DRF News

Call for Papers: Pacific Rim Conference on Disability and Diversity (26th-27th March 2012, Hawaii, USA)

The Pacific Rim Conference on Disability and Diversity is being held 26th-27th March 2012 in Honolulu, HI (at the Hawai‘i Convention Center).

The Pacific Rim International Conference (Pac Rim) on Disability & Diversity has been widely recognized over the past 27 years as one of the most “diverse gatherings” in the world.  Each year the conference hews to its traditional areas which have bred much of the interdisciplinary research and educational advances of the last three decades. But each year new topics are introduced to stimulate discussion and change.  This year, those topic areas include:

Intersectionality, Disability Culture, and Global Change

Disability Studies approaches disability as a social and cultural phenomena in which localized and global interpretations include socio-cultural, historical, political and rights-based perspectives. The Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity topic area, Disability Studies: Intersectionality, Disability Culture, and Global Change, seeks to imagine and convey the role of Disability Studies in all areas of academic scholarship and within cultural, gender, race, and ethnic studies. We welcome proposals in any area of Disability Studies, including: – How scholars within and outside of typical disability studies curricula are incorporating disability studies in teaching and research. – Current developments and national and global approaches to Disability Studies programs – Historical and contemporary perspectives about Disability Studies – Impact of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on Disability Studies, Disability Culture, and Global Change – The role of the Internet and technology, including social networking, distance learning, Universal Design and online research tools, on Disability Studies research and dissemination – How has Disability Studies impacted other disciplines, including feminist and queer studies, American Studies, sociology, psychology, and other academic fields – The ways in which Disability Culture has informed Disability Studies, cultural, gender, race, ethnic, film, arts & cultural studies

Proposals in any presentation format are welcomed. Please see presentation formats on the webpage at: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/submissions/presenters/formats/

Please check the criteria for each format and ensure that you have the appropriate number of presenters for your chosen format. You may submit proposals online at: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/submissions or send your proposals via email to prcall@hawaii.edu.

For more information about this topic area, contact: Megan Conway mconway@hawaii.edu; Steve Brown sebrown@hawaii.edu; Norma Jean Stodden nstodden@hawaii.edu or Holly Manaseri hmanser@hawaii.edu.

For general information on the conference please contact Charmaine Crockett ccrocke@hawaii.edu 

For information on registration please contact Michael Corlew prreg@hawaii.edu

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DRF News

Call for Papers: The Normalcy of Difference (AAG, February 2012: New York, USA)

The following session is co-sponsored by the Disability Specialty Group and the Geographical Perspectives on Women (GPOW) Specialty Group, of the Association of American Geographers (AAG).

Call for Papers: The Normalcy of Difference

Event: Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers (AAG), February 24th–28th, New York, 2012

Session Organiser: Jayne Sellick (Durham University)

This session aims to explore the normalcy and/or acceptance of difference by focusing on disability, (mental) health, impairment and chronic illness and pain; however, papers may consider these and/or other embodied or gender differences by addressing conceptual, empirical and/or methodological work.

The normalcy of difference can be framed by drawing from various perspectives and thinking through new embodied geographies of inclusion (Parr 2008), as well as the interdisciplinary nature (Hansen and Philo, 2007) of difference research. These perspectives have drawn from the breadth of bodies represented through “multiple material, lived and imagined differences” (Crooks and Chouinard 2006): 346); while more recent body-object (Bissell 2008) and body-landscape (Macpherson 2010) relations refer to the nonrepresentational.  Papers may focus on:

  • The processes, practices and relationships that exist between, across and through these differences, object(s) and landscapes in space(s) and over time(s);
  • Conceptualising difference by focusing on the (non)representational and thinking through difference as a system, a set of practices, a relationship, kinds of embodiment, interactions with the built environment, frames of mind (Garland-Thomson 2004), an identity politics, an everyday experience, an assemblage;
  • Historiographies of difference and the role of space and time in accepting difference;
  • Methodological approaches to embodied and/or gender difference(s) and the role of participants in the research process;
  • The role of power relations (including those located in gender differences) in acceptance; the space and time of acceptance; the embodied difference of acceptance;
  • The potential of individual and collective action to (re)produce the (in)visibility of embodied difference;
  • The role of borders/boundaries in feminist/empowering approaches to difference as a form of individual/collective action;
  • Spatio-temporalities drawn from empirical work

Please send proposed titles and abstracts (no more than 250 words) to Jayne Sellick (j.m.sellick@durham.ac.uk) by September 25th 2011.

References

  • Bissell, D. (2008). “Comfortable bodies: sedentary affects.” Environment and Planning A 40(7): 1697.
  • Crooks, V. A. and V. Chouinard (2006). “An embodied geography of disablement: Chronically ill women’s struggles for enabling places in spaces of health care and daily life.” Health & Place 12(3): 345-352.
  • Garland-Thomson, R. (2004). Integrating Disability, Transforming Feminist Theory. New Brunswick, N.J., Rutgers University Press.
  • Hansen, N. and Philo, C. (2007) “The Normality of doing things differently: bodies, spaces and disability” Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie 98 (4): 493-506
  • Macpherson, H. (2010). “Non Representational Approaches to Body–Landscape Relations.” Geography Compass 4(1): 1-13.
  • Parr, H. (2008). Mental health and social space : towards inclusionary geographies? Oxford, Blackwell.
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Call for Papers: Chronic Disease and Disability (WSSA, April 2012, USA)

Conference Details: Western Social Science Association (WSSA) 54th Annual Conference (April 11th-14th, 2012 in Houston, Texas)

The WSSA’s 2012 annual national conference will take place in Houston, at the Hyatt Regency Houston and the Section on ‘Chronic Disease and Disability’ of the Western Social Science Association (the precursor of the Society for Disability Studies) invites you to present.

