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Event: Next Steps for Policy on Children and Young People’s Health (February, 2017; London, UK)

Event: Next Steps for Policy on Children and Young People’s Health

Date: Thursday, 2nd February 2017

Place: Central London

Guest of Honour: Dr Jacqueline Cornish, National Clinical Director, Children, Young People and Transition to Adulthood, NHS England

Policymakers and stakeholders at this seminar will discuss next steps for improving children and young people’s health outcomes in England. Delegates will consider the early impact of new models of care on better coordinating children and young people’s health services, and the potential for Sustainable and Transformation Plans in integrating care for local populations. Further sessions focus on public health initiatives – such as the Government’s childhood obesity strategy and the introduction of the levy on the soft drinks industry from 2018, as well as progress on increasing the provision of high quality mental health care for children and young people, as outlined in NHS England’s Business Plan for 2016/17.

At this early stage, Eustace de Sousa, National Lead, Children, Young People and Families, Public Health England; Tim Atkin, Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Chair of Faculty for Children, Young people and their Families, Division of Clinical Psychology, British Psychological Society; Dr Chad Hockey, GP, Hammersmith and Fulham GP Federation; Matthew Hopkinson, Lead for Mental Health and Bullying, Department for Education; Toby Hyde, Head of Strategy, NHS Hammersmith and Fulham Clinical Commissioning Group; Kate Martin, Director, Common Room Consulting; Professor Neena Modi, President, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and Professor of Neonatal Medicine, Imperial College London; Dr Claire Lemer, Deputy Programme Director, Children and Young People’s Health Partnership and Consultant in General Paediatrics and Service Transformation, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust; Richard Stewart, Chair of the Children’s Surgical Forum, Royal College of Surgeons and Consultant Paediatric Surgeon, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham and Dr Sonia Saxena, Clinical Reader in Primary Care, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Imperial College London have also agreed to speak. Earl of Listowel, Vice-Chair, All‐Party Parliamentary Group for Looked After Children and Care Leavers and Helen Whately MP, Member, Health Select Committee and Co-Chair, All-Party Parliamentary Health Group have kindly agreed to chair this seminar.

Link for more info: http://www.westminsterforumprojects.co.uk/forums/event.php?eid=1369&t=1869

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Westminster Education Forum on Children’s Mental Health and Wellbeing (London, UK: October 2016)

Event title: Children’s mental health and wellbeing – integrating services, improving provision and the role of schools

Date: Tuesday, 11th October 2016

Place: Central London

This event is CPD certified

***Guest of Honour: Natasha Devon, Mental Health Champion, Department for Education***

To more info and to book a place – click here.

With Government’s plans to spend £1.25 billion on improving children’s mental health services over the next 5 years, this conference will bring together key stakeholders and policymakers to discuss priorities for children’s mental health – including measures to improve provision, commissioning and delivery. It follows concerns of an emerging ‘time bomb’ of serious mental health conditions in England, with evidence that 75% of mental health problems in adult life (excluding dementia) start by the age of 18. The conference takes place in the context of the Children and Young People’s Mental Health and Wellbeing Taskforce’s first major report, Future in Mind, which outlines how the NHS, schools, voluntary services and local authorities can better integrate mental health provision. It is also timed to come one year on from Natasha Devon’s appointment as the Department for Education’s first ever mental health champion, providing delegates with an opportunity to assess the progress that has been made in improving mental health provision for schoolchildren. Attendees will discuss steps to improve teachers’ awareness of mental health issues in school, including the role of the curriculum. They will also assess latest thinking in this area, such as a new blueprint for schools on counselling services, the implementation of renewed guidance and mental health lesson plans and the piloting of Heads of Wellbeing, who will be responsible for staff training, educating parents and promoting wellbeing in schools. The role of Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education in improving children’s understanding of mental health and wellbeing will also be considered. At this early stage, we are delighted that Natasha Devon, Mental Health Champion, Department for Education has agreed to be a Guest of Honour at this seminar.

The following have agreed to give keynote speeches:

  • Chris Caldwell, Dean of Healthcare Professions, North Central and East London Office, Health Education England;
  • Dr Davina Deniszczyc, Medical Executive Director, Nuffield Health;
  • Dr Neil Ralph, Programme Manager for Mental Health and Learning Disability, Health Education England;
  • Professor Stephen Scott, Chair, Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health and Professor of Child Health and Behaviour, King’s College London

The following have agreed to speak:

  • Dr Peter Hindley, Chair, Faculty of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Royal College of Psychiatrists;
  • Hannah Kinsey, Training and Consultancy Manager, YoungMinds;
  • Catherine Roche, Chief Executive, Place2Be;
  • Enver Solomon, Director of Evidence and Impact, National Children’s Bureau (NCB);
  • Dr Bernard Trafford, Headmaster, Royal Grammar School, Newcastle upon Tyne
  • A representative from Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), West London Mental Health Trust and North West London Collaboration of Clinical Commissioning Groups
DRF News

CFP: CAMHS 2014 Conference (Children and Young People’s Mental Health) – Northampton, UK: July, 2014

Event:  CAMHS 2014 Conference (Children and Young People’s Mental Health)

Theme: Learning from the Past, Looking to the Future

Date: 2-4 July 2014

Venue: Park Campus, University of Northampton, UK 

First call for papers: Following on from the successful 2013 Child and Adolescent Mental Health, this 3 day conference aims to provide a space in which professionals and academics can explore research, theory and practice in child and adolescent mental health. It is an opportunity to reflect on and critique established research, policy and practice, to share and celebrate what works, and to explore solutions to the challenges of the future.

