Disability Research Forum

… creating spaces for thinking through

Event: Other Psychotherapies – Across Time, Space, and Cultures (April, 2017: Glasgow, UK)

Posted by rebeccamallett on December 1, 2016

Event: Other Psychotherapies – Across Time, Space, and Cultures

Date: Monday 3rd – Tuesday 4th April 2017

Location: Wolfson Medical Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LQ (UK)

Keynote Speakers:

  • Dr Claudia Lang, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich: ‘Theory and practice in Ayurvedic psychotherapy’
  • Dr Chiara Thumiger, Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick: ‘Therapies of the word in ancient medicine’
  • Dr Elizabeth Roxburgh, Psychology, University of Northampton: ‘Anomalous experiences and mental health’
  • Dr Jennifer Lea, Geography, University of Exeter: ‘Building “A Mindful Nation”? The use of mindfulness meditation in educational, health and criminal justice settings’

The Wellcome Trust-funded conference ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’ brings contemporary Western expertise into dialogue with psychotherapeutic approaches from ‘other’ spatially, historically or otherwise ‘distant’ cultures. Having confirmed the programme of speakers for the event, we are delighted to announce that general registration is now open.

Registration: Registration costs £40 for general admittance, and £15 for students/service users. Ticket price includes attendance at the conference on 3rd-4th April 2017, including lunch and refreshments on both days, and a buffet dinner on Mon 3rd April.

  • To register, and to see our full programme of speakers, please visit our Eventbrite page.

Please email the organisers at arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk if you have any queries.

Organising Committee:

  • Dr Gavin Miller (Chair), Medical Humanities Research Centre/English Literature, University of Glasgow
  • Dr Sofia Xenofontos, Classics, University of Glasgow
  • Dr Cheryl McGeachan, Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow
  • Dr Ross White, Psychological Sciences, University of Liverpool

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Reminder: DRF is back on Monday with a session on ‘Thinking with ‘Chemical Stories’

Posted by rebeccamallett on November 25, 2016

Just a quick reminder that the dates for 16-17 seminar series schedule is now available, along with details of the first seminar.

Dr. Kirsty Liddiard (University of Sheffield) and Dr. Esther Ignagni (Ryerson University, Toronto) will be sharing their groundbreaking, internationally acclaimed work, “Thinking with ‘Chemical Stories’” on Monday, 28th November 2016, 11am-1pm, Arundel 10311 (Sheffield Hallam University).

More info here.

Venue: Seminars are held in the Arundel Building, 122 Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB.  For a map of City Campus click here.

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Event: Next steps for transforming caring for people with learning disabilities (Jan. 2017: London, UK)

Posted by rebeccamallett on November 25, 2016

Event Title: Next Steps For Transforming Caring For People With Learning Disabilities: Funding, Integration and Community Care

Date: Friday, 27th January 2017

Place: Central London

– This event is CPD certified –

With local Transforming Care Partnerships (TCPs) beginning their work, this timely seminar will provide an opportunity to assess future policy priorities for people with learning disabilities across health and social care.

Delegates will consider the implementation of NHS England’s Building the Right Support plan, with local plans proposed by TCPs – collaborations between Clinical Commissioning Groups, local authorities and specialised commissioners – due to be assessed against countrywide objectives, with the aim of, by 2019, reducing the reliance on inpatient care and establishing a national service delivery model for commissioners and providers.

Further sessions focus on the impact of population-based healthcare, via new 
Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs), on care for people with learning disabilities, the impact of new inspection methodologies announced in the CQC’s five-year strategy on the regulation of care, and priorities for personalising care in light of the national rollout of the Integrated Personal Commissioning programme – as well as improving access to primary care for people with learning disabilities.

A service user from CHANGE has agreed to deliver an address at the seminar.

Professor Jane Cummings, Chief Nursing Officer, NHS England has also agreed to deliver an address at this seminar.

Sue Darker, Operations Director, Learning Disabilities and Mental Health, Hertfordshire County Council; Sharon Jeffreys, Head of Commissioning – Learning Disabilities, NHS South West Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group; Dr Theresa Joyce, National Professional Advisor on Learning Disabilities, CQC; Sarah Maguire, Director, Learning Disability England (formerly Housing & Support Alliance) and Managing Director, Choice Support; Dr Neil Ralph, Programme Manager for Mental Health and Learning Disability, Health Education England and; Jim Thomas, Programme Head – Workforce Innovation, Skills for Care have also agreed to speak. 

Lord Adebowale, Non-Executive Director, NHS England and Chief Executive Officer, Turning Point has kindly agreed to chair a session at this seminar.

