

Our aim is for this conference to be as inclusive as possible. We welcome activists, undergraduate and postgraduate students, practitioners and academics to join us.

In the spirit of an eco-friendly conference, registered delegates will be sent an e-pack. Details of accommodation near the venue will also be sent to delegates.

As the conference is FREE!, lunch and refreshments will be available for purchase at the University, if you wish.  Please let us know if you have any dietary requirements so we can make the restaurant aware of delegate requirements.

  • Deadline for paper abstracts: 4th April 2011 [since extended to 22nd May]
  • Deadline for attendance: 22nd August 2011

For the sake of ease, we are keeping the original email so please email abstracts and attendance to: normalcy2010@hotmail.com

If you are interested in this you may also be interested in the call for papers the *Critical Autism Seminar Day* at Sheffield Hallam University (18th January 2011: 9.45am-4,30pm) to be followed by the launch of Dan Goodley’s much anticipated new text, Disability Studies: An Interdisciplinary Introduction (4.30 – 6.00pm, with refreshments).

Critical Theory, DRF News, Events and Conferences

Disability-research events in November

Just a little reminder that on Wednesday 10th November 2010 (4.30pm – 6.00pm) Rebecca Lawthom (Reader in Community Practice, Research Institute for Health and Social Change, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK) will be discussing ‘The space between Disability Studies and Psychology: A place for Community Psychology?’. 

Everyone is welcome, but please contact Pam Hibbard at p.hibberd@shu.ac.uk to reserve a place. The seminar will take place in Room 10310 (Third Floor) Arundel Building at Sheffield Hallam University.

The next DRF seminar will be held on Monday 15th November 2010 (12pm-2pm) in Room 10111 (First Floor) Arundel Building, Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB.

The programme is as follows:

  • ‘Professional Development of SENTAs: Giving voice to TAs working with children with autism in mainstream primary schools’ ~ Alison Hall (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University)
  • ‘Playing grown-up: Troubling transition’ ~ Jenny Slater (Research Institute of Health and Social Change, Manchester Metropolitan University)

Information on upcoming disability research seminars and events can be found here.

Don’t forget to have a look at the ‘5 ways to get more involved’ in DRF which can be found here.