Papers, posters, workshops, symposia and other contributions are invited that engage the conference theme. Some suggestions of possible focuses include:

  • Promoting mental health
  • Critical perspectives in children’s mental health
  • Widening access to CAMH services
  • Social relationships, mental health and wellbeing
  • Cultural issues in CAMHS
  • Innovations in CAMHS
  • Outcomes monitoring
  • Mental Health policy
  • Gender and sexualities
  • Working with families
  • Mental health in schools
  • • Early Interventions and many more

Keynote Speakers

Kathryn Pugh: Kathryn is the Programme Lead for Children and Young People’s IAPT. She has managed the programme since its inception in January 2011.  Her first job in the NHS was in primary care, moving to commissioning primary, secondary and specialist care in both acute and mental health. She joined YoungMinds to run SOS project for 16-25s and became Head of Policy and Innovation, leading for the Mental Health Alliance and Children’s Charities on lobbying to change the Mental Health Act to reflect the needs of children and young people, including amendments to prevent inappropriate admission of under 18s to adult mental health wards.

Kathryn joined the National CAMHS Support Service as a CAMHS Regional Development Worker in London and simultaneously worked for first NIMHE then NMHDU as National Lead for the Children and Young People’s Programme implementing the MHA 2007, then ran the joint NCSS NMHDU MH Transitions programme.

Professor Peter Fonagy, PhD, FBA, OBE: Peter is National Clinical Lead of Children and Young People’s Improving Access to Psychological Therapies and Director of UCL Partners’ Mental Health and Well-Being Programme.

Professor Peter Smith: Peter is Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Unit for School and Family Studies at Goldsmiths College, University of London. His research interests include social development in the home and school; play; aggression and bullying in childhood; cyberbullying; and the similarities and differences between bullying in western countries, Japan, and South Korea.

Dr Katherine Runswick-Cole: Katherine is a Senior Research Fellow in Disability Studies and Psychology, at Manchester Metropolitan University. Katherine’s research has mainly focused on the lives of disabled children and their families and draws on a critical disability studies perspective.

Professor Arlene Vetere: Arlene is professor of family therapy and systemic practice at Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, Norway, and affiliate professor of family studies, in the department of family studies, Malta University.  Arlene retired from her post as professor of clinical psychology at Surrey University in December, 2013 in order to spend more time writing. Her latest book is edited with Miochael Tarren-Sweeney, The Mental Health Needs of Vulnerable Children, published by Routledge, 2014. She has co-written ‘Systemic Therapy and Attachment Narratives’ with Rudi Dallos, 2009, Routledge.

Peter Stratton: Peter is Emeritus Professor of Family Therapy at the Leeds Family Therapy & Research Centre.

Submission for the First Call for Papers are invited. The closing date for the first call is 16 March 2014. You are welcome to submit either individual papers, symposia, or workshop proposals, as well as abstracts for posters. Please complete the abstract submission form.

Authors submitting their abstract for the first call for papers should expect a response from the panel by no later than 11 April 2014. This will enable them to take advantage of the Early Bird registration for the conference.

Second call for papers: The deadline for the second call for papers is 12 May 2014

Information regarding registration can be found here.

Please note that, as with all academic conferences, it is expected that speakers register for at least the day on which they are presenting. This facilitates shared learning, which is a key aim of the conference.

Contact us: please email: camhs@northampton.ac.uk

DRF News

Keynotes Announced for Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane Conference (Sheffield, UK: September 2013)

If you are in any doubt over whether you should attend the Theorising Normalcy and the Mundane: 4th International Conference at Sheffield Hallam University (September 3rd-4th 2013), here is a little taster of what will be on offer.

We are thrilled to announce two of this year’s keynotes speakers:

Dr Clare Barker, Lecturer in English (Medical Humanities) at the University of Leeds, UK will be discussing….

