DRF News

European Disability Forum seeks ‘Policy Officer’ and ‘European Parliamentary Officer’: Are you the One?

The European Disability Forum has announced the opening of 2 positions: Policy Officer and; European Parliamentary Officer.

Closing date for receipt of applications: 17 November 2011 ~ Dates of the interview: 24-25-26 November 2011

POLICY OFFICER: More information on EDF website

EDF is seeking a dynamic policy officer with good knowledge on transport, accessibility, gender equality, inclusion and non-discrimination. The ideal candidate is committed to a human rights/social model approach to disability, understanding of social policy in relation to disability policies, able to work effectively in English and French and to assimilate and communicate information. The knowledge of EU policies, EU institutions and procedures will be an asset.

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENTARY OFFICER:  More information on EDF website

EDF is also looking for someone with good knowledge on the European Parliament, its committees, EU legislative process, relations with other institutions and consultative bodies and an ability to promote adequate legislation and policies based on human rights, social inclusion and non-discrimination for people with disabilities. The ideal candidate is: committed to a human rights approach to disability, has a good understanding of the interplay of disability with other policy areas, able to work effectively in English and French and to synthesise and communicate information. The knowledge of EU policies, EU institutions and procedures is essential.

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DRF News

CCDS Event: Altered Men: War, Body Trauma, and the Origins of the Cyborg Soldier in American Science Fiction’ ~ Sue Smith (November, UK)

Event: Centre for Culture & Disability Studies (CCDS) Research Forum 

Date: 16th November 2011: 2.15pm-3.45pm ~ Venue: Eden, 109, Liverpool Hope University, UK. 

Brief Description:

‘Altered Men: War, Body Trauma, and the Origins of the Cyborg Soldier in American Science Fiction’

~ Sue Smith (Centre for American Studies, University of Leicester, UK)

This CCDS Research Forum will host Dr. Sue Smith’s discussion of the emergence of (and fascination with) the altered human male in American Science Fiction. In particular, the focus will be on the reconstruction of the impaired soldier and Science Fiction texts that coincide with major wars and conflicts in western society. Additionally, Dr. Smith will offer analysis of texts and their significance to disability and gender at the time of their publication, and propose the need for further research in relation to more recent representations of the impaired soldier in Science Fiction.

For further information from the organisers, please contact: Dr. David Bolt: boltd@hope.ac.uk

DRF News

Are you a Postgrad working on ‘genetics’ from a disability studies perspective? (UK)

Call for Expressions of Interest: Genetics and Society

The Postgraduate Forum on Genetics and Society (PFGS) is calling for expressions of interest in hosting Regional Meetings (in the UK) during the academic year 2011-12. Thanks to generous funding from the ESRC via the Genomics Forum, we are able to offer small grants of up to £400 for postgraduates to host Regional Meetings at their home institutions.

Regional Meetings are designed as informal events for postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers from across the UK to come together in a small, supportive environment to exchange ideas, generate new questions, and develop connections between postgraduate and early career researchers in the life, health and social sciences.

Meetings may be focused on any topic broadly related to genetics and society, or the methodologies used to research this area. In particular, we would welcome hearing from those doing research in the health and biological sciences, as these areas have been generally under-represented. Postgraduate students working on issues related to genetics and society from a disability studies perspective are particularly invited to express an interest.  Events, however, should be of interest to a wide range of disciplines.

To apply, send an abstract of no more than 300 words in the first instance to pfgsmtgs@gmail.com  by November 15th, 2011. The abstract should outline your proposed title, the subject and format of your day, and the venue and possible dates.

The PFGS was founded in 1998 to provide a supportive network for postgraduate researchers from a variety of disciplines who are exploring questions around the intersection of bioscience and society.

For more details about PFGS, who we are and what we do, visit the PFGS blog at http://pfgs.wordpress.com.

 

 

DRF News

Another Call for Papers: Pacific Rim Conference on Disability and Diversity (26th-27th March 2012, Hawaii, USA)

Please note: This is the second CFPs that has been posted on the DRF blog and draws your attention to the Independent Living topic area, entitled, “The Global Independent Living Movement in the 21st Century.  The previous CFP, on ‘Intersectionality, Disability Culture, and Global Change’ topic area can be found here.

The Pacific Rim Conference on Disability and Diversity is being held 26th-27th March 2012 in Honolulu, HI (at the Hawai‘i Convention Center).