 

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CfP: ‘Queer/Crip Contagions’ for Special Issue of ‘Feminist Formations’

Posted by jenslater on November 17, 2016

Queer/Crip Contagions
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Feminist Formations

Edited by Kelly Fritsch and Anne McGuire
Full Papers due February 1, 2017
https://www.feministformations.org/submit/calls-for-papers

This special issue charts the limits and possibilities of queer/crip biosocial politics by examining the ways these intersect and co-mingle with the narratives, practices, and temporalities of contagion. Feminist scholars have long theorized “queer” and “crip” as unsettling, strange, twisted, or disruptive. Moreover, feminists have demonstrated how a queer/crip refusal of closure invites a range of discursive and embodied forms of contestation and coalition, offering radical alternatives to assimilationist or reformist politics. The coming together of queer and crip is an unstable yet fruitful site of interdisciplinary and multispecies exposure and exchange. Building upon and extending these insights, this special issue will trace the multiple and unexpected ways “queer” and “crip” influence and infect one another. Drawing on the etymology of contagion as “a touching, contact” or “touching closely,” how do queer and crip come into contact? What is absorbed? What is exchanged? And, what is or might yet be produced at this site? We solicit a diverse collection of articles emanating from a range of interdisciplinary fields and areas of study, but that are also united by a shared commitment to queer and crip the discourses and practices of contagion itself.

Bound by neither body nor border, contagion has become an emergent area of interest among scholars working at the intersections of critical race, transnational feminisms, queer theory and disability studies. Indeed, contagion frequently incites medical and moral crisis and panic through its historical, transnational, colonial, and imperial links to racial, sexual, and ability formations and violence. Jasbir Puar argues that the lexicon of contagion and disease “suture” together “etymological and political links” connecting racist/orientalist fears of border penetration and infiltration with cultural anxieties around queer, sick and/or disabled bodies (2007, 52). Mel Chen describes a queer/crip contagion that “de-territorializes,” exhibiting a unique flexibility to move “through and against imperialistic spatializations of ‘here’ and ‘there’” (2012, 167). Neel Ahuja marks contagion through projects of public health intervention and US empire that embed national defense and imperial interests in the racialized, gendered, sexualized, and ableist materializations of bodies (2016, xvi). Scholarship on the ongoing histories and logics of eugenics demonstrates how cultural ideologies of disability-as-threat contaminate and co-mingle with sexually and racially-coded narratives of biological in/security, thus legitimizing a range of neo/colonial and imperial health and hygiene practices in the name of individual, social, and economic development. By tracking contagion through contemporary discourses on viral diseases (i.e., Zika, HIV/AIDS, SARS, West Nile, Avian Flu, H1N1, or the range of diseases and illnesses associated with bioterrorism and biosecurity) and through the “epidemicization” of such phenomena as obesity, autism, smoking, poverty, violent crime, or toxic lead poisoning, we can develop a better sense of the cross-contamination between categories of race, gender, sexuality, and disability. Moreover, we can better understand how these categories have become essential to the organization of modern conceptualizations of human worth/value and to the authorization of an array of paternalistic, clinical, and imperial and colonial interventions.

Contagion most often comes to be associated with danger and undesirability – a racialized, pathological threat to be neutralized, eliminated, or cured. As contagion replicates and spreads through the expanding folds and ever-widening spectrums of illness, threats to our health and to our communities remain elusive and transitory, always eclipsed, always on the future horizon. Yet, contagion moves in indeterminate ways. Working to reorganize and manage both spatial/temporal relations, contagion de-regulates categories of health and disorder, while also and at the same time, anticipates the increased regulation and surveillance of bodies, minds and movements; contagion stimulates temporalities of speed, urgency and emergency, while also producing moments of stillness and suspended animation. Traveling along non-linear, transnational circuits spanning “then” and “now,” “here” and “there,” the queer/crip site of contagion provides a unique vantage for interrogating the violence of global capitalism, imperialism, colonialism, and its biosocial economies of human/nonhuman worth and precarity. Unbounded, intimate, and indeterminate, contagion also provides the grounds for provocative encounters and exchange: novel alliances between patients, scientists, politicians, doctors, biotech companies, community groups, and many others, that give rise to new kinds of biosocial relations. Contagion suggests a site of exposure, a vector of change, or a transgressive mixing that does not stay still. Theories of queer/crip contagion ask: which forms of embodiment are incorporated into life and which are put into quarantine or driven out of this vital fold? (Ahuja 2016; Puar 2012; McRuer 2010).