Whose Health? Biocolonialism, Postcolonial Medicine, and Normalcy Across Cultures

Abstract: In the Māori writer Patricia Grace’s novel Baby No-Eyes (1998), an indigenous activist counters arguments about ‘progress’ in genetic science and the benefits of finding ‘answers’ to health ‘problems’ with questions: “whose health problems are we talking about, and answers for who?”. These questions are productive and provocative as they unsettle some of the normalising functions of global biomedical discourses: assumptions that ‘health’ will look and feel the same across different cultures and communities; that we all want to know the same information about our genes and bodies, and aspire to the same goals of bodily function, appearance, and ability; and that advances in medical science will ultimately benefit all of humankind. This paper uses examples from literary texts such as Baby No-Eyes in order to unpack the universalism that underpins concepts such as ‘normalcy’, ‘health’ and ‘ability’. While organisations such as the WHO offer standardised models for measuring ‘health’ and identifying ‘problem’ areas, these texts provide alternative perspectives on what communities themselves perceive as ‘normal’, ‘unhealthy’ or ‘dysfunctional’, and stress the specialist cultural knowledge and resources that often determine how illness, disability, and medical intervention are experienced. Focusing especially on genetic research, the paper will highlight the continuities between extractive colonial practices and contemporary forms of ‘biocolonialism’ – the mining or exploitation of some human bodies (usually in the global South) for the benefit of others (most often, neoliberalised ‘normates’ in the global North). It will end by reflecting on what a postcolonial approach to global health, medicine, normalcy, and disability might look like. An approach that is attentive to cultural difference and specificity, I suggest, can help keep us vigilant about the kinds of normalisation that arise within medical discourse and provide conceptual resources for resisting the tyranny of the normal.

Bio: Clare Barker is the author of Postcolonial Fiction and Disability: Exceptional Children, Metaphor and Materiality (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011) and has co-edited two special issues of the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies: ‘Disabling Postcolonialism’ (2010, with Stuart Murray) and ‘Disability and Native American/Indigenous Studies’ (2013, with Siobhan Senier). Her research is situated at the intersection of postcolonial studies, disability studies and medical humanities, and focuses on representations of disability, health, illness, and medicine in world literatures and cultures. She is interested in the ways in which disability, health and illness are constructed in local and global contexts, and how fiction can transform our understanding of embodied difference, medical encounters, and the politics of health. Clare is currently working on two new research projects: one is a collaborative AHRC-funded project on community health and wellbeing in the UK, in which she will focus on the relationship between health and ethnicity in British Asian communities and literatures. The other, tentatively entitled ‘Postcolonial Health: Literature, Medicine, Activism’, will explore the representation of health crises, global biomedical debates, and health-related community activism in postcolonial literatures and film. This will include work on fictional and activist representations of the Bhopal disaster, indigenous responses to the Human Genome Diversity Project, and disability-related protests against the sponsorship of the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics.

 

Dr Jenny Slater, Lecturer in Education and Disability Studies at the Sheffield Hallam University, UK will be discussing….

The (Normal) Non-normativity of Youth

Abstract: Youth unnerves us. Awkwardly bridging the space between ‘child’ and ‘adult’, we are delivered demonising depictions of young people (hoodies and hooligans), and working out how to deal with these not-quite children but not-quite-adults is high on policy makers’ agendas (Slater, 2013, f.c.). On the other hand, the non-normativity of ‘teenage rebellion’ is considered an ‘identity forming’ rite of passage for young people to cross the border zone between child and adult (Lesko, 2002). We hear, in fact, young people scorned upon for their apolitical, apathetic acceptance of normativity – the youth today a pale reflection of their predecessors (Bennett, 2008).  Even our ever-so reasonable politicians tell us that they “[did] things that teenagers do”, before they “pulled [themselves] up and headed in the right [direction]”  (Cameron in Watt, 2009).

This paper will explore how, through youth, ‘non-normativity’ emerges as a place allowed, indeed expected, as a stage of ‘normative development’. I will argue, however, that it is a stage only permissible to young people fitting neatly into other culturally privileged positions. Furthermore, it must be played out by meeting other societal expectations (‘masculinity’ – lads will be lads; first heterosexual encounters, and so on) which set young people on the path to normative adulthood. Commercialised and commodified ‘what it is to be young’, I argue, is an illustration of the required flexible neoliberal subject; it is okay to be ‘non-normative’ if ‘non-normativity’ can be compartmentalised, as a phase to be grown-out of, and later periodically bought into. Drawing on fieldwork with disabled young people alongside other cultural and media representations of ‘youth’ and ‘youth culture’, I will argue that perceived  ‘non-normativity’ leaves young people not fitting into other culturally priveledged positions much more precariously positioned.

Bio: Jenny Slater is a lecturer in Education and Disability Studies at Sheffield Hallam University. Her doctoral work with young disabled people drew on critical disability studies frameworks to consider cultural constructions of ‘youth’ and ‘disability’. Jenny is interested in how youth and disability ‘play out’ with other intersectional identities, particularly gender and sexuality.

 

Keep up to date via the Normalcy 2013 page on the DRF blog: https://disabilityresearchforum.wordpress.com/events/normalcy-2013/, join the debate on twitter #normalcy2013 and, remember, to book a place at the conference, please visit normalcy2013.eventbrite.co.uk