DRF News

Reminder: DRF is back on Monday with a session on ‘Thinking with ‘Chemical Stories’

Just a quick reminder that the dates for 16-17 seminar series schedule is now available, along with details of the first seminar.

Dr. Kirsty Liddiard (University of Sheffield) and Dr. Esther Ignagni (Ryerson University, Toronto) will be sharing their groundbreaking, internationally acclaimed work, “Thinking with ‘Chemical Stories’” on Monday, 28th November 2016, 11am-1pm, Arundel 10311 (Sheffield Hallam University).

More info here.

Venue: Seminars are held in the Arundel Building, 122 Charles Street, City Campus, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB.  For a map of City Campus click here.

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Event: Next steps for transforming caring for people with learning disabilities (Jan. 2017: London, UK)

Event Title: Next Steps For Transforming Caring For People With Learning Disabilities: Funding, Integration and Community Care

Date: Friday, 27th January 2017

Place: Central London

– This event is CPD certified –

With local Transforming Care Partnerships (TCPs) beginning their work, this timely seminar will provide an opportunity to assess future policy priorities for people with learning disabilities across health and social care.

Delegates will consider the implementation of NHS England’s Building the Right Support plan, with local plans proposed by TCPs – collaborations between Clinical Commissioning Groups, local authorities and specialised commissioners – due to be assessed against countrywide objectives, with the aim of, by 2019, reducing the reliance on inpatient care and establishing a national service delivery model for commissioners and providers.

Further sessions focus on the impact of population-based healthcare, via new 
Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs), on care for people with learning disabilities, the impact of new inspection methodologies announced in the CQC’s five-year strategy on the regulation of care, and priorities for personalising care in light of the national rollout of the Integrated Personal Commissioning programme – as well as improving access to primary care for people with learning disabilities.

A service user from CHANGE has agreed to deliver an address at the seminar.

Professor Jane Cummings, Chief Nursing Officer, NHS England has also agreed to deliver an address at this seminar.

Sue Darker, Operations Director, Learning Disabilities and Mental Health, Hertfordshire County Council; Sharon Jeffreys, Head of Commissioning – Learning Disabilities, NHS South West Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group; Dr Theresa Joyce, National Professional Advisor on Learning Disabilities, CQC; Sarah Maguire, Director, Learning Disability England (formerly Housing & Support Alliance) and Managing Director, Choice Support; Dr Neil Ralph, Programme Manager for Mental Health and Learning Disability, Health Education England and; Jim Thomas, Programme Head – Workforce Innovation, Skills for Care have also agreed to speak. 

Lord Adebowale, Non-Executive Director, NHS England and Chief Executive Officer, Turning Point has kindly agreed to chair a session at this seminar.

 

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‘Disability and Blood’: Special Issue of JLCDS out now!

Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies – Volume 10, Issue 3 is out now.

Special Issue: Disability and Blood

Guest editors: Sören Fröhlich and Michael Davidson

JLCDS is available from Liverpool University Press, online and in print, to institutional and individual subscribers; it is also part of the Project MUSE collection to which the links below point.

Articles

Introduction: Blood Bound http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634642

Sören Fröhlich, Michael Davidson

Disability, Blood, and Liminality in Malory’s “Tale of the Sankgreal” http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634643

Tory V. Pearman

Otherwise Undisclosed: Blood, Species, and Benjy Compson’s Idiocy http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634644

David Oswald 

A State of Flux: On Bleeding http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634645

Roberto Brigati, Daniela Crocetti 

Deforming and Transforming: Towards a Theory of “Viral Mestizaje” in Chicano Literature http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634646

Victoria Carroll 

Blood Functions: Disability, Biosociality, and Facts of the Body http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634647

Kelly Fritsch 

Comments from the Field

The Voice of Disability, Seminar Series, Centre for Culture and Disability Studies, Liverpool Hope University http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634648

Owen Barden 

Disability, Coping, and Identity http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634649

Shahd Alshammari

Book Reviews

Fantasies of Identification: Disability, Gender, Race by Ellen Samuels (review)http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634650

David T. Mitchell

Depression: A Public Feeling by Ann Cvetkovich (review)http://muse.jhu.edu/article/634651

Corey Hickner-Johnson 

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Call for Submissions: Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies #3

Journal: Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies

Submissions Due: 1st January 2017

Description: The Equity Studies program (at New College, University of Toronto) invites submissions for the next issue of Knots: An Undergraduate Journal of Disability Studies. Knots is a peer-reviewed journal that highlights high-calibre work by undergraduate students, and undergraduate alumni*, which moves beyond normative biomedical conceptions of disability and contributes to the development and growth of Disability Studies as a field. The editors are open to the widest array of topics that contribute to Disability Studies and to the continued examination and deconstruction of ableism. Submissions in the forms of essays, creative writing, book and film reviews, and art pieces are welcome. Submissions are not limited to students from the University of Toronto.