This special issue asks: how are queer/crip contagions – conceived of as unbounded convergences of bodies, minds, and meanings – working to open up new sites of, and for, social and political exchange? How are crip/queer contagions replicating, and spreading in ways that avoid the pitfalls of what Priscilla Wald (2008) has referred to as “outbreak narratives”? In other words, how are queer/crip narratives refusing social, political, medical, and moral containment by pushing back against 21st century tools and techniques aimed at controlling, capturing, arresting, or otherwise limiting the possibilities of and for biosocial politics: risk management, for example, neoliberal demands for flexibility, homo/able nationalism, clinical and state interventions and occupations, racialized violence, and/or ongoing colonial or imperial development projects?

This issue will build upon, enliven, and complicate emergent scholarship at the nexus of queer and crip. The editors encourage the submission of transnational feminist and intersectional work that engages queer/crip in relation to ethnicity, race, gender, disability, sexuality, age, citizenship, class and other socially produced categories of difference.

We welcome submissions related to, but not limited to the following questions: 

How are crip and queer theory shaped by the discourses and practices of contagion? What new kinds of epistemological and political frameworks emerge out of cross-contaminations between “queer” and “crip”?

What social and political meanings underpin the issue’s key terms ‘queer’, ‘crip’ and ‘contagion’? How are these categories produced by and responsive to ongoing histories of racism/ableism/heteronormativity/sexism?

How are transnational feminist perspectives penetrating queer/crip knowledge production? What new kinds of knowledge might yet be produced by attending to transnational issues and perspectives?

How do the lived experiences of queerness, disability, and chronic illness change across boundaries of race, ethnicity, class, and gender?

How do queer and crip challenge and reconfigure received understandings of kinship relations and imaginaries?

What are the limits and possibilities of thinking crip/queer as fluid, graded spectrums anchored by such binaries as homo/hetero, sickness/health, normal/abnormal?

How do changing forms of securitization impact queer/crip contagions? How do the discourses of contagion figure crip/queer bodies as threats to national security?
How does contagion influence disabled/queer/trans/race mobility across borders? What is the relationship between discourses of contagion and state or national practices of containment such as arrest/detention/delay?

How do increases in biometrics, biosecurity, and bioterrorism impact queer/crip contestations and coalitions?

What is the temporality of the contagion? How does contagion mediate our movements? Impact chronicity?

How are epidemics produced? What does and does not get framed as an epidemic? As non-contagious social “problems” like autism and obesity get narrated in terms of spreading epidemics, what work is and is not accomplished via contagion as metaphor?

What does social and moral panic over widespread/spreading diseases, disabilities and illnesses caused by viruses (e.g., Zika) or contaminants (e.g., lead, mercury, exposure to plasticizers, dirty water) reveal about cultural understandings of disability? How might a queer/crip reading of such events enrich/complicate our understandings of social advocacy (e.g., environmental activism, racial justice or reproductive rights)?

What is the relation between queer/crip contagions and immunization?

What might a queer/crip critique of epidemic/pandemic preparedness (e.g., evacuation plans, triage policies, etc.) look like?

How might a queer/crip framework of contagion critique or engage the exportation of health/hygiene techniques from the global north to global south? How would a queer/crip analysis of contagion both complicate and enrich analyses of global healthcare imbalances and political debates about unequal access to treatments/immunizations/cures in the Global South?

How do queer/crip contagions contest or mark the failure of imperialist, colonialist, and/or capitalist practices of biosecurity, biometrics, or governance?
As we track and follow the patterns/trajectory of contagions, where will it take us? What new forms of inter/transdisciplinary alliances might open up?

And/or that engage the following key topics:

Virality; Immunity; Epidemics; Public health; Crip/queer time, temporalities, futures, futurities; Chronicity, chronic conditions; Capitalism, neoliberalism, austerity, precarity; Bioeconomies, biocapitalism, economization or financialization of life; Toxicity; Hybridity; Trans-ability; Intra-species relations; Health, hygiene, healthism;  Nature/Culture;  Disability, illness, impairment, madness, Deafness, neurodiverity; Making kin;  Ecologies, environments; Affect; Cripistemologies; Trauma, memory;  Nation, colonialism, imperialism; Biosecurity and racialization/pathologization; Bioterrorism

Guest Editors:

Kelly Fritsch, Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, Women & Gender Studies Institute and Technoscience Research Unit, University of Toronto kelly.fritsch@utoronto.ca
Anne McGuire, Assistant Professor, Equity Studies Program, University of Toronto anne.mcguire@utoronto.ca

Submission Process: Full papers (between 8,000- 11,000 words including references) should be sent by February 1, 2017 to Kelly Fritsch (kelly.fritsch@utoronto.ca)   and Anne McGuire (anne.mcguire@utoronto.ca). Please include “Queer/Crip Contagions Submission” in the subject line of your submission.