The Pacific Rim International Conference (Pac Rim) on Disability & Diversity has been widely recognized over the past 27 years as one of the most “diverse gatherings” in the world.  This year, the Independent Living topic area is entitled:

“The Global Independent Living Movement in the 21st century”

Living with a disability is a fact of life almost everyone in every society, culture and location will experience, either personally, or through family or friends. This year the Independent Living topic area will focus on diversity of ways Independent Living is implemented throughout the world. We encourage international submissions, including those from the Pacific Rim region. Questions and topics to be submitted for consideration as presentations, posters, or papers include:

– When and why did Independent Living start in your location
– How has the changing global economy affected Independent Living services and advocacy
– Share uses of technology in providing Independent Living services and advocacy
– Describe diverse populations being served with Independent Living services and advocacy, including positive outcomes and outstanding barriers
– How do families implement independent living in the 21st century
– Describe twenty-first century independent living for people with diverse disabilities, for example, cognitive disabilities or psychiatric disabilities
– Discuss how newly-acquired disabilities are currently addressed in Independent Living services and advocacy
– Has the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities changed how independent living is perceived and implemented
– How is Independent Living services and advocacy responding to aging populations
– How have changes in Assistive Technology affected implementing independent living
– Share the most important disability issues needing to be addressed in your area and possible solutions and resources needed

We encourage imaginative approaches to these and other issues you may want to suggest for this topic area. Proposals in any presentation format are welcomed. Please see presentation formats on the webpage at: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/submissions/presenters/formats/

Please check the criteria for each format and ensure that you have the appropriate number of presenters for your chosen format. You may submit proposals online at: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/submissions or send your proposals via email to prcall@hawaii.edu.  For more information about this topic area, contact the chairs: Steve Brown sebrown@hawaii.edu; Lillian Gonzales Brown eccentriclil@gmail.com; or Sheryl Nelson silchi@lava.net.

For general information on the conference please contact Charmaine Crockett ccrocke@hawaii.edu 

For information on registration please contact Michael Corlew prreg@hawaii.edu

DRF News

Call for Papers: Pacific Rim Conference on Disability and Diversity (26th-27th March 2012, Hawaii, USA)

The Pacific Rim Conference on Disability and Diversity is being held 26th-27th March 2012 in Honolulu, HI (at the Hawai‘i Convention Center).

The Pacific Rim International Conference (Pac Rim) on Disability & Diversity has been widely recognized over the past 27 years as one of the most “diverse gatherings” in the world.  Each year the conference hews to its traditional areas which have bred much of the interdisciplinary research and educational advances of the last three decades. But each year new topics are introduced to stimulate discussion and change.  This year, those topic areas include:

Intersectionality, Disability Culture, and Global Change

Disability Studies approaches disability as a social and cultural phenomena in which localized and global interpretations include socio-cultural, historical, political and rights-based perspectives. The Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity topic area, Disability Studies: Intersectionality, Disability Culture, and Global Change, seeks to imagine and convey the role of Disability Studies in all areas of academic scholarship and within cultural, gender, race, and ethnic studies. We welcome proposals in any area of Disability Studies, including: – How scholars within and outside of typical disability studies curricula are incorporating disability studies in teaching and research. – Current developments and national and global approaches to Disability Studies programs – Historical and contemporary perspectives about Disability Studies – Impact of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on Disability Studies, Disability Culture, and Global Change – The role of the Internet and technology, including social networking, distance learning, Universal Design and online research tools, on Disability Studies research and dissemination – How has Disability Studies impacted other disciplines, including feminist and queer studies, American Studies, sociology, psychology, and other academic fields – The ways in which Disability Culture has informed Disability Studies, cultural, gender, race, ethnic, film, arts & cultural studies

Proposals in any presentation format are welcomed. Please see presentation formats on the webpage at: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/submissions/presenters/formats/

Please check the criteria for each format and ensure that you have the appropriate number of presenters for your chosen format. You may submit proposals online at: http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu/submissions or send your proposals via email to prcall@hawaii.edu.

For more information about this topic area, contact: Megan Conway mconway@hawaii.edu; Steve Brown sebrown@hawaii.edu; Norma Jean Stodden nstodden@hawaii.edu or Holly Manaseri hmanser@hawaii.edu.

For general information on the conference please contact Charmaine Crockett ccrocke@hawaii.edu 

For information on registration please contact Michael Corlew prreg@hawaii.edu

DRF News

Details of next DRF Seminar ~ November 2011 (Sheffield, UK)

DRF Seminar Series: Seminar #2

Date/Time: 16th November 2011 (Weds) 2pm-4pm 

Venue: Room 10111 in the Arundel Building, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University (More information on the venue can be found here.)

  • Manny Madriaga (Sheffield Hallam University): Is seeking the disabled person voice really necessary in empancipatory research?

Abstract: This paper calls for a renewed thinking on emancipatory research when seeking the disabled student ‘voice’ in the arena of higher education.  Drawing on the work of critical race theory, particularly whiteness, disability studies in the United Kingdom recently has been foregrounding the social processes of normalcy.  Normalcy highlights the (re)production of disability in everyday life.  This, of course, raises uncomfortable questions, particularly on the significance of seeking the voice of disabled people. These questions are explored here, reflecting on research that encompassed stories of university support staff and their support of disabled students.