The theme for Knots Issue #3 is interdependency. Interdependency challenges ableist and capitalist assumptions of independence as a universal ideal. In ‘Changing the framework: Disability Justice’ Mia Mingus (2011) writes:

“we want to move away from the “myth of independence,” that everyone can and should be able to do everything on their own. I am not fighting for independence … I am fighting for an interdependence that embraces need and tells the truth: no one does it on their own and the myth of independence is just that, a myth.”

In a world where the desirability of independence is a rarely questioned norm, embracing interdependency can be a radical act of resistance for disabled people and allies. Interdependency exists on many levels, including (but not limited to) between humans; humans and animals; humans and machines; and within communities.

We welcome a range of submissions, including those that engage with the concept of interdependency in the context of Disability Studies. We encourage all submissions to take up an intersectional analysis.

Requirements and Reviewing: Submissions should be original and unpublished with an emphasis on completed (rather than intended) works. Essays should be 4500 words maximum, excluding bibliography; book and film reviews should be 1000 words maximum; art pieces should be accompanied by an artist’s statement not in excess of 500 words.

Style and Process: Manuscripts should be fully and correctly cited in APA style. Submissions will be evaluated on both significance and relevance to the field of Disability Studies as well as technical strength and clarity, and should be accompanied by a 100-word abstract and a short author bio. Submitted work will be subject to peer-review; successfully reviewed entries will be returned to submitters for revisions before being approved for publication. Once the editorial period has come to a close, we will not accept any changes to an accepted paper.

Submission Procedure & Information: The submission process is electronic: all manuscript submissions can be made online to knots.contact@gmail.com by no later than January 1st, 2017. The author/s name and the title of work both should appear in the subject line of the email; the full manuscript should be attached as a PDF file to the editors.

 Any questions regarding content, submission, or accessibility requests should be directed to knots.contact@gmail.com.

* ‘Undergraduate alumni’ refers to people who are no longer registered undergraduate students but who wish to submit work produced during their undergraduate degree.

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CFP: ‘The Biopolitics of Art Education’ for Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

Journal: Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

Call for Papers for Special Issue: The Biopolitics of Art Education

Guest Editors: Claire Penketh (Disability and Education, Liverpool Hope University) and Jeff Adams (Education, University of Chester)

In The Biopolitics of Disability David Mitchell and Sharon Snyder argue that “curriculum needs to contextualize the lives of crip/queer people in order to create a context of receptivity for a more productive interaction with the embodied differences of crip/queer lives in school.” This special issue seeks to explore the ways art education might respond to such a call to develop disability pedagogy and curriculum content with “the active participation of crip/queer subjects.”

Art education has been long recognised and valued for its contribution to learning for children, young people, and adults. More recently there have been moves to explore art education as critical social practice, recognising the importance of art education to identity work. Although lines have been drawn around visual arts education, moves to incorporate contemporary practices have resulted in a more expansive range of approaches (e.g., video installations, performance art, and conceptual art pieces examining the use of text and ready-mades). However, art education has also been subject to criticisms of anachronistic and exclusionary practice.

This special issue asks: is there a need for curriculum reform in order to make crip/queer content integral to art education? How can art education respond to the request for creative pedagogies that resist processes of normalization? How can art education learn from people’s differences? How can literary and cultural representations of disability inform pedagogies in art education? Where does art education fit in recent developments in Disability Studies? How can Disability Studies be informed by recent research in art education?

Please email a one-page proposal to penketc@hope.ac.uk and j.adams@chester.ac.uk by April 1, 2017. Contributors can expect to be selected and notified by June 1, 2017. (Full drafts of the selected articles will be due on March 1, 2018). Please direct any questions to either guest editor.

 

 

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Westminster Health Forum – Improving care for people with learning disabilities (May, 2016: London, UK)

Seminar Title: Improving Care for People With Learning Disabilities – Commissioning, Regulation And Reducing Hospital Admissions

Date: Wednesday, 11th May 2016

Place: Sixty One Whitehall, London SW1A 2ET

 **This event is CPD certified**

 Guest of Honour: Dr Dominic Slowie, National Clinical Director for Learning Disabilities, NHS England and Chair, North East and Cumbria Learning Disability Network

This timely seminar will provide an opportunity to assess future policy priorities for people with learning disabilities and/or autism across health and social care. Delegates will consider key issues outlined in NHS England, ADASS and the LGA’s Building the Right Support plan, which aims to reduce the reliance on inpatient care, establish a new service model by 2019 and create joined-up Transforming Care Partnerships for health and social care commissioners locally. Further sessions focus on plans outlined in the Department of Health response to the No Voice Unheard, No Right Ignored consultation, which included proposals for a named social worker and potential amendments to regulations in the Mental Health Act 1983. The agenda also looks at next steps for developing the workforce, and challenges for integrating and personalising care for people with learning disabilities through the use of personal budgets and the Integrated Personal Commissioning programme.