Author(s) should include three files as attachments:

1. Cover page with identifying information including name, title, institutional affiliation, address, phone numbers, and email;
2. Abstract and keywords;
3. Complete manuscript, with all identifying information removed. Files must be in Word (.doc) or Rich Text Format (.rtf).

All submissions must follow the Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) author-date system with parenthetical citations. All text, including quotations, must be double-spaced.

Following the deadline, guest editors will review the manuscripts and determine those to be sent for full anonymous review.

Feminist Formations style guide is available at: https://feministformations.org/sites/default/files/FeministFormationsStyleGuide2.pdf

Please contact either of the co-editors with questions or concerns about the submission process.

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Desiring Disability Research Symposium, Sheffield, 23rd November

Posted by jenslater on November 17, 2016

Desiring Disability Symposium, University of Sheffield, 23rd November 2016, 12.00-17.00

Location: Room 8.07, Husband Building (Education Building), University of Sheffield, 388 Glossop Road, Sheffield, S10 2JA

Note: There is construction outside of the building, which is still accessible, but it is advised to give more time to find your way in

Programme

Introductory speech from:

Professor Dan Goodley:  Desiring Dis/ability

Presenters:

Holly Burkinshaw & Antonios Ktenidis: The Desire of Disability to the Study of Spatiality

Marek Mackiewicz: “Life Feels Good”

Vicky Mann: Students’ Lived Experience as a Learning Resource to Transform Learning

Lindsay Miller: Cripping Disability: Unsettling Positionality and the Rituals of Categorization

Michael Miller: CripQueering the Classroom: Smashing the Social Construction of Desire

Abstracts

Holly Burkinshaw & Antonios Ktenidis

The Desire of Disability to the Study of Spatiality

 Spatiality and human Geography has been a part of Disability Studies since the formation of UPIAS (Abberly, 1987; Oliver, 2009) but to what extent has Disability Studies scholars engaged with spatial theories? Drawing on the intersectionality of Critical Disability Studies (Goodley, 2011), this presentation unpicks some of the nuances of spatial geographies as set out by Procter (2015); Hackett (2015) and Curtis, (2015) to examine if, and how, Critical Disability Studies scholars can benefit from considering a spatial lens. Lefebvre’s (1994) ‘Spatial Triad’ is utilised to help to make sense of the perceived, conceived and lived spaces of disability alongside Kitchin’s (1998) ideas around the ‘power of space’ that ‘keep disabled people in place’. We highlight the enforcement of normalcy in space (Davis, 1995) and spatial design in relation to dis/placing or Dis/playing non-normative bodies before introducing our concept of ‘Dis-spatiality’. These ideas are drawn together by considering the dis/placed and dis/criminatory landscapes of dis/ability and embodiment (Michalko and Titchkosky, 2001) in order to challenge dominant ablest scriptures of space and place. Finally, we utilize Kraftl’s (2013) ideas to consider how children and young people move ‘beyond voice’ and ‘beyond agency’ to resist dominant spatial scriptures and, in doing so, actively resisting and re-constructing the landscapes of Dis-spatiality.

Marek Mackiewicz

“Life Feels Good”

The departure point for this presentation is the assertion that to understand a phenomenon, one needs to look at its social and cultural contexts (e.g. Berger & Luckmann, 1967; Gergen, 1985; Snyder & Mitchell, 2006). This means that attending to these social and cultural aspects is essential for a broad, wholesome understanding of any problem that one might research. The particular aim of this chapter is to explore what does Pieprzyca’s (2013) ‘Life feels good’ say about the socio-cultural construction of disability in Poland.

Employing the cultural model of disability (e.g. Garland Thomson, 2002) and Snyder and Mitchell’s (2006) ‘cultural locations of disability’, I deliberate on the problematic depiction of desire and disabled person’s desirability in the critically acclaimed film.

My argument is that the film sustains and / or reproduces the ideology of ‘personal tragedy theory’ (Oliver, 1996, p. 119) and neoliberal ableism  (Goodley, 2014). It does so, in part by exploiting the trope of disability to evoke emotions (Snyder & Mitchell, 2006) and if it is so the representation of disability in it, is invariably tainted.

Vicky Mann

Students’ Lived Experience as a Learning Resource to Transform Learning

This session considers how the lived experiences of students with disabilities can inform both practice and research. It shows how these experiences can be harnessed to improve inclusivity in teaching and develop innovative teaching practices, for example, developing inclusive assessments and teaching strategies. Further, it discusses how these experiences can inform research. It uses the case study of how a student who had experienced cancer related fatigue used this experience to develop a new way of thinking about fatigue, and had his research accepted at an international cancer conference (the NRCI).

Lindsay Miller

Cripping Disability: Unsettling Positionality and the Rituals of Categorization

Is disability undesirable? Is disability desirable? In order to get at the material-discursive underpinnings that produce the experience of un/desire, why must we first queer, subvert, destabilize and crip the category of ‘disability’ itself? While cripping is said to problematize and resist able-bodied/-minded assumptions of what constitutes ‘normal,’ this presentation will instead crip disability in order to problematize and resist some of the taken for granted assumptions of what constitutes disability/abnormality. Relatedly, meaning-making and the impossibility of rendering positionality, location, or context irrelevant to content will be attended to as a way to unsettle the tendency to delink our epistemic location from the various ways we actively produce knowledge (Alcoff, 1991; Scott, 1992). This presentation will also explore categorization as a ritual of sorts, with rituals being carriers of cultural codes symbolically transmitting ideologies that shape our perceptions, ways of understanding, and experiencing which are inextricably linked to relationships of power (McLaren, 1986). It is through becoming aware of how we shape and are shaped by the precarity involved in the performativity of ritual that we can embrace this precarity to further disrupt dominant, oppressive and often imperialistic structures (both external and internal) (McCormarck, 2014; Grech, 2012).

Michael Miller

CripQueering the Classroom: Smashing the Social Construction of Desire

The focus of this paper is on disability in the education system and the forms of violence that occur when an environment (classroom) doesn’t challenge dominant conceptions of ‘normal’ and its necessary, and necessarily undesirable opposite, ‘abnormal’ – simultaneously reinforcing ‘normal’ and punishing ‘abnormal’ (behaviors, desires, bodies, etc.). This paper will present potential opportunities to ‘cripqueer the classroom’ by offering ideas and challenges for dissenting from the systems of ‘compulsory heterosexuality’ (Rich 1980), ‘compulsory able-bodiedness’ (McRuer 2006) and ‘compulsory able-mindedness’ (Kafer2013) that serve to justify legal and social surveillance/exclusion/control and other forms of violence in (and out of) the classroom.

By (co)creating space where the mandated normative structure of the classroom (e.g. design, curriculum, student/teacher and student/student dynamics) is cripqueered, opportunities to first expose and challenge indoctrinated desires are opened up to later consider one’s own non-normative desires. Breaking down the power dynamic between teacher/student through the incorporation of something as (seemingly) simple as conversation (in the various ways that manifests) rather than the standard ‘banking model of education’ (Freire 1970) poses challenges and opportunities that a prefigurative approach will necessarily be emphasized.

Content Note: This presentation will include some talk of violence, as well as what some may consider coarse language.

 

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Disability Studies Reading Group, Sheffield, November 17th

Posted by jenslater on November 7, 2016

After the success of the first Disability Studies Reading group 2016/17 at Sheffield Hallam University, I am happy to announce that meeting two will be taking place on November the 17th.

The informal discussion will be at Charles Street Building, Sheffield Hallam University, City Campus, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB in room12.4.03 at 12pm.

The article to be discussed is:

Macleod, A., Lewis, A., Robertson, C. (2013) Why Should I Be Like Bloody Rain Man?! Navigating the Autistic Identity, British Journal of Special Education, 40(1), 41-49.

The following questions have been proposed to be thinking about, whilst you read:

  1. What is the importance of first-hand accounts?
  2. What could a constructive ‘autism identity’ look like?
  3. What are the positives and negatives of a diagnosis? A label? A group identity?

Please contact me at srhannam@my.shu.ac.uk for further information, access to the article, or if you have any questions about accessibility. If you can’t make this month’s session but you are interested in future sessions and want to be added to the email list, please also drop me a line!

Hope to see you soon,

Stephanie Hannam-Swain

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CfP: Queer/Crip Contagions

Posted by jenslater on November 7, 2016

Queer/Crip Contagions
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Feminist Formations

Edited by Kelly Fritsch and Anne McGuire
Full Papers due February 1, 2017
https://www.feministformations.org/submit/calls-for-papers

This special issue charts the limits and possibilities of queer/crip biosocial politics by examining the ways these intersect and co-mingle with the narratives, practices, and temporalities of contagion. Feminist scholars have long theorized “queer” and “crip” as unsettling, strange, twisted, or disruptive. Moreover, feminists have demonstrated how a queer/crip refusal of closure invites a range of discursive and embodied forms of contestation and coalition, offering radical alternatives to assimilationist or reformist politics. The coming together of queer and crip is an unstable yet fruitful site of interdisciplinary and multispecies exposure and exchange. Building upon and extending these insights, this special issue will trace the multiple and unexpected ways “queer” and “crip” influence and infect one another. Drawing on the etymology of contagion as “a touching, contact” or “touching closely,” how do queer and crip come into contact? What is absorbed? What is exchanged? And, what is or might yet be produced at this site? We solicit a diverse collection of articles emanating from a range of interdisciplinary fields and areas of study, but that are also united by a shared commitment to queer and crip the discourses and practices of contagion itself.

Bound by neither body nor border, contagion has become an emergent area of interest among scholars working at the intersections of critical race, transnational feminisms, queer theory and disability studies. Indeed, contagion frequently incites medical and moral crisis and panic through its historical, transnational, colonial, and imperial links to racial, sexual, and ability formations and violence. Jasbir Puar argues that the lexicon of contagion and disease “suture” together “etymological and political links” connecting racist/orientalist fears of border penetration and infiltration with cultural anxieties around queer, sick and/or disabled bodies (2007, 52). Mel Chen describes a queer/crip contagion that “de-territorializes,” exhibiting a unique flexibility to move “through and against imperialistic spatializations of ‘here’ and ‘there’” (2012, 167). Neel Ahuja marks contagion through projects of public health intervention and US empire that embed national defense and imperial interests in the racialized, gendered, sexualized, and ableist materializations of bodies (2016, xvi). Scholarship on the ongoing histories and logics of eugenics demonstrates how cultural ideologies of disability-as-threat contaminate and co-mingle with sexually and racially-coded narratives of biological in/security, thus legitimizing a range of neo/colonial and imperial health and hygiene practices in the name of individual, social, and economic development. By tracking contagion through contemporary discourses on viral diseases (i.e., Zika, HIV/AIDS, SARS, West Nile, Avian Flu, H1N1, or the range of diseases and illnesses associated with bioterrorism and biosecurity) and through the “epidemicization” of such phenomena as obesity, autism, smoking, poverty, violent crime, or toxic lead poisoning, we can develop a better sense of the cross-contamination between categories of race, gender, sexuality, and disability. Moreover, we can better understand how these categories have become essential to the organization of modern conceptualizations of human worth/value and to the authorization of an array of paternalistic, clinical, and imperial and colonial interventions.

Contagion most often comes to be associated with danger and undesirability – a racialized, pathological threat to be neutralized, eliminated, or cured. As contagion replicates and spreads through the expanding folds and ever-widening spectrums of illness, threats to our health and to our communities remain elusive and transitory, always eclipsed, always on the future horizon. Yet, contagion moves in indeterminate ways. Working to reorganize and manage both spatial/temporal relations, contagion de-regulates categories of health and disorder, while also and at the same time, anticipates the increased regulation and surveillance of bodies, minds and movements; contagion stimulates temporalities of speed, urgency and emergency, while also producing moments of stillness and suspended animation. Traveling along non-linear, transnational circuits spanning “then” and “now,” “here” and “there,” the queer/crip site of contagion provides a unique vantage for interrogating the violence of global capitalism, imperialism, colonialism, and its biosocial economies of human/nonhuman worth and precarity. Unbounded, intimate, and indeterminate, contagion also provides the grounds for provocative encounters and exchange: novel alliances between patients, scientists, politicians, doctors, biotech companies, community groups, and many others, that give rise to new kinds of biosocial relations. Contagion suggests a site of exposure, a vector of change, or a transgressive mixing that does not stay still. Theories of queer/crip contagion ask: which forms of embodiment are incorporated into life and which are put into quarantine or driven out of this vital fold? (Ahuja 2016; Puar 2012; McRuer 2010).

This special issue asks: how are queer/crip contagions – conceived of as unbounded convergences of bodies, minds, and meanings – working to open up new sites of, and for, social and political exchange? How are crip/queer contagions replicating, and spreading in ways that avoid the pitfalls of what Priscilla Wald (2008) has referred to as “outbreak narratives”? In other words, how are queer/crip narratives refusing social, political, medical, and moral containment by pushing back against 21st century tools and techniques aimed at controlling, capturing, arresting, or otherwise limiting the possibilities of and for biosocial politics: risk management, for example, neoliberal demands for flexibility, homo/able nationalism, clinical and state interventions and occupations, racialized violence, and/or ongoing colonial or imperial development projects?

This issue will build upon, enliven, and complicate emergent scholarship at the nexus of queer and crip. The editors encourage the submission of transnational feminist and intersectional work that engages queer/crip in relation to ethnicity, race, gender, disability, sexuality, age, citizenship, class and other socially produced categories of difference.

We welcome submissions related to, but not limited to the following questions: 

How are crip and queer theory shaped by the discourses and practices of contagion? What new kinds of epistemological and political frameworks emerge out of cross-contaminations between “queer” and “crip”?

What social and political meanings underpin the issue’s key terms ‘queer’, ‘crip’ and ‘contagion’? How are these categories produced by and responsive to ongoing histories of racism/ableism/heteronormativity/sexism?

How are transnational feminist perspectives penetrating queer/crip knowledge production? What new kinds of knowledge might yet be produced by attending to transnational issues and perspectives?

How do the lived experiences of queerness, disability, and chronic illness change across boundaries of race, ethnicity, class, and gender?

How do queer and crip challenge and reconfigure received understandings of kinship relations and imaginaries?

What are the limits and possibilities of thinking crip/queer as fluid, graded spectrums anchored by such binaries as homo/hetero, sickness/health, normal/abnormal?

How do changing forms of securitization impact queer/crip contagions? How do the discourses of contagion figure crip/queer bodies as threats to national security?
How does contagion influence disabled/queer/trans/race mobility across borders? What is the relationship between discourses of contagion and state or national practices of containment such as arrest/detention/delay?

How do increases in biometrics, biosecurity, and bioterrorism impact queer/crip contestations and coalitions?

What is the temporality of the contagion? How does contagion mediate our movements? Impact chronicity?

How are epidemics produced? What does and does not get framed as an epidemic? As non-contagious social “problems” like autism and obesity get narrated in terms of spreading epidemics, what work is and is not accomplished via contagion as metaphor?

What does social and moral panic over widespread/spreading diseases, disabilities and illnesses caused by viruses (e.g., Zika) or contaminants (e.g., lead, mercury, exposure to plasticizers, dirty water) reveal about cultural understandings of disability? How might a queer/crip reading of such events enrich/complicate our understandings of social advocacy (e.g., environmental activism, racial justice or reproductive rights)?

What is the relation between queer/crip contagions and immunization?

What might a queer/crip critique of epidemic/pandemic preparedness (e.g., evacuation plans, triage policies, etc.) look like?

How might a queer/crip framework of contagion critique or engage the exportation of health/hygiene techniques from the global north to global south? How would a queer/crip analysis of contagion both complicate and enrich analyses of global healthcare imbalances and political debates about unequal access to treatments/immunizations/cures in the Global South?

How do queer/crip contagions contest or mark the failure of imperialist, colonialist, and/or capitalist practices of biosecurity, biometrics, or governance?
As we track and follow the patterns/trajectory of contagions, where will it take us? What new forms of inter/transdisciplinary alliances might open up?

And/or that engage the following key topics:

Virality; Immunity; Epidemics; Public health; Crip/queer time, temporalities, futures, futurities; Chronicity, chronic conditions; Capitalism, neoliberalism, austerity, precarity; Bioeconomies, biocapitalism, economization or financialization of life; Toxicity; Hybridity; Trans-ability; Intra-species relations; Health, hygiene, healthism;  Nature/Culture;  Disability, illness, impairment, madness, Deafness, neurodiverity; Making kin;  Ecologies, environments; Affect; Cripistemologies; Trauma, memory;  Nation, colonialism, imperialism; Biosecurity and racialization/pathologization; Bioterrorism

Guest Editors:

Kelly Fritsch, Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, Women & Gender Studies Institute and Technoscience Research Unit, University of Toronto kelly.fritsch@utoronto.ca
Anne McGuire, Assistant Professor, Equity Studies Program, University of Toronto anne.mcguire@utoronto.ca

Submission Process: Full papers (between 8,000- 11,000 words including references) should be sent by February 1, 2017 to Kelly Fritsch (kelly.fritsch@utoronto.ca)   and Anne McGuire (anne.mcguire@utoronto.ca). Please include “Queer/Crip Contagions Submission” in the subject line of your submission.

Author(s) should include three files as attachments:

1. Cover page with identifying information including name, title, institutional affiliation, address, phone numbers, and email;
2. Abstract and keywords;
3. Complete manuscript, with all identifying information removed. Files must be in Word (.doc) or Rich Text Format (.rtf).

All submissions must follow the Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) author-date system with parenthetical citations. All text, including quotations, must be double-spaced.

Following the deadline, guest editors will review the manuscripts and determine those to be sent for full anonymous review.

Feminist Formations style guide is available at: https://feministformations.org/sites/default/files/FeministFormationsStyleGuide2.pdf

Please contact either of the co-editors with questions or concerns about the submission process.

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We’re back! Return of the DRF…

Posted by jenslater on November 4, 2016

The rumours are true, after a short break of the DRF, we’re pleased to announce that the dates for 16-17 seminar series schedule is now available, along with details of the first seminar. We’re pleased to welcome Dr. Kirsty Liddiard (University of Sheffield) and Dr. Esther Ignagni (Ryerson University, Toronto) to speak on their groundbreaking, internationally acclaimed work, “Thinking with ‘Chemical Stories'”.

Monday, 28th November 2016, 11am-1pm, Arundel 10311

All people encounter chemicals – legal and illicit, helpful and harmful – in myriad and complicated ways.  This is particularly true for disabled people who rely on prescribed and generic chemicals for everyday functioning. Framing ‘chemicals’ as an open category, we are interested in everyday encounters with substances ranging from pharmaceuticals, street drugs, environmental pollutants, cosmetics and beyond. Narrative studies of chemical lives include the ‘storied lives of chemicals’; stories of chemical use within identified populations and ‘toxic tales’ of involuntary chemical exposure. These lines of inquiry position disability as an undesirable outcome of our chemical lives, and consequently a site of a precarious, dangerous or obliterated future.

Animated by initial findings from exploratory inquiries in Canada (Ignagni; Eliza Chandler) and the UK (Liddiard, China Mills) centered on people’s stories of their chemical lives, this workshop will begin with a brief description on this project’s framework, a brief review of how ‘chemical stories’ have been taken up in the fields of disability studies, feminist theory, and Indigenous Studies, and an account of the chemical stories we have engaged so far. The workshop will bring a focused discussion on the role of chemicals in our lives, specifically how chemicals both energize and deplete the future. Questions for workshop attendees will include:

  • Broadly speaking, how do you interact with chemicals in your everyday life?
  • How do interactions with chemicals capacitate some and incapacitate others (Erevelles, 2011; Fritsch, 2013)?
  • What kind of (crip) futurity do chemicals allow for (Kafer, 2012)?

Throughout this workshop, we will consider how ‘chemicals’ form and manifest disabling environments, shaping and maintaining particular subjectivities, embodiments and lives marked by difference, debility and exclusion through both mundane and extreme interactions. In this way, we will draw on and contribute to growing disability studies literature that interrogates how disability and impairments are socially produced within the environment by and through interactions with toxins, workplace hazards, and war .

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‘Disability and Blood’: Special Issue of JLCDS out now!

Posted by rebeccamallett on October 31, 2016

Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies – Volume 10, Issue 3 is out now.

Special Issue: Disability and Blood

Guest editors: Sören Fröhlich and Michael Davidson

JLCDS is available from Liverpool University Press, online and in print, to institutional and individual subscribers; it is also part of the Project MUSE collection to which the links below point.

Articles

Introduction: Blood Bound http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634642

Sören Fröhlich, Michael Davidson

Disability, Blood, and Liminality in Malory’s “Tale of the Sankgreal” http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634643

Tory V. Pearman

Otherwise Undisclosed: Blood, Species, and Benjy Compson’s Idiocy http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634644

David Oswald 

A State of Flux: On Bleeding http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634645

Roberto Brigati, Daniela Crocetti 

Deforming and Transforming: Towards a Theory of “Viral Mestizaje” in Chicano Literature http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634646

Victoria Carroll 

Blood Functions: Disability, Biosociality, and Facts of the Body http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634647

Kelly Fritsch 

Comments from the Field

The Voice of Disability, Seminar Series, Centre for Culture and Disability Studies, Liverpool Hope University http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634648

Owen Barden 

Disability, Coping, and Identity http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634649

Shahd Alshammari

Book Reviews

Fantasies of Identification: Disability, Gender, Race by Ellen Samuels (review)http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634650

David T. Mitchell

Depression: A Public Feeling by Ann Cvetkovich (review)http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634651

Corey Hickner-Johnson 

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2017 PhD Scholarship Programme: UNSW Australia

Posted by rebeccamallett on October 21, 2016

UNSW Australia is seeking applicants for the 2017 Scientia PhD Scholarship Programme

Research Area of Interest: Knowledge Exchange – Social Policy, Government and Health Policy – Social and Educational Inclusion and Disability

Specific Topic Area:  People with cognitive disability and complex support needs – voices in policy and practice

Description of the proposed project: This project will be an empirical inquiry into the experiences of people with cognitive disability who experience intense social disadvantage and connected with mental health issues, substance misuse, homelessness and/or contact with the criminal justice system. The project captures the voices of this group via innovative strategies to ensure the challenges they encounter are understood in multiple arenas of social care.

More information on the scheme and the application process is available via the following link: https://www.arts.unsw.edu.au/research/research-culture/scientia-fellowships-scholarships/2017-scientia-scholarships/

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