  • Erin Pritchard (Department of Geography, University of Newcastle): Space and time strategies of dwarfs in public space: Body size and rights of access to the built environment

Abstract: In this paper, I aim to explore the experiences of women dwarfs and their encounters with others within the built environment and how space and time affect their experiences and right to access spaces. I argue that a dwarf’s right to access different spaces is affected by both social and spatial barriers which occur during different times and within different spaces. It is argued within this paper that negotiations of everyday spaces – including avoidance due to fear of name-calling – affect a person’s basic rights. More specifically, attention is drawn to the reasons why dwarfs avoid certain areas because of their disability (which in this case is their size) and the ways they respond to particular situations within these spaces. I look at both how the built environment can be inaccessible and also how an attitudinal environment can create inaccessible spaces. Drawing upon recent work by Rosemary Garland Thomson (2011) I intend to show how having a small body results in people becoming ‘misfits’ within society through not fitting the norm both socially and spatially and therefore causing exclusion in various public spaces. This work draws upon ongoing qualitative research with women dwarfs in order to examine their social and spatial experiences and how they negotiate the built environment. The findings from this paper suggest that dwarfs do negotiate the built environment differently often though avoidance of particular spaces and this therefore limits their rights to access spaces.

Next Seminar: 6th December 2011 (Tues) 12pm-2pm

Harriet Cooper (Birkbeck College, University of London): Othering and Ordinariness in Representations of the Physically Impaired Child in Anglo-American Culture in the period 1870-1911

Jenny Slater (Department of Psychology, Manchester Metropolitan University): Time travelling with young disabled people: developing a queer, crip, critically young, futurist methodology

There are still slots available in early 2012, so if you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar please do get in touch.  Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book on which you’d like to facilitate discussion.  Please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk

DRF News

CFP: Symposium *On researching inclusion through inclusive research* (11th Nov 2011, MMU)

Critical Disability Studies Symposium *On researching inclusion through inclusive research*

FREE! symposium hosted by Manchester Metropolitan University

Date: 11th November 2011 ~ 10am-12pm

Venue: New Lecture Theatre, Elizabeth Gaskell Campus, Manchester Metropolitan University.

This symposium would like to bring together people interested and involved in research and practice concerning disability, education, co-research, self-advocacy and inclusion.

People who are interested can submit papers on following topics:

*      Exploring co-researching and what is inclusive research?
*      Exploring accessible literature, conferencing, and how academia shares its findings?
*      Exploring how we can bridge practice and research?
*      Exploring accessibility of higher education for people with learning difficulties?
*      Exploring how self-advocacy can tie in with research and research with self-advocacy?

Keynote will be facilitated by Toon Maillard (Guest scholar and researcher at the Critical Disability Studies Unit at MMU from Ghent University, Belgium)

Deadline for paper abstracts: 17th October 2011.

Submit abstracts via email to Toon Maillard: toon.maillard@ugent.be or Dan Goodleyd.goodley@mmu.ac.uk

DRF News

Reminder: DRF Seminar Series 2011-12 starts 11th October (Sheffield, UK)

DRF Seminar Series : Seminar #1

Date/Time: 11th October 2011 (Tues) 1pm-3pm 

Slot 1: Jayne Sellick (Department of Geography, University of Durham): The temporality of disabled identities: Examples from participatory work

Abstract: This paper explores the role of time and temporalities in the past and present experiences of participants, who as part of the project self-defined with a disabled identity. Drawing from a Participatory Action Research (P.A.R) agenda, stories relating to disability, impairment, health, chronic pain and illness were recalled. Using empirical examples I will explore the temporality of these experiences by thinking through the (non)representational.

Slot 2: Nick Hodge (Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion, Sheffield Hallam University): Misreading Arthur: Ableism at work in psychoanalysis and counselling

Abstract: Highly developed levels of reflection and self awareness by therapists and counsellors and the acceptance, and celebration, of the personal position of the client are foundational principles of counselling practice. It would be expected, therefore, that the counselling room might be the one space that would transcend the spectres of ableism (Campbell, 2009). However, the experiences of disabled people suggest that even here ableism continues to assert its insidious and invasive control (Reeve, 2000). This paper, by critiquing a particular account of psychotherapy with a disabled child, explores a number of ways in which ableism operates within the counselling room and negotiates the challenge of transversing different epistemic positions (Mackenzie and Leach Scully, 2007). The paper concludes by suggesting that only by watching their watching and reading their readings (Titchkosky, 2007) through an ‘inside-out’ approach (Williams, 1996) might counsellors reveal, confront and exorcise the spectres of ableism.

More information on the venue can be found here.

Next Seminar: 16th November 2011 (Weds) 2pm-4pm

Slot 3: Manny Madriaga (Sheffield Hallam University): Is seeking the disabled person voice really necessary in empancipatory research?

Slot 4: Erin Pritchard (Department of Geography, University of Newcastle): Space and time strategies of dwarfs in public space: Body size and rights of access to the built environment

If you, or anybody you know, would like to present at a DRF seminar please do get in touch.  Alternatively, let us know if there is an issue/article/book on which you’d like to facilitate discussion.  Please email Rebecca Mallett: r.mallett@shu.ac.uk