For more information, including our speakers, please click here.

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Anyone for Hawaii? CFP: Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity 2016

The 32nd Annual Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity will be held on 25-26 April 2016, at the Hawai’i Convention Center in Honolulu, USA.

This year they are featuring topic areas such as Putting Research into Practice and Disability Studies.

The Call for Proposals is NOW OPEN.

For more information, please visit www.pacrim.hawaii.edu, or feel free to e-mail at prinfo@hawaii.edu, or call at 1-808-956-7539.

DRF News

CFP: Disability and Impairment: a Technological Fix? (Nov. 2015: UK)

Event Title: Disability and Impairment: a Technological Fix?

Date: 27th November 2015

Location: London Metropolitan Archives, 40 Northampton Road, London, EC1R 0HB

Part of Disability History Month and supported by the King’s Fund, this conference will feature a range of speakers including community groups, heritage organisations and academics.

CALL FOR PAPERS

Papers are invited from across the heritage, cultural, academic and grassroots communities. Our aim is to generate a dialogue between these groups through a programme of presentations and shorts talks discussing the theme of technological change and the portrayal of disability then and now.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Assistive technology– the changing ways in which technology has been seen to act as an equaliser and a ‘fix’ for disability
  • Medical technology– the ways in which new medical technology has affected concepts of what is “normal”
  • A revolution?– comparisons of the portrayal of disability in the information age with agricultural and industrial societies.

We invite short abstracts of between 50 and 200 words for informal 10 minute presentations that share work-in- progress or provide an introduction to new projects or research that address these themes.  We also invite abstracts for 20 minute papers or presentations exploring them themes in more detail.

This conference is being delivered on a not for profit basis and the organisers are unable to cover speakers costs except in cases where speakers would otherwise be prevented from attending for financial reasons.

Abstract deadline: 1 October 2015

Abstracts to: tom.furber@cityoflondon.gov,uk

DRF News

Special Issue on ‘Disability and Television’ out now!!

This month the Journal of Popular Television is publishing an exciting special issue on ‘disability and television’ edited by Rebecca Mallett (Sheffield Hallam University) and Brett Mills (University of East Anglia).

More info can be found here: http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-issue,id=2916/

Articles include:

  • Something special: Care, pre-school television and the dis/abled child ~ Amy Holdsworth
  • ‘It’s really scared of disability’: Disabled comedians’ perspectives of the British television comedy industry ~ Sharon Lockyer
  • From awww to awe factor: UK audience meaning-making of the 2012 Paralympics as mediated spectacle ~ Caroline E. M. Hodges,  Richard Scullion and  Daniel Jackson
  • Supersize vs. Superskinny: (Re)framing the freak show in contemporary popular culture ~ Allison Leadley
  • In their words: How television and visual media can raise awareness of dementia and other health conditions that carry stigma, including disabilities ~ Michelle Heward, James Palfreman-Kay and  Anthea Innes
  • Disability in television crime drama: Transgression and access ~ Katie Ellis

Reflection Pieces include:

  • Disability and television: Notes from the field ~ Sarah Barton
  • A ‘surprising and mature portrait’? Reflecting on representations of mental illness in Rookie Blue ~  Shane Brown
  • Is New Zealand ready for more diversity on-screen? ~ Philip Patston and  Barbara Pike

Enjoy 🙂

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Seminar: ‘Great Expectations’ – Child Youth & Family Disability Research Network – South West & Wales

This event (held in Cardiff) will focus on the ‘Lost voices’ of children and youth with disabilites. There will be opportunities to network with other interested people to explore ‘Great Expectations’ for disabled children and youth and listen to 2 speakers who will present their research:

Dr Aaron Prtichard from Bangor University: ‘Lost Voices? Young People with Palliative Care Needs’

Dr Kirsty Liddiard from the University of Sheffield and the Sexuality Working Alliance Group (Open University and Together for Short Lives)’:“I need privacy and respect for privacy as a sexual person”: Young People’s Voices, Sex/uality and the Palliative Care Context.

More information: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/great-expectationschild-youthfamily-disability-research-network-sw-wal-tickets-15045553656?utm_campaign=new_event_email&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb_email&utm_term=eventurl_text