The Section encourages research on policies, problems, cultural representations, health issues, and experiences that involve people with disabilities and chronic disease. The Section invites abstracts for individual paper presentations, panels, or roundtables on a wide range of topics in disability studies.

For conference information including registration and hotel links, please visit the WSSA website at http://wssa.asu.edu. (The WSSA assumes that all participants will cover their own travel costs.)

DRF News, Publications

Recommended Reads: New Publications to Pre-Order this Summer…

The Question of Access by Tanya Titchkosky (Associate Professor and an Associate Department Chair at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Canada)

Description: Values such as ‘access’ and ‘inclusion’ are unquestioned in the contemporary educational landscape. But many methods of addressing these issues – installing signs, ramps, and accessible washrooms – frame disability only as a problem to be ‘fixed.’ The Question of Access investigates the social meanings of access in contemporary university life from the perspective of Cultural Disability Studies. Through narratives of struggle and analyses of policy and everyday practices, Tanya Titchkosky shows how interpretations of access reproduce conceptions of who belongs, where and when. Titchkosky examines how the bureaucratization of access issues has affected understandings of our lives together in social space. Representing ‘access’ as a beginning point for how disability can be rethought, rather than as a mere synonym for justice, The Question of Access allows readers to critically question their own implicit conceptions of disability, non-disability, and access.

Disability and Difference in Global Contexts: Enabling a Transformative Body Politic by Nirmala Erevelles (Associate Professor of Social Foundations of Education at the University of Alabama, USA.)

Description: This book explores the possibilities and limitations re-theorizing disability using historical materialism in the interdisciplinary contexts of social theory, cultural studies, social and education policy, feminist ethics, and theories of citizenship.

DRF News, Publications

New issue of JLCDS (5:1) is now available

The new issue of the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies (JLCDS)  is now available.  Volume 5, Issue 1 is a general issue bringing together the research interests of literary, cultural, and disability scholars from around the world.

Articles include:

  • Ann M. Fox (Davidson College, North Carolina, USA) considers Lynn Nottage’s Ruined;
  • Alex Tankard (University of Chester, UK) investigates of the place of the Victorian consumptive in Disability Studies;
  • D.H. Lawrence and the aesthetics of disability form the basis of an article by Valerie L. Popp (University of California, Los Angeles, USA);
  • Narrative constructions of motherhood and autism are the focus for Josje Weusten (Maastricht University, Netherlands);
  • Natalie Abbott (University of California, Berkeley, USA) writes about the Positive Exposure photography project;
  • Vivian Yenika-Agbaw (Pennsylvania State University, USA) focuses on disability in Hans Christian Andersen’s Tales.

The issue also contains comments from the field and book reviews by Pauline Eyre (University of Manchester, UK), Liz Crow (Roaring Girl Productions), and Michael Gill (University of Illinois at Chicago, USA).

The new issue is available in print and online formats to individuals and institutions who subscribe via Liverpool University Press; it is also part of the Project MUSE collection.

Critical Theory, DRF News, Events and Conferences, Media and Culture, Policy and Legislation

2011 Pacific Rim Conference on Disability: “Humanity: Advancing Inclusion, Equality and Diversity” Call for Papers

The 2011 Pacific Rim Conference on Disability: “Humanity: Advancing Inclusion, Equality and Diversity” to be held in Honolulu, Hawaii (18th-19th April 2011) is now calling for papers.  More informaiotn on the conference can be found here.  This post is specifically about the Disability Studies Strand: Culture, Policy and Global Change.

Disability Studies approaches disability as a social and cultural phenomena in which localized and global interpretations include socio-cultural, historical, political and rights-based perspectives.  The Pacific Rim International Conference on Disabilities topic area, Disability Studies: Culture, Policy and Global Change, seeks to imagine and convey where Disability Studies is at present, how it is evolving, and what it entails for the immediate and more distant future.

They welcome proposals in any area of Disability Studies, including:

  • Current developments and national and global approaches to Disability Studies programs;
  • Historical and contemporary perspectives about Disability Studies;
  • Retrospectives and future directions in celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the American’s with Disabilities Act;
  • Present and future impacts of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on Disability Studies
  • The role of the Internet and technology, including social networking, distance learning, Universal Design and online research tools, on Disability Studies research and dissemination
  • The intersections, including integration and collaboration, between Disability Studies and other disciplines
  • The ways in which Disability Culture has informed Disability Studies

Please see presentation formats on the Web site: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/submissions/presenters/formats/.

You may submit proposals online at: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/callforpapers/ or send your proposals via email to prcall@hawaii.edu.

For more information about this topic area, contact the Disability Studies Co-Chairs: